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Press releases

Press releases are posted on this site once the embargo period has expired. Journalists can view releases prior to this by visiting www.alphagalileo.org or by contacting our Head of Communications to be added to the mailing list.

  1. Reduction in HPV in young women in England seen following introduction of national immunisation programme

    14 April 2014

    Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR HPV) types 16 and 18 is responsible for around 70-80% of cervical cancers. A study conducted by Public Health England and presented today at the Society for General Microbiology's Annual Conference shows a reduction in these two HR HPV types – which are included in the HPV vaccines used – in sexually active young women in England.

  2. New open access journal, JMM Case Reports, launched

    23 January 2014

    JMM Case Reports is the Society’s first fully gold open access publication meaning that all articles will be freely available for anyone to read as soon as they are published.

  3. Whole genome sequencing provides researchers with a better understanding of bovine TB outbreaks

    4 September 2013

    The use of whole bacterial genome sequencing will allow scientists to inexpensively track how bovine tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted from farm to farm, according to research presented this week at the Society for General Microbiology Autumn Conference.

  4. Research identifies how mouth cells resist Candida infection

    3 September 2013

    Candida albicans is a common fungus found living in, and on, many parts of the human body. Usually this species causes no harm to humans unless it can breach the body’s immune defences, where can lead to serious illness or death. It is known as an opportunistic pathogen that can colonise and infect individuals with a compromised immune system. New research, presented today at the Society for General Microbiology’s Autumn Conference, gives us a greater understanding of how mucosal surfaces in the body respond to C. albicans to prevent damage being done during infection.

  5. Stomach bacteria switch off human immune defences to cause disease

    2 September 2013

    Helicobacter pylori is a bacterium that establishes a life-long stomach infection in humans, which in some cases can lead to duodenal ulcers or stomach cancer. New research, presented today at the Society for General Microbiology’s Autumn Conference, gives us a clearer understanding of how these bacteria can manipulate the human immune system to survive in the mucosal lining of the stomach.

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