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Annual Conference 2017

3 - 6 April 2017
Days to event: 37 days

The Microbiology Society Annual Conference 2017 will take place between Monday 3 April to Thursday 6 April and will be held at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC), Edinburgh, UK.

The Society’s Annual Conference attracts over 1,200 attendees for Europe’s largest annual gathering of microbiologists.

Session topics

Main symposia
  • Anaerobe 2017: molecular, genomic and metagenomic insights into anaerobic infection – Thursday
  • Annual Meeting of Protistology-UK: Intracellular infection and endosymbiosis within protists – Monday
  • Aquatic microbiology: New model organisms and new challenges – Tuesday, Wednesday
  • Cell biology of pathogen entry into host cells – Thursday
  • Critical health challenges in medical mycology – Thursday
  • Epigenetics and non-coding RNA – Wednesday, Thursday
  • Geomicrobiology – Monday, Tuesday
  • Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms – Wednesday, Thursday
  • Just passing through – virus infections and the GI tract – Monday
  • Microbial cell surfaces – Wednesday, Thursday
  • Microbial circadian and metabolic rhythyms – Monday, Tuesday
  • Microbial genomics: From single cells to large populations – Wednesday, Thursday
  • Microbial mechanisms of plant pathology – Monday, Tuesday
  • Prokaryotic macromolecular machines – Monday
  • Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 1 – Tuesday
  • Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 2 – Thursday
  • Synthetic and systems approaches to microbiology – Monday, Tuesday
Forums
  • Environmental and applied microbiology forum – Thursday
  • Microbial physiology, metabolism and molecular mechanisms forum – Wednesday
  • Prokaryotic genetics and genomics forum – Tuesday
  • Prokaryotic infection forum – Tuesday
Virus workshops
  • Antivirals and vaccines – Wednesday
  • Clinical virology – Wednesday
  • Evolution and virus populations – Wednesday
  • Gene expression and replication – Wednesday
  • Innate immunity – Wednesday
  • Morphogenesis, egress and entry – Wednesday
  • Pathogenesis – Wednesday
Professional Development sessions
  • Post-PhD: Finding a career that suits you – Monday
  • Scientific Publishing: How to review scientific manuscripts – Tuesday
  • Scientific Publishing: How to write a manuscript for submission – Tuesday

If you have any questions please email conferences@microbiologysociety.org

Follow us on Twitter @MicrobioSoc.

Updates on the Annual Conference 2017 can be found using the hashtag: #Microbio17

Highlights

Pre-Conference networking workshop

Pre-Conference networking workshop

Open Address

Open Address

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)
Programme

Type

Session

Sunday 02 April, Afternoon

Registration

16:00 - 20:00

Registration

Pre-Conference networking workshop

18:00 - 20:00

Pre-Conference networking workshop

Monday 03 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:00 - 09:15

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:00 - 09:00

Registration

Open Address

09:30 - 09:50

Open Address

Annual Meeting of Protistology-UK: Intracellular infection and endosymbiosis within protists

This session will cover part of the Annual Meeting of the Protistology-UK Society, and it will focus on the infection and endosymbiotic events of different microbes (viruses, bacteria and protozoa) that take place in microbial eukaryotes. The session will seek to discuss, how various organisms cope with the presence of their “endoysmbionts” or “pathogens” and to provide models to study basic processes on the endosymbiont/pathogen-host cell relationship and potentially the origin of new organelles.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Bass (Natural History Museum, UK)

Welcome and introduction of the Protistology-UK Society

10:00 - 10:30

Welcome and introduction of the Protistology-UK Society

A photosynthetic amoeba and a symbiont-harboring trypanosomatid help to elucidate molecular mechanisms that underlie host–endosymbiont interactions

10:30 - 11:00

A photosynthetic amoeba and a symbiont-harboring trypanosomatid help to elucidate molecular mechanisms that underlie host–endosymbiont interactions

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Endosymbiotic relationships in anaerobic eukaryotes

11:30 - 12:00

Endosymbiotic relationships in anaerobic eukaryotes

Possible hijacking of the host plastids by an intracellular parasite (Amoebophyra spp., Syndiniales) of microalgae

12:00 - 12:30

Possible hijacking of the host plastids by an intracellular parasite (Amoebophyra spp., Syndiniales) of microalgae

Manipulation of mammalian and amoeba cellular processes by the AnkB effector of Legionella pneumophila

12:30 - 13:00

Manipulation of mammalian and amoeba cellular processes by the AnkB effector of Legionella pneumophila

Geomicrobiology

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of micro-organisms in influencing geological processes including geochemical cycles. While much of the discipline is less than 40 years old, it is fundamental to the understanding of the origin of life and the role of microbes in the cycling of elements in the environment. Recent advances in the field have come about largely by new approaches (e.g. the “omics” technologies, stable isotope probing, biophysical and microscopy techniques) that allow the detailed study of cultured and uncultured microorganisms and the impact they have on the environment. This session will include topics on the origin of life and evolution, microbial energetics and metabolism, microbial ecology, biomineralisation and mineral precipitation, bioremediation and weathering.

ORGANISERS

Joanne Santini (University College London, UK), Thomas Clarke (University of East Anglia, UK)

Chair : Joanne Santini

How convection, electrons, protons and photons drove the first microbes into being

10:00 - 10:30

How convection, electrons, protons and photons drove the first microbes into being

New insights into ancient molecular fossils: Reinterpreting 2-methylhopanes

10:30 - 11:00

New insights into ancient molecular fossils: Reinterpreting 2-methylhopanes

On the origins of heredity in protocells

11:00 - 11:30

On the origins of heredity in protocells

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Thomas Osborne

Geomycology: metals, minerals and fungi

12:00 - 12:30

Geomycology: metals, minerals and fungi

Turning sunlight into stone: how plants and microorganisms use an oxalate-carbonate pathway to trap CO2

12:30 - 13:00

Turning sunlight into stone: how plants and microorganisms use an oxalate-carbonate pathway to trap CO2

Just passing through – virus infections and the GI tract

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides an accessible environment for virus infection and replication. GI tract viral infections, including those by rotaviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses cause a globally significant burden of mortality and morbidity. Over 70% of cases of infectious diarrhoea are caused by viruses; for example, noroviruses are the leading cause of diarrhoea globally with an estimated 685 million cases a year and are also the main cause of foodborne illness, and rotaviruses cause over 100 million cases of infantile severe gastroenteritis per annum with up to 0.26 million deaths. New vaccines, better understanding of the biology and replication of these viruses, and the comprehension of crosstalk between viral and bacterial components of the microbiome offers ways to reduce this disease burden. This one day conference will provide an overview of the causes of viral gastroenteritis, the epidemiology of infections and viral pathogenesis, coupled with discussions of the immunology of the GI tract and the development of effective vaccines to control and prevent disease.

ORGANISERS

David Evans (University of St Andrews, UK), Miren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK)

Delivery systems and adjuvants for enhanced oral vaccination

10:00 - 10:30

Delivery systems and adjuvants for enhanced oral vaccination

TBC

10:30 - 11:00

TBC

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - The role of USP7 in influenza virus entry

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - The role of USP7 in influenza virus entry

Offered oral - Zika virus and the chamber of secrets: unravelling virus–host immune response interactions

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Zika virus and the chamber of secrets: unravelling virus–host immune response interactions

Can rotavirus vaccine performance improve in the populations worst affected?

12:00 - 12:30

Can rotavirus vaccine performance improve in the populations worst affected?

Offered oral - The impact of influenza A virus morphology on the inhibitory effect of respiratory mucus

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - The impact of influenza A virus morphology on the inhibitory effect of respiratory mucus

Offered oral - Synthesising a conformationally stable PV-1 empty capsid vaccine

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Synthesising a conformationally stable PV-1 empty capsid vaccine

Microbial circadian and metabolic rhythyms

The identification of genetic components of the circadian clock in diverse organisms from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals suggests that a circadian oscillator is intrinsic to all kingdoms. There is little conservation among the clock components, however, suggesting that clocks have evolved independently and that circadian rhythmicity is an adaptive feature. Alternatively, the conserved circadian rhythms in cellular metabolism could indicate that a conserved oscillator exists in parallel with or indeed on top of 'canonical' clock mechanisms.

ORGANISERS

Sue Crosthwaite (University of Manchester, UK), Ed Lous (University of Leicester, UK), Elinor Thompson (University of Greenwich, UK), Gerben van Ooijen (University of Edinburgh, UK)

The molecular basis of metabolic cycles

10:00 - 10:30

The molecular basis of metabolic cycles

A Day in the Life of a Cyanobacterium: integrating temporal and environmental information

10:30 - 11:00

A Day in the Life of a Cyanobacterium: integrating temporal and environmental information

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation

11:30 - 12:00

Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation

Zeitgebers, the circadian clock and microbial cultures

12:00 - 12:30

Zeitgebers, the circadian clock and microbial cultures

Microbial manipulation of animal behavior: how biological clocks could be involved

12:30 - 13:00

Microbial manipulation of animal behavior: how biological clocks could be involved

Microbial mechanisms of plant pathology

Plant pathogens are often considered less “sexy” than their mammalian counterparts, yet these species represent a major threat to food production worldwide. Moreover, they employ a bewildering array of mechanisms – often borrowed from, or adapted by their mammalian cousins - with which to subvert host defences (or conversely, sometimes even enhance plant growth). In this session, we aim to explore the diverse strategies used by bacteria, fungi and viruses to colonise plant tissues (to the advantage or to the detriment to the host). Topics ranging from the origin(s) and impact of Ash die-back, the roles played by quorum sensing and cyclic-di-GMP in controlling bacterial infection, PAMPs, oomycete effectors and viral infections will be covered by the World’s top experts in these areas. We will also explore why some organisms seem to form mutualistic (rather than pathogenic) relationships with their hosts, and address the cutting-edge technologies that have been developed to investigate these mechanisms and interactions. This is a session for anyone with an interest in the molecular mechanisms that underpin microbial pathogenicity.

ORGANISERS

Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (James Hutton Institute, UK), Kevin Kavanagh (NUI Maynooth, Ireland)

Genome and virulence regulatory mechanisms of Dickeya zeae

10:00 - 10:30

Genome and virulence regulatory mechanisms of Dickeya zeae

Fungi challenge global food security

10:30 - 11:00

Fungi challenge global food security

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Elucidating and re-designing regulatory networks underlying plant–pathogen interaction

11:30 - 12:00

Elucidating and re-designing regulatory networks underlying plant–pathogen interaction

Regulation of enzyme production in soft rot enterobacteria

12:00 - 12:30

Regulation of enzyme production in soft rot enterobacteria

The threat to plant health from invasive alien Phytophthora species

12:30 - 13:00

The threat to plant health from invasive alien Phytophthora species

Prokaryotic macromolecular machines

While science strives to harness the potential of nano-technology, it has become apparent that natural selection has already provided many solutions. Advances in molecular biology and high-resolution imaging have revealed the incredible complexity and efficiency of macromolecular protein machines. Prokaryotes have developed nano-scale devices to answer a range of problems including motility, secretion and delivery of bioactive macromolecules into the environment and other cells. Topics covered in this session will be of interest from both a pure academic and more applied biotechnology perspective as they will include the ribosome, pili/fimbrae, flagella and protein secretion. Offered papers on all aspects of prokaryotic (both bacteria and archea) macromolecular machines are welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Jonathan Shaw (University of Sheffield, UK), Nick Waterfield (University of Warwick, UK), Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (The James Hutton Institute, UK)

Length regulation in a bacterial cell-surface nanomachine: ordered export and assembly in the bacterial flagellum

10:00 - 10:30

Length regulation in a bacterial cell-surface nanomachine: ordered export and assembly in the bacterial flagellum

Assembly of an antibacterial speargun: the type VI secretion system

10:30 - 11:00

Assembly of an antibacterial speargun: the type VI secretion system

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Photorhabdus virulence cassettes: a nano-syringe based toxin secretion and delivery system

11:30 - 12:00

Photorhabdus virulence cassettes: a nano-syringe based toxin secretion and delivery system

The Tat protein export pathway

12:00 - 12:30

The Tat protein export pathway

Mechanism of action of Tc toxins

12:30 - 13:00

Mechanism of action of Tc toxins

Synthetic and systems approaches to microbiology

Synthetic and systems biology approaches are revolutionising basic biological research, promising a paradigm shift in the way biology as a science is approached. As the cost of DNA synthesis plummets, and large scale DNA assembly is within our reach, synthetic and systems biology are promising to bring our understanding of microbes to the level needed for large-scale engineering. Systems biology approaches provide tools needed to understand key cellular physiological functions and ultimately create the basis for robust and reliable cell engineering. The tools of synthetic and systems biology go hand-in-hand and this session will bring together leaders working at the intersection of these fields to provide a timely update on the state-of-the-art. Themes covered will include synthetic biology in extreme conditions, microbial interactions, designing biology and microbial factories. Together the session will provide an exciting overview of the field which looks set to make a significant impact on industrial biotechnology as well as more fundamental microbiology research.
Theme 1: The Synthetic and Systems Biology in Extreme Conditions. This session includes talks on aspects of synthetic and systems approaches in extreme environments and microbes.
Theme 2: Synthetic and Systems Approaches to Microbial Interactions. The ways in which microbes interact plays an influential role in their behaviour both in hosts and in industrial fermenters. This session takes a look at how we can interrogate the basis of these interactions and will be of interest to those exploring microbiomes and industrial biotechnology.
Theme 3: Designing Biology. In this session we will explore the importance of design of synthetic systems from the perspectives of both artists and scientists. What can we design and why?
Theme 4: Microbial Cell Factories. This session will include a range of experts who are using synthetic biology approaches to design new-generation cell factories using microalgal host strains. It will be of interest to a range of delegates interested in industrial biotechnology and will complement the talks on other chassis, e.g. Saccharomyces in the other parts of the session.

ORGANISERS

Meriem El Karoui (University of Edinburgh, UK), Teuta Pilizota (University of Edinburgh, UK), Susan Rosser (University of Edinburgh, UK), Colin Robinson (University of Kent, UK)

TBC

10:00 - 10:30

TBC

Using bacteriophages to make novel nano-scale devices

10:30 - 11:00

Using bacteriophages to make novel nano-scale devices

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Design of a low-cost, automated photobioreactor for control of bacterial optogentic circuit and synthetic circuit characterization

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Design of a low-cost, automated photobioreactor for control of bacterial optogentic circuit and synthetic circuit characterization

Offered oral - Sustainable microbiological production of the next-generation material graphene

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Sustainable microbiological production of the next-generation material graphene

Flash poster

12:00 - 12:05

Flash poster

Flash poster

12:05 - 12:10

Flash poster

Flash poster

12:10 - 12:15

Flash poster

Synthetic systems inspired by genetic regulation

12:15 - 12:45

Synthetic systems inspired by genetic regulation

Post-PhD: Finding a career that suits you

Making a decision about what to do after your PhD can be daunting. When considering the lack of academic positions for newly qualified PhD researchers, it can be helpful to think about the breadth of career options available to you as a highly trained professional scientist - with skills and aptitudes that you may not yet have realised. Dr Sarah Blackford, author of Career Planning for Research Bioscientists, will demonstrate her PhD Career Choice Indicator – showing users how to identify initial career options by looking at their skills and passions. During the afternoon session, participants will also hear from microbiologists who have had interesting career paths and learn top tips for how to build their CV for the career they want – including a chance for their CV to be reviewed by their peers. This session is aimed at early career researchers, however is suitable for those looking to make their next career step.

ORGANISERS

Microbiology Society Professional Development Committee

Welcome to the session

11:00 - 11:05

Welcome to the session

Your career – what next?

11:05 - 13:00

Your career – what next?

Monday 03 April, Afternoon

Antibiotics Unearthed – Posters showcase

13:00 - 14:00

Antibiotics Unearthed – Posters showcase

Annual Meeting of Protistology-UK: Intracellular infection and endosymbiosis within protists

This session will cover part of the Annual Meeting of the Protistology-UK Society, and it will focus on the infection and endosymbiotic events of different microbes (viruses, bacteria and protozoa) that take place in microbial eukaryotes. The session will seek to discuss, how various organisms cope with the presence of their “endoysmbionts” or “pathogens” and to provide models to study basic processes on the endosymbiont/pathogen-host cell relationship and potentially the origin of new organelles.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Bass (Natural History Museum, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Offered oral - Reconstruction of ancient plastid proteome reveals the origins and fate of complex plastid lineages

14:00 - 14:15

Offered oral - Reconstruction of ancient plastid proteome reveals the origins and fate of complex plastid lineages

Offered oral - Multidisciplinary investigation on two "Candidatus fokinia" (Rickettsiales) endosymbionts of Paramecium

14:15 - 14:30

Offered oral - Multidisciplinary investigation on two "Candidatus fokinia" (Rickettsiales) endosymbionts of Paramecium

Environmental context dependence in a photosynthetic endosymbiosis

14:30 - 15:00

Environmental context dependence in a photosynthetic endosymbiosis

The biology of giant DNA viruses such as mimivirus and the biodiversity of the marine microbial world

15:00 - 15:30

The biology of giant DNA viruses such as mimivirus and the biodiversity of the marine microbial world

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Comparative transcriptomics reveals the effect of the bacterial endosymbiont Caedibacter taeniospiralis on Paramecium tetraurelia host gene expression

16:00 - 16:15

Offered oral - Comparative transcriptomics reveals the effect of the bacterial endosymbiont Caedibacter taeniospiralis on Paramecium tetraurelia host gene expression

Offered oral - Insight into the life-cycles of important bivalve parasites using lineage-specific molecular probing

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Insight into the life-cycles of important bivalve parasites using lineage-specific molecular probing

Environmental sampling to identify novel emergent microsporidian parasite lineages

16:30 - 17:00

Environmental sampling to identify novel emergent microsporidian parasite lineages

Symbiosis: new perspectives from eukaryotic endosymbionts within pathogenic amoebae

17:00 - 17:30

Symbiosis: new perspectives from eukaryotic endosymbionts within pathogenic amoebae

Geomicrobiology

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of micro-organisms in influencing geological processes including geochemical cycles. While much of the discipline is less than 40 years old, it is fundamental to the understanding of the origin of life and the role of microbes in the cycling of elements in the environment. Recent advances in the field have come about largely by new approaches (e.g. the “omics” technologies, stable isotope probing, biophysical and microscopy techniques) that allow the detailed study of cultured and uncultured microorganisms and the impact they have on the environment. This session will include topics on the origin of life and evolution, microbial energetics and metabolism, microbial ecology, biomineralisation and mineral precipitation, bioremediation and weathering.

ORGANISERS

Joanne Santini (University College London, UK), Thomas Clarke (University of East Anglia, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Chair : Joanne Santini

Exploring the deep terrestrial hydrosphere and biosphere

14:00 - 14:30

Exploring the deep terrestrial hydrosphere and biosphere

On thin ice: glacier microbiology

14:30 - 15:00

On thin ice: glacier microbiology

Unexpected facets of marine nitrifiers

15:00 - 15:30

Unexpected facets of marine nitrifiers

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Thomas Clarke

Anoxygenic photosynthesis, photoreactions from femtoseconds to millenia

16:00 - 16:30

Anoxygenic photosynthesis, photoreactions from femtoseconds to millenia

Offered oral - Identity and functional relationships of sediment and bacterial interactions in the sub-glacial basal ice ecosystem of the Svínafellsjökull glacier (S.E. Iceland)

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Identity and functional relationships of sediment and bacterial interactions in the sub-glacial basal ice ecosystem of the Svínafellsjökull glacier (S.E. Iceland)

Offered oral - Microbial and bioelectrochemical recovery of metals from wastewater

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Microbial and bioelectrochemical recovery of metals from wastewater

The microbial methane cycle

17:00 - 17:30

The microbial methane cycle

Just passing through – virus infections and the GI tract

The gastrointestinal (GI) tract provides an accessible environment for virus infection and replication. GI tract viral infections, including those by rotaviruses, noroviruses and astroviruses cause a globally significant burden of mortality and morbidity. Over 70% of cases of infectious diarrhoea are caused by viruses; for example, noroviruses are the leading cause of diarrhoea globally with an estimated 685 million cases a year and are also the main cause of foodborne illness, and rotaviruses cause over 100 million cases of infantile severe gastroenteritis per annum with up to 0.26 million deaths. New vaccines, better understanding of the biology and replication of these viruses, and the comprehension of crosstalk between viral and bacterial components of the microbiome offers ways to reduce this disease burden. This one day conference will provide an overview of the causes of viral gastroenteritis, the epidemiology of infections and viral pathogenesis, coupled with discussions of the immunology of the GI tract and the development of effective vaccines to control and prevent disease.

ORGANISERS

David Evans (University of St Andrews, UK), Miren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Epidemiology of gastrointestinal tract viral infections

14:00 - 14:30

Epidemiology of gastrointestinal tract viral infections

Rotavirus disease mechanisms: the gut–nerve–brain cross-talk

14:30 - 15:00

Rotavirus disease mechanisms: the gut–nerve–brain cross-talk

Identification of cis and trans acting factors involved in the norovirus life cycle

15:00 - 15:30

Identification of cis and trans acting factors involved in the norovirus life cycle

Offered oral - Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag expression and virion production by SR proteins

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag expression and virion production by SR proteins

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:45 - 16:15

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - An essential role for the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 during non-canonical autophagy in influenza virus infection

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - An essential role for the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 during non-canonical autophagy in influenza virus infection

Glycan interactions in gastroenteric viruses – implications for host tropism, host adaptation, susceptibility to infection, neutralization, and zoonosis

16:30 - 17:00

Glycan interactions in gastroenteric viruses – implications for host tropism, host adaptation, susceptibility to infection, neutralization, and zoonosis

The influence of commensal bacteria on norovirus infection

17:00 - 17:30

The influence of commensal bacteria on norovirus infection

Microbial circadian and metabolic rhythyms

The identification of genetic components of the circadian clock in diverse organisms from bacteria and fungi to plants and animals suggests that a circadian oscillator is intrinsic to all kingdoms. There is little conservation among the clock components, however, suggesting that clocks have evolved independently and that circadian rhythmicity is an adaptive feature. Alternatively, the conserved circadian rhythms in cellular metabolism could indicate that a conserved oscillator exists in parallel with or indeed on top of 'canonical' clock mechanisms.

ORGANISERS

Sue Crosthwaite (University of Manchester, UK), Ed Lous (University of Leicester, UK), Elinor Thompson (University of Greenwich, UK), Gerben van Ooijen (University of Edinburgh, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Parasite offence or host defence? The roles of biological rhythms in malaria infection

14:00 - 14:30

Parasite offence or host defence? The roles of biological rhythms in malaria infection

Metabolic cycles in yeast share features conserved among circadian rhythms

14:30 - 15:00

Metabolic cycles in yeast share features conserved among circadian rhythms

Dynamics of light-induced transcription in Neurospora

15:00 - 15:30

Dynamics of light-induced transcription in Neurospora

Offered oral - Frequency doubling in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Frequency doubling in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:45 - 16:15

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Rhythms, replication and pathogenesis: The circadian clock and virus infection

16:15 - 16:45

Rhythms, replication and pathogenesis: The circadian clock and virus infection

Offered oral - Peripheral host rhythms drive rhythms of malaria parasites

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Peripheral host rhythms drive rhythms of malaria parasites

Microbial mechanisms of plant pathology

Plant pathogens are often considered less “sexy” than their mammalian counterparts, yet these species represent a major threat to food production worldwide. Moreover, they employ a bewildering array of mechanisms – often borrowed from, or adapted by their mammalian cousins - with which to subvert host defences (or conversely, sometimes even enhance plant growth). In this session, we aim to explore the diverse strategies used by bacteria, fungi and viruses to colonise plant tissues (to the advantage or to the detriment to the host). Topics ranging from the origin(s) and impact of Ash die-back, the roles played by quorum sensing and cyclic-di-GMP in controlling bacterial infection, PAMPs, oomycete effectors and viral infections will be covered by the World’s top experts in these areas. We will also explore why some organisms seem to form mutualistic (rather than pathogenic) relationships with their hosts, and address the cutting-edge technologies that have been developed to investigate these mechanisms and interactions. This is a session for anyone with an interest in the molecular mechanisms that underpin microbial pathogenicity.

ORGANISERS

Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (James Hutton Institute, UK), Kevin Kavanagh (NUI Maynooth, Ireland)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Delivery and activity of Phytophthora effectors that suppress plant immunity

14:00 - 14:30

Delivery and activity of Phytophthora effectors that suppress plant immunity

Regulation of receptor kinase-mediated immune signaling

14:30 - 15:00

Regulation of receptor kinase-mediated immune signaling

Offered oral - Flagellin application perturbs the microbiota thriving thriving at the barley-root soil interface

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Flagellin application perturbs the microbiota thriving thriving at the barley-root soil interface

Offered oral - Using bacteria to fight bacteria: Parasitisation of ferredoxin-uptake receptors in Pectobacterium

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Using bacteria to fight bacteria: Parasitisation of ferredoxin-uptake receptors in Pectobacterium

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Plant–virus interactions: the role of sub-nuclear structures

16:00 - 16:30

Plant–virus interactions: the role of sub-nuclear structures

A sleigh ride through the SNO: Role of S-nitrosylation in plant immunity

16:30 - 17:00

A sleigh ride through the SNO: Role of S-nitrosylation in plant immunity

A persistent reservoir of a genomic island in Pseudomonas syringae pv. Phaseolicola

17:00 - 17:30

A persistent reservoir of a genomic island in Pseudomonas syringae pv. Phaseolicola

Prokaryotic macromolecular machines

While science strives to harness the potential of nano-technology, it has become apparent that natural selection has already provided many solutions. Advances in molecular biology and high-resolution imaging have revealed the incredible complexity and efficiency of macromolecular protein machines. Prokaryotes have developed nano-scale devices to answer a range of problems including motility, secretion and delivery of bioactive macromolecules into the environment and other cells. Topics covered in this session will be of interest from both a pure academic and more applied biotechnology perspective as they will include the ribosome, pili/fimbrae, flagella and protein secretion. Offered papers on all aspects of prokaryotic (both bacteria and archea) macromolecular machines are welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Jonathan Shaw (University of Sheffield, UK), Nick Waterfield (University of Warwick, UK), Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (The James Hutton Institute, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

A tail of phage and tubeworms: How do bacteria mediate animal development?

14:00 - 14:30

A tail of phage and tubeworms: How do bacteria mediate animal development?

Structural and functional analysis of type III secretion systems

14:30 - 15:00

Structural and functional analysis of type III secretion systems

Offered oral - Engineering and exploiting flotation – gas vesicle production in enterobacteria

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Engineering and exploiting flotation – gas vesicle production in enterobacteria

Offered oral - Allosteric regulation of secretory system ATPases by the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Allosteric regulation of secretory system ATPases by the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Molecular mechanism of type IV pilus assembly

16:00 - 16:30

Molecular mechanism of type IV pilus assembly

Understanding functions of the type VII secretion systems

16:30 - 17:00

Understanding functions of the type VII secretion systems

Crystal structures of bacteriophage receptor-binding proteins

17:00 - 17:30

Crystal structures of bacteriophage receptor-binding proteins

Synthetic and systems approaches to microbiology

Synthetic and systems biology approaches are revolutionising basic biological research, promising a paradigm shift in the way biology as a science is approached. As the cost of DNA synthesis plummets, and large scale DNA assembly is within our reach, synthetic and systems biology are promising to bring our understanding of microbes to the level needed for large-scale engineering. Systems biology approaches provide tools needed to understand key cellular physiological functions and ultimately create the basis for robust and reliable cell engineering. The tools of synthetic and systems biology go hand-in-hand and this session will bring together leaders working at the intersection of these fields to provide a timely update on the state-of-the-art. Themes covered will include synthetic biology in extreme conditions, microbial interactions, designing biology and microbial factories. Together the session will provide an exciting overview of the field which looks set to make a significant impact on industrial biotechnology as well as more fundamental microbiology research.
Theme 1: The Synthetic and Systems Biology in Extreme Conditions. This session includes talks on aspects of synthetic and systems approaches in extreme environments and microbes.
Theme 2: Synthetic and Systems Approaches to Microbial Interactions. The ways in which microbes interact plays an influential role in their behaviour both in hosts and in industrial fermenters. This session takes a look at how we can interrogate the basis of these interactions and will be of interest to those exploring microbiomes and industrial biotechnology.
Theme 3: Designing Biology. In this session we will explore the importance of design of synthetic systems from the perspectives of both artists and scientists. What can we design and why?
Theme 4: Microbial Cell Factories. This session will include a range of experts who are using synthetic biology approaches to design new-generation cell factories using microalgal host strains. It will be of interest to a range of delegates interested in industrial biotechnology and will complement the talks on other chassis, e.g. Saccharomyces in the other parts of the session.

ORGANISERS

Meriem El Karoui (University of Edinburgh, UK), Teuta Pilizota (University of Edinburgh, UK), Susan Rosser (University of Edinburgh, UK), Colin Robinson (University of Kent, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Engineering synthetic microbial communities for understanding and applications

14:00 - 14:30

Engineering synthetic microbial communities for understanding and applications

Flash talk

14:30 - 14:35

Flash talk

Flash talk

14:35 - 14:40

Flash talk

Offered oral - A platform to study meta-population dynamics of bacterial populations

14:40 - 14:55

Offered oral - A platform to study meta-population dynamics of bacterial populations

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

14:55 - 15:25

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Systems approaches to studying regulatory networks of bacterial plasmids

15:25 - 15:55

Systems approaches to studying regulatory networks of bacterial plasmids

A crosstalk between mutually exclusive cell fates moves biofilms

15:55 - 16:25

A crosstalk between mutually exclusive cell fates moves biofilms

What determines the spatial structure of bacterial biofilms and aggregates?

16:25 - 16:55

What determines the spatial structure of bacterial biofilms and aggregates?

Offered oral - Understanding the mechanism of action of novel rumen-derived antimicrobial peptides against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

16:55 - 17:10

Offered oral - Understanding the mechanism of action of novel rumen-derived antimicrobial peptides against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Offered oral - Quantifying bacterial DNA double-strand break repair in rael time

17:10 - 17:25

Offered oral - Quantifying bacterial DNA double-strand break repair in rael time

Offered oral - Osmotaxis in Escherichia coli through changes in flagellar motor speed

17:25 - 17:40

Offered oral - Osmotaxis in Escherichia coli through changes in flagellar motor speed

Live at Lunch: Microbiology Careers Networking

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Microbiology Careers Networking

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Post-PhD: Finding a career that suits you

Making a decision about what to do after your PhD can be daunting. When considering the lack of academic positions for newly qualified PhD researchers, it can be helpful to think about the breadth of career options available to you as a highly trained professional scientist - with skills and aptitudes that you may not yet have realised. Dr Sarah Blackford, author of Career Planning for Research Bioscientists, will demonstrate her PhD Career Choice Indicator – showing users how to identify initial career options by looking at their skills and passions. During the afternoon session, participants will also hear from microbiologists who have had interesting career paths and learn top tips for how to build their CV for the career they want – including a chance for their CV to be reviewed by their peers. This session is aimed at early career researchers, however is suitable for those looking to make their next career step.

ORGANISERS

Microbiology Society Professional Development Committee

Microbiology careers case studies

14:00 - 15:30

Microbiology careers case studies

CV workshop

15:30 - 17:00

CV workshop

Microbiome Research – opportunity or over-hype?

17:40 - 18:30

Microbiome Research – opportunity or over-hype?

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

Society promotion

19:00 - 19:10

Society promotion

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

20:30 - 22:30

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Tuesday 04 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:30 - 08:45

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:30 - 08:45

Registration

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

09:00 - 09:50

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

Aquatic microbiology: New model organisms and new challenges

We will review our current understanding on aquatic microbial communities (protists, bacteria, viruses), including their ecological roles in the oceans, their diversity, functions and behaviours but also their heir origins and evolution. The session will be divided into two parts: in the first part, we will discuss the different genetic models that have been developed for marine microeukaryotes/protists, based on the recent initiative from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on “Increasing the Potential of Marine Microeukaryotes as Experimental Model Systems through the Development of Genetic Tools”. The second session will examine the diversity, ecology and evolution of various groups of organisms within these aquatic ecosystems and review the current status quo and potential future applications, which will allow us to deeply understand the complexity and relations of the aquatic micro-organisms in these ecosystems.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Montagnes (University of Liverpool, UK)

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Initiatives and introduction to the session

10:00 - 10:30

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Initiatives and introduction to the session

Genome editing in Thalassiosira pseudonana and Fragilariopsis cylindrus: challenges and opportunities for diatom research

10:30 - 11:00

Genome editing in Thalassiosira pseudonana and Fragilariopsis cylindrus: challenges and opportunities for diatom research

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Functional genomic approaches to understand diatom biology

11:30 - 12:00

Functional genomic approaches to understand diatom biology

A symbiotic apicomplexan and the bacteria that make it possible

12:00 - 12:30

A symbiotic apicomplexan and the bacteria that make it possible

Offered oral - Algal polysaccharide utilisation by saprotrophic planktonic marine fungi

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - Algal polysaccharide utilisation by saprotrophic planktonic marine fungi

Offered oral - Developing Corallochytrium limacisporum, an enigmatic unicellular opisthokont, as a new model organism

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Developing Corallochytrium limacisporum, an enigmatic unicellular opisthokont, as a new model organism

Geomicrobiology

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of micro-organisms in influencing geological processes including geochemical cycles. While much of the discipline is less than 40 years old, it is fundamental to the understanding of the origin of life and the role of microbes in the cycling of elements in the environment. Recent advances in the field have come about largely by new approaches (e.g. the “omics” technologies, stable isotope probing, biophysical and microscopy techniques) that allow the detailed study of cultured and uncultured microorganisms and the impact they have on the environment. This session will include topics on the origin of life and evolution, microbial energetics and metabolism, microbial ecology, biomineralisation and mineral precipitation, bioremediation and weathering.

ORGANISERS

Joanne Santini (University College London, UK), Thomas Clarke (University of East Anglia, UK)

Chair : Joanne Santini

How metagenomics-based approaches illuminate diversity and metabolic potential of subsurface microbiomes and their influence on biogeochemical cycling

10:00 - 10:30

How metagenomics-based approaches illuminate diversity and metabolic potential of subsurface microbiomes and their influence on biogeochemical cycling

Bacterial metabolism of isoprene: a missing link in the biogeochemical cycling of isoprene

10:30 - 11:00

Bacterial metabolism of isoprene: a missing link in the biogeochemical cycling of isoprene

Impacts of microbes on past and present environments

11:00 - 11:30

Impacts of microbes on past and present environments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Marcus Edwards

The geomicrobiology of the nuclear fuel cycle

12:00 - 12:30

The geomicrobiology of the nuclear fuel cycle

Novel insights into microbial production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

12:30 - 13:00

Novel insights into microbial production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

Microbial mechanisms of plant pathology

Plant pathogens are often considered less “sexy” than their mammalian counterparts, yet these species represent a major threat to food production worldwide. Moreover, they employ a bewildering array of mechanisms – often borrowed from, or adapted by their mammalian cousins - with which to subvert host defences (or conversely, sometimes even enhance plant growth). In this session, we aim to explore the diverse strategies used by bacteria, fungi and viruses to colonise plant tissues (to the advantage or to the detriment to the host). Topics ranging from the origin(s) and impact of Ash die-back, the roles played by quorum sensing and cyclic-di-GMP in controlling bacterial infection, PAMPs, oomycete effectors and viral infections will be covered by the World’s top experts in these areas. We will also explore why some organisms seem to form mutualistic (rather than pathogenic) relationships with their hosts, and address the cutting-edge technologies that have been developed to investigate these mechanisms and interactions. This is a session for anyone with an interest in the molecular mechanisms that underpin microbial pathogenicity.

ORGANISERS

Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (James Hutton Institute, UK), Kevin Kavanagh (NUI Maynooth, Ireland)

Investigating plant symbioses in the root using cell type-specific analysis

10:00 - 10:30

Investigating plant symbioses in the root using cell type-specific analysis

Improving plant health by bacterial volatiles

10:30 - 11:00

Improving plant health by bacterial volatiles

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Endophytic colonization from roots to seeds: ecology and how plants can benefit

11:30 - 12:00

Endophytic colonization from roots to seeds: ecology and how plants can benefit

Colonization of crop plants by Salmonella enterica

12:00 - 12:30

Colonization of crop plants by Salmonella enterica

Offered oral - Gene expression analyses of the bacterial tree pathogens Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii in vitro and in planta

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - Gene expression analyses of the bacterial tree pathogens Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii in vitro and in planta

Offered oral - Multi-omic profiling of the microbiome–host interactions in Acute Oak Decline

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Multi-omic profiling of the microbiome–host interactions in Acute Oak Decline

Prokaryotic infection forum

Offered papers will be presented in areas related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level.

ORGANISERS

Sheila Patrick (Queen's University Belfast, UK), Sabine Tötemeyer (University of Nottingham, UK)

Antibiotics, resistance and you

10:00 - 10:30

Antibiotics, resistance and you

Offered oral - Small colony variants: Size isn't everything

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Small colony variants: Size isn't everything

Offered oral - Uncovering the lock and key of Escherichia coli – platelet interactions

10:45 - 11:00

Offered oral - Uncovering the lock and key of Escherichia coli – platelet interactions

Offered oral - Propionic acid induces rapid evolution of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Propionic acid induces rapid evolution of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC

Flash poster

11:15 - 11:20

Flash poster

Flash poster

11:20 - 11:25

Flash poster

Flash poster

11:25 - 11:30

Flash poster

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - The Streptococcus agalactiae virulence regular CovR affects the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - The Streptococcus agalactiae virulence regular CovR affects the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection

Offered oral - Effect of the endocarditis-associated Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin, LukAB, on polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Effect of the endocarditis-associated Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin, LukAB, on polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration

Offered oral - SLIC by name, slick by nature

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - SLIC by name, slick by nature

Offered oral - Development of a next-generation sequencing metagenomics pipeline for rapid sepsis diagnosis

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Development of a next-generation sequencing metagenomics pipeline for rapid sepsis diagnosis

Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 1

Control of expression of virus and host RNA during virus infection is fundamental to the life cycle of all viruses. RNA production is essential for virus replication, gene expression and manipulation of the host environment. Viruses have evolved complex mechanisms of transcription activation, control and termination including epigenetic regulation and recruitment of host factors to promoters and transcriptional enhancers. In addition, the production of non-coding RNAs is essential for some viruses to manipulate the cellular environment and support virus replication. Protein production often requires complex post-transcriptional processing of viral RNAs and nuclear export, facilitated by hijacking host cell systems. This two-day symposium will provide an overview of the regulation of virus transcription of diverse viruses and the many ways in which viruses manipulate cellular gene expression to support productive virus infection.

ORGANISERS

Colin Crump (University of Cambridge, UK), Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK), Silke Schepelmann (NIBSC, UK)

Continuous and discontinuous RNA synthesis in coronaviruses

10:00 - 10:30

Continuous and discontinuous RNA synthesis in coronaviruses

Chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency

10:30 - 11:00

Chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency

Offered oral - Population diversity of genome intermediates following imprecise recombination events in enteroviruses

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Population diversity of genome intermediates following imprecise recombination events in enteroviruses

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:15 - 11:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Dissecting the initial steps of transcription and genome replication in the non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses

11:45 - 12:15

Dissecting the initial steps of transcription and genome replication in the non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses

Tales of the unexpected: regulation of viral transcription and mis-regulation of host small RNA pathways

12:15 - 12:45

Tales of the unexpected: regulation of viral transcription and mis-regulation of host small RNA pathways

Offered oral - Rapid mammalian adaptation of an avian H9N2 influenza virus

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Rapid mammalian adaptation of an avian H9N2 influenza virus

Scientific Publishing: How to write a manuscript for submission

Effective communication of scientific findings in both oral and written forms is critical. Poorly communicated research can adversely impact a scientist’s career. In addition, poor English can preclude the proper assessment of the quality of a scientist’s work during the peer-review process. This in part is due to lack of proper instruction in these key areas. The workshop will focus on PhD students, postdoctoral fellows and early career scientists, who are seeking to improve their skills in the preparation of manuscripts for publication in peer-reviewed journals. A certificate of completion will be provided to all participants. At the end of the workshop, the participants will: • Understand the rigorous process of peer-review in scientific publishing • Understand what Editors are looking for in a manuscript • Have the opportunity to meet and network with editors who are highly-knowledgeable in their respective fields • Understand Society publishing submissions process • Understand the structure of different types of manuscripts • Have the opportunity to receive feedback on their work and ask questions

ORGANISERS

Norman Fry and Kalai Mathee (both Journal of Medical Microbiology, UK)

Participants' self-introductions to rest of group

10:00 - 10:30

Participants' self-introductions to rest of group

Group discussion

10:30 - 10:50

Group discussion

Components of a manuscript

10:50 - 12:00

Components of a manuscript

Choosing a journal and article type, and the importance of instructions to authors

12:00 - 12:15

Choosing a journal and article type, and the importance of instructions to authors

How to respond to reviewers' comments

12:15 - 12:30

How to respond to reviewers' comments

Authorship guidelines

12:30 - 12:40

Authorship guidelines

Journal of Medical Microbiology publishing submission process

12:40 - 12:50

Journal of Medical Microbiology publishing submission process

Conclude and wrap up

12:50 - 13:00

Conclude and wrap up

Synthetic and systems approaches to microbiology

Synthetic and systems biology approaches are revolutionising basic biological research, promising a paradigm shift in the way biology as a science is approached. As the cost of DNA synthesis plummets, and large scale DNA assembly is within our reach, synthetic and systems biology are promising to bring our understanding of microbes to the level needed for large-scale engineering. Systems biology approaches provide tools needed to understand key cellular physiological functions and ultimately create the basis for robust and reliable cell engineering. The tools of synthetic and systems biology go hand-in-hand and this session will bring together leaders working at the intersection of these fields to provide a timely update on the state-of-the-art. Themes covered will include synthetic biology in extreme conditions, microbial interactions, designing biology and microbial factories. Together the session will provide an exciting overview of the field which looks set to make a significant impact on industrial biotechnology as well as more fundamental microbiology research.
Theme 1: The Synthetic and Systems Biology in Extreme Conditions. This session includes talks on aspects of synthetic and systems approaches in extreme environments and microbes.
Theme 2: Synthetic and Systems Approaches to Microbial Interactions. The ways in which microbes interact plays an influential role in their behaviour both in hosts and in industrial fermenters. This session takes a look at how we can interrogate the basis of these interactions and will be of interest to those exploring microbiomes and industrial biotechnology.
Theme 3: Designing Biology. In this session we will explore the importance of design of synthetic systems from the perspectives of both artists and scientists. What can we design and why?
Theme 4: Microbial Cell Factories. This session will include a range of experts who are using synthetic biology approaches to design new-generation cell factories using microalgal host strains. It will be of interest to a range of delegates interested in industrial biotechnology and will complement the talks on other chassis, e.g. Saccharomyces in the other parts of the session.

ORGANISERS

Meriem El Karoui (University of Edinburgh, UK), Teuta Pilizota (University of Edinburgh, UK), Susan Rosser (University of Edinburgh, UK), Colin Robinson (University of Kent, UK)

Coacervate micro-droplets as artificial cellular mimics

10:00 - 10:30

Coacervate micro-droplets as artificial cellular mimics

Synthetic biological construction: Beyond 'bio-inspired' in the design of new materials and fabrication systems

10:30 - 11:00

Synthetic biological construction: Beyond 'bio-inspired' in the design of new materials and fabrication systems

Rapid streamlining of E. coli by genome-wide editing techniques

11:00 - 11:30

Rapid streamlining of E. coli by genome-wide editing techniques

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Design and construction of a genetic tool with constitutive promoters of varying strength to study function and evolution of proteins from distantly related bacteria in Escherichia coli

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Design and construction of a genetic tool with constitutive promoters of varying strength to study function and evolution of proteins from distantly related bacteria in Escherichia coli

Offered oral - Optimising the production of bulk chemicals from carbon monoxide using a genome-scale model of Clostridium autoethanogenum

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Optimising the production of bulk chemicals from carbon monoxide using a genome-scale model of Clostridium autoethanogenum

Engineering an artificial bacterial flagellar motor using DNA scaffold nanotechnology

12:30 - 13:00

Engineering an artificial bacterial flagellar motor using DNA scaffold nanotechnology

Tuesday 04 April, Afternoon

Aquatic microbiology: New model organisms and new challenges

We will review our current understanding on aquatic microbial communities (protists, bacteria, viruses), including their ecological roles in the oceans, their diversity, functions and behaviours but also their heir origins and evolution. The session will be divided into two parts: in the first part, we will discuss the different genetic models that have been developed for marine microeukaryotes/protists, based on the recent initiative from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on “Increasing the Potential of Marine Microeukaryotes as Experimental Model Systems through the Development of Genetic Tools”. The second session will examine the diversity, ecology and evolution of various groups of organisms within these aquatic ecosystems and review the current status quo and potential future applications, which will allow us to deeply understand the complexity and relations of the aquatic micro-organisms in these ecosystems.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Montagnes (University of Liverpool, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Developing a new transfection system for Naegleria

14:00 - 14:30

Developing a new transfection system for Naegleria

Diplonemids – extremely diverse marine protists with unknown function

14:30 - 15:00

Diplonemids – extremely diverse marine protists with unknown function

Offered oral - Abundance of carbapenem-resistance bacteria in wastewater treatment plant

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Abundance of carbapenem-resistance bacteria in wastewater treatment plant

Offered oral - UniEuk: a universal taxonomic framework and integrated reference gene databases to synergize research in eukaryotic biology, ecology, and evolution

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - UniEuk: a universal taxonomic framework and integrated reference gene databases to synergize research in eukaryotic biology, ecology, and evolution

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Genetic manipulation in Dinozoans: a key to unlocking the many mysteries of these bizarre cells

16:00 - 16:30

Genetic manipulation in Dinozoans: a key to unlocking the many mysteries of these bizarre cells

Offered oral - Virus resistance affects evolutionary response of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri to environmental change

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Virus resistance affects evolutionary response of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri to environmental change

Toward establishment of model organisms for marine protist taxa: successful transfection protocols for the marine protists Bodo caudatus and Monosiga brevicolis

16:45 - 17:15

Toward establishment of model organisms for marine protist taxa: successful transfection protocols for the marine protists Bodo caudatus and Monosiga brevicolis

Geomicrobiology

Geomicrobiology is the study of the role of micro-organisms in influencing geological processes including geochemical cycles. While much of the discipline is less than 40 years old, it is fundamental to the understanding of the origin of life and the role of microbes in the cycling of elements in the environment. Recent advances in the field have come about largely by new approaches (e.g. the “omics” technologies, stable isotope probing, biophysical and microscopy techniques) that allow the detailed study of cultured and uncultured microorganisms and the impact they have on the environment. This session will include topics on the origin of life and evolution, microbial energetics and metabolism, microbial ecology, biomineralisation and mineral precipitation, bioremediation and weathering.

ORGANISERS

Joanne Santini (University College London, UK), Thomas Clarke (University of East Anglia, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Chair : Thomas Osborne & Marcus Edwards

Importance of lithoautotrophy in shallow groundwaters

14:00 - 14:30

Importance of lithoautotrophy in shallow groundwaters

Offered oral - Relating the effects of soil hydrophobicity at atomic, biomolecular, core and national scales

14:30 - 14:45

Offered oral - Relating the effects of soil hydrophobicity at atomic, biomolecular, core and national scales

Offered oral - The cryptosphere – viable spores in deep geothermal waters not detectable by standard microbiological techniques

14:45 - 15:00

Offered oral - The cryptosphere – viable spores in deep geothermal waters not detectable by standard microbiological techniques

Diversity and diversification of ammonia oxidisers

15:00 - 15:30

Diversity and diversification of ammonia oxidisers

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Thomas Clarke

Microbes, minerals and biotechnology

16:00 - 16:30

Microbes, minerals and biotechnology

Hydrogen as a microbial fuel

16:30 - 17:00

Hydrogen as a microbial fuel

Evolutionary interplay between biology's metallome and the geoenvironment of the planet

17:00 - 17:30

Evolutionary interplay between biology's metallome and the geoenvironment of the planet

Microbial mechanisms of plant pathology

Plant pathogens are often considered less “sexy” than their mammalian counterparts, yet these species represent a major threat to food production worldwide. Moreover, they employ a bewildering array of mechanisms – often borrowed from, or adapted by their mammalian cousins - with which to subvert host defences (or conversely, sometimes even enhance plant growth). In this session, we aim to explore the diverse strategies used by bacteria, fungi and viruses to colonise plant tissues (to the advantage or to the detriment to the host). Topics ranging from the origin(s) and impact of Ash die-back, the roles played by quorum sensing and cyclic-di-GMP in controlling bacterial infection, PAMPs, oomycete effectors and viral infections will be covered by the World’s top experts in these areas. We will also explore why some organisms seem to form mutualistic (rather than pathogenic) relationships with their hosts, and address the cutting-edge technologies that have been developed to investigate these mechanisms and interactions. This is a session for anyone with an interest in the molecular mechanisms that underpin microbial pathogenicity.

ORGANISERS

Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK), Nicola Holden (James Hutton Institute, UK), Kevin Kavanagh (NUI Maynooth, Ireland)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

The role of the host microenvironment in plant disease development

14:00 - 14:30

The role of the host microenvironment in plant disease development

Action and reaction of host and mycotoxin during the development of Fusarium head blight disease

14:30 - 15:00

Action and reaction of host and mycotoxin during the development of Fusarium head blight disease

Offered oral - Characterisation of ΦM1 and ΦRC10, two phages of the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, capable of escaping two Type III toxin-antitoxin/abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Characterisation of ΦM1 and ΦRC10, two phages of the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, capable of escaping two Type III toxin-antitoxin/abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene

Offered oral - Using network-extracted ontologies to identify novel genes with roles in appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Using network-extracted ontologies to identify novel genes with roles in appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The ins and outs of the wheat root microbiome

16:00 - 16:30

The ins and outs of the wheat root microbiome

Defining the host control of the rhizosphere bacterial microbiota

16:30 - 17:00

Defining the host control of the rhizosphere bacterial microbiota

Up and down-regulation of quorum-sensing in the niche constructing pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

17:00 - 17:30

Up and down-regulation of quorum-sensing in the niche constructing pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 1

Control of expression of virus and host RNA during virus infection is fundamental to the life cycle of all viruses. RNA production is essential for virus replication, gene expression and manipulation of the host environment. Viruses have evolved complex mechanisms of transcription activation, control and termination including epigenetic regulation and recruitment of host factors to promoters and transcriptional enhancers. In addition, the production of non-coding RNAs is essential for some viruses to manipulate the cellular environment and support virus replication. Protein production often requires complex post-transcriptional processing of viral RNAs and nuclear export, facilitated by hijacking host cell systems. This two-day symposium will provide an overview of the regulation of virus transcription of diverse viruses and the many ways in which viruses manipulate cellular gene expression to support productive virus infection.

ORGANISERS

Colin Crump (University of Cambridge, UK), Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK), Silke Schepelmann (NIBSC, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

The role of the Merkel cell polyomavirus early gene products in the regulation of viral gene expression and long-term persistence of viral episomes

14:00 - 14:30

The role of the Merkel cell polyomavirus early gene products in the regulation of viral gene expression and long-term persistence of viral episomes

Influenza virus RNA synthesis and innate immune sensing

14:30 - 15:00

Influenza virus RNA synthesis and innate immune sensing

Offered oral - The role of host cell miRNAs in the KSHV lytic replication cycle

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - The role of host cell miRNAs in the KSHV lytic replication cycle

Offered oral - Molluscum contagiosum HLA-1 homologue MC080 promotes CD8+ T cell evasion and modulates NK cell recognition by downregulating endogenous classical HLA-I, HLA-E and MICA008

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Molluscum contagiosum HLA-1 homologue MC080 promotes CD8+ T cell evasion and modulates NK cell recognition by downregulating endogenous classical HLA-I, HLA-E and MICA008

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The multifunctional herpes simplex virus protein ICP27 plays a pivotal role in regulating viral gene expression

16:00 - 16:30

The multifunctional herpes simplex virus protein ICP27 plays a pivotal role in regulating viral gene expression

Regulation of human papillomavirus gene expression at the level of RNA processing

16:30 - 17:00

Regulation of human papillomavirus gene expression at the level of RNA processing

Offered oral - Novel family of peptides with potent antiviral activity against influenza A viruses

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Novel family of peptides with potent antiviral activity against influenza A viruses

Offered oral - Retroviral Invasion of the Koala Genome part II. What is it doing to the koalas?

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Retroviral Invasion of the Koala Genome part II. What is it doing to the koalas?

Synthetic and systems approaches to microbiology

Synthetic and systems biology approaches are revolutionising basic biological research, promising a paradigm shift in the way biology as a science is approached. As the cost of DNA synthesis plummets, and large scale DNA assembly is within our reach, synthetic and systems biology are promising to bring our understanding of microbes to the level needed for large-scale engineering. Systems biology approaches provide tools needed to understand key cellular physiological functions and ultimately create the basis for robust and reliable cell engineering. The tools of synthetic and systems biology go hand-in-hand and this session will bring together leaders working at the intersection of these fields to provide a timely update on the state-of-the-art. Themes covered will include synthetic biology in extreme conditions, microbial interactions, designing biology and microbial factories. Together the session will provide an exciting overview of the field which looks set to make a significant impact on industrial biotechnology as well as more fundamental microbiology research.
Theme 1: The Synthetic and Systems Biology in Extreme Conditions. This session includes talks on aspects of synthetic and systems approaches in extreme environments and microbes.
Theme 2: Synthetic and Systems Approaches to Microbial Interactions. The ways in which microbes interact plays an influential role in their behaviour both in hosts and in industrial fermenters. This session takes a look at how we can interrogate the basis of these interactions and will be of interest to those exploring microbiomes and industrial biotechnology.
Theme 3: Designing Biology. In this session we will explore the importance of design of synthetic systems from the perspectives of both artists and scientists. What can we design and why?
Theme 4: Microbial Cell Factories. This session will include a range of experts who are using synthetic biology approaches to design new-generation cell factories using microalgal host strains. It will be of interest to a range of delegates interested in industrial biotechnology and will complement the talks on other chassis, e.g. Saccharomyces in the other parts of the session.

ORGANISERS

Meriem El Karoui (University of Edinburgh, UK), Teuta Pilizota (University of Edinburgh, UK), Susan Rosser (University of Edinburgh, UK), Colin Robinson (University of Kent, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Metabolic engineering of microalgae as green cell factories

14:00 - 14:30

Metabolic engineering of microalgae as green cell factories

Enginering of cyanobacteria for production of high-value products: optimization of electron transport and metabolon formation

14:30 - 15:00

Enginering of cyanobacteria for production of high-value products: optimization of electron transport and metabolon formation

Offered oral - Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis with a heterologous electron sink

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis with a heterologous electron sink

Offered oral - Microalgae as cell factories: synthetic transfer RNA genes as genetic engineering tools for the Chlamydomonas reindardtii chloroplast

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Microalgae as cell factories: synthetic transfer RNA genes as genetic engineering tools for the Chlamydomonas reindardtii chloroplast

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Plug and play – developing tuneable gene expression in microalgae using synthetic biology approaches

16:00 - 16:30

Plug and play – developing tuneable gene expression in microalgae using synthetic biology approaches

Synthesis of anti-bacterial proteins using the Chlamydomonas chloroplast as a production platform

16:30 - 17:00

Synthesis of anti-bacterial proteins using the Chlamydomonas chloroplast as a production platform

Offered oral - Novel synthetic biology approaches for high-value compound production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Novel synthetic biology approaches for high-value compound production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Offered oral - High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Virus workshop: Clinical Virology Network

Lunch

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Hepatitis in pregnancy

14:00 - 14:30

Hepatitis in pregnancy

Evidence base for treating neonates and progress towards universal screening for congenital CMV infection

14:30 - 15:00

Evidence base for treating neonates and progress towards universal screening for congenital CMV infection

CVN business

15:00 - 15:30

CVN business

Exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Exhibition and refreshments

Commercial representatives presentations

16:00 - 16:30

Commercial representatives presentations

Zika virus

16:30 - 17:00

Zika virus

RSV infections - are we any closer to an immunisation programme?

17:00 - 17:30

RSV infections - are we any closer to an immunisation programme?

Live at Lunch: Scientific Publishing Networking

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Scientific Publishing Networking

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Prokaryotic genetics and genomics forum

Offered papers on all aspects of the genes and genomes of prokaryotes and their mobile elements will be considered, including their sequencing, transcription, translation, regulation, chromosome dynamics, gene transfer, population genetics and evolution, taxonomy and systematics, comparative genomics, metagenomics, bioinformatics, and synthetic biology.

ORGANISERS

Lori Snyder (Kingston University, UK), Ryan Seipke (University of Leeds, UK), Thorsten Allers (University of Nottingham, UK)

Chair : Lori Snyder

The genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi

14:00 - 14:30

The genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi

Offered oral - Increasing the number of replication origins in Escherichia coli is surprisingly problematic for chromosomal replication

14:30 - 14:45

Offered oral - Increasing the number of replication origins in Escherichia coli is surprisingly problematic for chromosomal replication

Chair : Thorsten Allers

Offered oral - Contrasting evolutionary fortunes for prophages in an epidemic Salmonella lineage

14:45 - 15:00

Offered oral - Contrasting evolutionary fortunes for prophages in an epidemic Salmonella lineage

Offered oral - Staged induction of toxin expression and export in Vibrio cholerae

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Staged induction of toxin expression and export in Vibrio cholerae

Offered oral - Genomic bases of long-term adaptation to environmental conditions in two major representatives of the marine bacterial phytoplankton, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Genomic bases of long-term adaptation to environmental conditions in two major representatives of the marine bacterial phytoplankton, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Ryan Seipke

Offered oral - A structurally complex anti-σ factor from Bacillus subtilis plays a key role in sensing acidic growth conditions

16:00 - 16:15

Offered oral - A structurally complex anti-σ factor from Bacillus subtilis plays a key role in sensing acidic growth conditions

Offered oral - The in vivo RNA interactome of the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - The in vivo RNA interactome of the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis

Offered oral - Diverse mechanisms of compensatory evolution promote plasmid maintenance in bacterial communities

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Diverse mechanisms of compensatory evolution promote plasmid maintenance in bacterial communities

Chair : Lori Snyder

Offered oral - Evolution of host specificity and virulence of Pseudomonas syringae on Prunus

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Evolution of host specificity and virulence of Pseudomonas syringae on Prunus

Offered oral - Regulation of arsenite oxidation by the AioXSR sensory transduction system of Rhizobium sp. str. NT-26

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Regulation of arsenite oxidation by the AioXSR sensory transduction system of Rhizobium sp. str. NT-26

Offered oral - Regulation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence by the master regular, AggR

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Regulation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence by the master regular, AggR

Scientific Publishing: How to review scientific manuscripts

Most reviewers have not received any formal instruction or guidance in the analysis of the various components of a manuscript. This workshop will address how to critique a manuscript and how to write a report. This will be a beneficial workshop for those who are seeking to improve their skills in reviewing manuscripts for scientific journals as part of the peer-review process. In addition, it would help in understanding of requirements for successful publication of manuscripts. The targeted audience will include post-doctoral fellows, and early-career scientists. At the end of the workshop, the participants will: • Understand the rigorous process of peer-review in scientific publishing, • Understand what editors are looking for from their reviewers upon invitation to review, • Have the opportunity to meet and network with well-published editors • Have the opportunity to review an article • Have the opportunity to ask questions and receive feedback

ORGANISERS

Norman Fry and Kalai Mathee (both Journal of Medical Microbiology, UK)

Participants' self-introduction to rest of group

14:00 - 14:20

Participants' self-introduction to rest of group

Why should you review?

14:20 - 14:30

Why should you review?

Review components I – Title, Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods

14:30 - 15:15

Review components I – Title, Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods

Review components II – Results, Discussion, References, Acknowledgement, Figures, Tables

15:15 - 16:30

Review components II – Results, Discussion, References, Acknowledgement, Figures, Tables

Reporting back to the Editor

16:30 - 16:40

Reporting back to the Editor

Backend of publication

16:40 - 16:45

Backend of publication

Conclude and wrap up

16:45 - 16:55

Conclude and wrap up

One-to-one session with reviewers

16:55 - 17:30

One-to-one session with reviewers

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

17:40 - 18:30

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

An Audience with... Professor Michael Rossmann

19:00 - 19:30

An Audience with... Professor Michael Rossmann

Wednesday 05 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:30 - 08:45

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:30 - 08:45

Registration

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

09:00 - 09:50

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

Aquatic microbiology: New model organisms and new challenges

We will review our current understanding on aquatic microbial communities (protists, bacteria, viruses), including their ecological roles in the oceans, their diversity, functions and behaviours but also their heir origins and evolution. The session will be divided into two parts: in the first part, we will discuss the different genetic models that have been developed for marine microeukaryotes/protists, based on the recent initiative from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on “Increasing the Potential of Marine Microeukaryotes as Experimental Model Systems through the Development of Genetic Tools”. The second session will examine the diversity, ecology and evolution of various groups of organisms within these aquatic ecosystems and review the current status quo and potential future applications, which will allow us to deeply understand the complexity and relations of the aquatic micro-organisms in these ecosystems.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Montagnes (University of Liverpool, UK)

Using tintinnid ciliates as a model group to uncover biodiversity patterns in marine microbes

10:00 - 10:30

Using tintinnid ciliates as a model group to uncover biodiversity patterns in marine microbes

Gregarine apicomplexan parasites of deep-sea invertebrates

10:30 - 11:00

Gregarine apicomplexan parasites of deep-sea invertebrates

Assuming Arrhenius?

11:00 - 11:30

Assuming Arrhenius?

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Nutrient recycling facilitates long-term stability of microbial phototroph–heterotroph interactions in marine systems

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Nutrient recycling facilitates long-term stability of microbial phototroph–heterotroph interactions in marine systems

Offered oral -Prokaryotic niche partitioning in suspended versus sinking marine particles

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral -Prokaryotic niche partitioning in suspended versus sinking marine particles

Is plankton a plankton a plankton: overcoming challenges of species-specificity in plankton behavior and physiology to derive general patterns

12:30 - 13:00

Is plankton a plankton a plankton: overcoming challenges of species-specificity in plankton behavior and physiology to derive general patterns

Epigenetics and non-coding RNA

Important functions for noncoding RNAs are currently being revealed in organisms belonging to all domains of life. These include regulation of gene expression via chromatin remodeling, transcriptional interference and altered transcript stability. This session will address the global analysis and evolution of microbial noncoding RNAs, their regulation, mechanism of action, and their place in synthetic biology. The emerging evidence that microbes can take-up RNA from their immediate environment will be addressed, as well as the biology of small ncRNAs that shuttle between eukaryotic microbes and their hosts in cross-kingdom missions of defense and counter defense.

ORGANISERS

Susan Crosthwaite (University of Manchester, UK), Daniela Delneri (University of Manchester, UK), Ian Roberts (Institute of Food Research, UK)

Translating the epitranscriptome

10:00 - 10:30

Translating the epitranscriptome

tRNA neochromosome – a party chromosome in the synthetic yeast genome

10:30 - 11:00

tRNA neochromosome – a party chromosome in the synthetic yeast genome

Flash talks

11:00 - 11:15

Flash talks

Flash talks

11:15 - 11:30

Flash talks

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Challenges and opportunities of ribosomal DNA-micro-heterogeneity detection and analysis in yeast NGS datasets

12:00 - 12:30

Challenges and opportunities of ribosomal DNA-micro-heterogeneity detection and analysis in yeast NGS datasets

Evolution and function of intron sequences in yeast

12:30 - 13:00

Evolution and function of intron sequences in yeast

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

In the natural environment or human body, microbes are seldom found in isolation. Rather, they tend to occur in complex communities, each exquisitely adapted and able to respond to the specific environmental conditions. Heterogeneity – microbial, spatial and metabolic – is a characteristic of all communities. In the first stages of development of a microbial population on a surface, substratum recognition – involving surface structure, composition, and microbial adhesins – is key. Then intermicrobial communication processes such as quorum sensing, metabolic dependencies, genetic exchange, and synergistic or antagonistic events, orchestrate development of the overall population. Such interactions often extend beyond the boundaries of microbial classification, resulting in the formation of polymicrobial communities, with interplay between bacteria, fungi and/or viruses. These communities are dynamic, exhibiting spatio-temporal variation and continual adaptation to micro-environments within the population. Better understanding of such complexity presents huge challenges, yet is essential for us in the future to be able to control a spectrum of microbial community associated events in medicine, dentistry, agriculture and industry. We are only in the initial stages of uncovering the secrets of what these communities contain, how they may affect the environment and disease progression, the implications for antimicrobial development, and how we may exploit them for our benefit. Nonetheless, with advances in imaging and -omics technologies, mathematical modelling and combining forces from multiple disciplines, we are making new discoveries about these populations. This session aims to bring together world leaders in the study of complex communities from the prokaryotic, virology and eukaryotic divisions to summarise recent advances in this rapidly expanding area of research, and to identify future ambitions for the field.

ORGANISERS

Angela Nobbs (University of Bristol, UK), Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK), Rebecca Hall (University of Birmingham, UK) and Kim Hardie (University of Nottingham, UK)

Unravelling autotransporter interactions in biofilms

10:00 - 10:30

Unravelling autotransporter interactions in biofilms

Offered oral - Optimisation of biofilm models to facilitate the monitoring of antimicrobial penetration

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Optimisation of biofilm models to facilitate the monitoring of antimicrobial penetration

Tuning interaction forces for positioning within biofilms

10:45 - 11:15

Tuning interaction forces for positioning within biofilms

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:15 - 11:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The effect of surface topography on microbial adhesion

11:45 - 12:15

The effect of surface topography on microbial adhesion

Offered oral - Laboratory X-ray microtomography as a tool for 3D visualization of biofilm in porous media made up of zeolite

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Laboratory X-ray microtomography as a tool for 3D visualization of biofilm in porous media made up of zeolite

Distribution and structure of biofilms in clinical specimens – a paradox emerging

12:30 - 13:00

Distribution and structure of biofilms in clinical specimens – a paradox emerging

Microbial genomics: From single cells to large populations

Microbial genomics has matured into a distinct discipline, and now influences most other areas of microbiology. The ability to generate, with relative ease, individual and population microbial genome data sets has facilitated new insights into microbial evolution, phylogeography, epidemiology and outbreaks as well as allowing the development of novel approaches to measure and model how genetic variation impacts on phenotype variation. In this symposium we will bring together world leading speakers to present the very latest research encompassing how microbial genomics is developing beyond initial glimpses of microbial diversity, to the next stages of research in this maturing field. Presentations will cover very fine scale resolution mapping of evolutionary dynamics from large population studies. The symposium will then move on to show how we can go back to biology with such genomic data sets, using tools such as genome wide association studies (GWAS) to elucidate biological differences within and between populations. Finally, we will look at cutting edge approaches that allow us to study the impact of genome variation between individual cells within populations, and the evolutionary events occurring in single cells or single infected cells. Talks will be built around these overarching themes and not around any specific microbe. We will also highlight approaches and technologies that have been used in other systems that may also be relevant/applicable to microbial genomics with biology at the focal point.

ORGANISERS

Nicholas Thomson (Sanger Institute, UK), Alan McNally (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Sam Sheppard (University of Bath, UK)

Origins of pandemic cholera from environmental gene pools (and its fate within patients)

10:00 - 10:30

Origins of pandemic cholera from environmental gene pools (and its fate within patients)

Towards a deep understanding of microbial evolution from genomes

10:30 - 11:00

Towards a deep understanding of microbial evolution from genomes

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

LUCA and the Universal tree of life: breaking the phylogenetic impasses

11:30 - 12:00

LUCA and the Universal tree of life: breaking the phylogenetic impasses

Offered oral - Comparative analyses of selection operating on non-translated intergenic regions of diverse bacterial species using whole genome sequence data

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Comparative analyses of selection operating on non-translated intergenic regions of diverse bacterial species using whole genome sequence data

Offered oral - How does bacterial genetic background potentiate the evolution of antibiotic resistance?

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - How does bacterial genetic background potentiate the evolution of antibiotic resistance?

Disentangling the fragmented evolutionary history of prokaryotes

12:30 - 13:00

Disentangling the fragmented evolutionary history of prokaryotes

Microbial physiology, metabolism and molecular mechanisms forum

This forum will consider offered papers on all aspects of prokaryotic metabolism and physiology, including fundamental research on the biochemistry and structure of prokaryotic cells, cell growth and division, cell architecture and differentiation, synthesis and transport of macromolecules, ions and small molecules and the cell cycle; but also on the role of physiology in microbial engineering, signalling and communication, sensing and cellular responses, the molecular mechanisms behind these phenomena and their potential applications.

ORGANISERS

Steve Michell (University of Exeter, UK), Sarah Kuehne (University of Birmingham, UK)

Bacterial hydrogen metabolism: a link to the dawn of time, and a role in a sustainable future

10:00 - 10:30

Bacterial hydrogen metabolism: a link to the dawn of time, and a role in a sustainable future

Offered oral - Regulation and function of the Escherichia coli Rtc RNA repair system

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Regulation and function of the Escherichia coli Rtc RNA repair system

Offered oral - Modelling the metabolism of the tsetse microbiome

10:45 - 11:00

Offered oral - Modelling the metabolism of the tsetse microbiome

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Investigating the link between the gut microbiota and the brain through mass spectometry imaging

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Investigating the link between the gut microbiota and the brain through mass spectometry imaging

Offered oral - Dissecting the structural and catalytic role of a symmetric ferroxidase centre in encapsulated ferritins

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Dissecting the structural and catalytic role of a symmetric ferroxidase centre in encapsulated ferritins

Offered oral - In vitro induction of Salmonella typhimurium into viable but non-culturable state, its characterisation and relevance to infection

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - In vitro induction of Salmonella typhimurium into viable but non-culturable state, its characterisation and relevance to infection

Offered oral - Novel regulators of gas vesicle, flagellum and antibiotic production in Serratia

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Novel regulators of gas vesicle, flagellum and antibiotic production in Serratia

Offered oral - The glyoxylate shunt as a target for antibacterial intervention in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - The glyoxylate shunt as a target for antibacterial intervention in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Offered oral - Transcriptional control of primary carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Transcriptional control of primary carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas

Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

The availability of antiviral small molecules and vaccines has historically lagged behind those targeting bacteria. Accordingly, the public health issues represented by both common and emerging virus infections are considerable, with effective treatments lacking in many cases. Research aimed at translating laboratory findings into either novel or improved anti-viral strategies is therefore a priority. This workshop will highlight ongoing research into burgeoning therapies for important human and animal viral pathogens, encompassing all stages of therapeutic development ranging from the test tube to in vivo studies. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Stephen Griffin (University of Leeds, UK), Silke Schepelemann (NIBSC, UK)

Offered oral - Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus replication through disruption of lipid homeostasis

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus replication through disruption of lipid homeostasis

Offered oral - Determine the molecular and biophysical importance of phospholipids on the avian influenza virus infectivity

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Determine the molecular and biophysical importance of phospholipids on the avian influenza virus infectivity

Offered oral - Detecting neuraminidase antibodies using influenza NA pseudotyped lentiviruses

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Detecting neuraminidase antibodies using influenza NA pseudotyped lentiviruses

Offered oral - Phenotypic changes in cell-passaged H3N2 influenza isolates – implications for serology testing and development of improved assay

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Phenotypic changes in cell-passaged H3N2 influenza isolates – implications for serology testing and development of improved assay

Offered oral - Towards small-molecule entry inhibitors of BK polyomavirus infection

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Towards small-molecule entry inhibitors of BK polyomavirus infection

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Targeting host cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) as potential anti-viral therapeutics against polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Targeting host cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) as potential anti-viral therapeutics against polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

Offered oral - A comprehensive comparison of different strategies to create attenuated genomes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV): Live-cell imaging analyses using fluorescent FMDV replicons

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - A comprehensive comparison of different strategies to create attenuated genomes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV): Live-cell imaging analyses using fluorescent FMDV replicons

Offered oral - Mycobacterium ulcerans mouse model refinement for pre-clinical profiling of vaccine candidates

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Mycobacterium ulcerans mouse model refinement for pre-clinical profiling of vaccine candidates

Offered oral - Developing anti-cancer vaccine vectors

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Developing anti-cancer vaccine vectors

Offered oral - Activation of in vitro immune responses using a novel lentiviral vector

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Activation of in vitro immune responses using a novel lentiviral vector

Offered oral - Modular cell-based platform for high throughput identification of compounds that target a viral interferon antagonist of choice: Identification of novel compounds that inhibit respiratory syncytial virus NS2 and human cytomegalovirus IE1

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Modular cell-based platform for high throughput identification of compounds that target a viral interferon antagonist of choice: Identification of novel compounds that inhibit respiratory syncytial virus NS2 and human cytomegalovirus IE1

Offered oral - Preclinical characterization of PC786, a novel inhaled respiratory syncytial virus specific non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Preclinical characterization of PC786, a novel inhaled respiratory syncytial virus specific non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor

Virus workshop: Clinical Virology Network

Real world outcomes of DAA therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the HCV Research UK National cohort

10:00 - 10:12

Real world outcomes of DAA therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the HCV Research UK National cohort

Serum plasma proteins associated with acute Hanta virus infection in a pregnant woman

10:12 - 10:24

Serum plasma proteins associated with acute Hanta virus infection in a pregnant woman

Whole-genome sequencing of adenovireus in immunocompromised paediatric patients directly from clinical samples elucidates molecular epidemiology

10:24 - 10:36

Whole-genome sequencing of adenovireus in immunocompromised paediatric patients directly from clinical samples elucidates molecular epidemiology

Development of next generation sequencing as routine diagnostics in UCLH: challenges and opportunities on influenza virus

10:36 - 10:48

Development of next generation sequencing as routine diagnostics in UCLH: challenges and opportunities on influenza virus

Hepatitis E virus: Whole genome sequencing as a new tool for understanding HEV epidemiology and phenotypes in Europe

10:48 - 11:00

Hepatitis E virus: Whole genome sequencing as a new tool for understanding HEV epidemiology and phenotypes in Europe

DisCVR: Rapid viral diagnosis from NGS data

11:00 - 11:30

DisCVR: Rapid viral diagnosis from NGS data

Screening for chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection using a commercial antigen assay and a novel neutralisation test confirming specifity

11:30 - 11:42

Screening for chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection using a commercial antigen assay and a novel neutralisation test confirming specifity

An investigation of Epstein-Barr virus gene regulation and host immune response in prospectively collected blood specimens from paediatric liver and multi-visceral transplant recipients

11:42 - 11:54

An investigation of Epstein-Barr virus gene regulation and host immune response in prospectively collected blood specimens from paediatric liver and multi-visceral transplant recipients

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:54 - 12:24

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Metagenomic viral sequencing for non-targeted pathogen identification

12:24 - 12:36

Metagenomic viral sequencing for non-targeted pathogen identification

Deep sequencing for diagnosis of encephalitis

12:36 - 12:48

Deep sequencing for diagnosis of encephalitis

Varied Ebola virus (EBOV) neutralising antibody responses in convalescent plasma

12:48 - 13:00

Varied Ebola virus (EBOV) neutralising antibody responses in convalescent plasma

Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

Virus evolution can affect important characteristics such as replication host range, tropism, and pathogenesis. On the other hand, there are constraints imposed by nucleotide sequences and proteins they encode. This workshop will address questions related to these topics. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Erica Bickerton (The Pirbright Institute, UK), Adrian Fox (FERA, UK)

Offered oral - Archaeogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee to human zoonotic transmission of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2)

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Archaeogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee to human zoonotic transmission of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2)

Offered oral - Finishing two novel Shearwaterpox viruses from Pacific shearwaters unveils deep recombination among Avipoxviruses

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Finishing two novel Shearwaterpox viruses from Pacific shearwaters unveils deep recombination among Avipoxviruses

Offered oral - Environmental bacteriophages isolated against Dickeya solani

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Environmental bacteriophages isolated against Dickeya solani

Offered oral - Counting host switches during the evolution of human-infective RNA viruses

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Counting host switches during the evolution of human-infective RNA viruses

Offered oral - Comparative analysis of mammalian viruses found in human and animal enteric samples from Vietnam

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Comparative analysis of mammalian viruses found in human and animal enteric samples from Vietnam

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - PCR sequencing of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus genome reflects quasi-species variation defined by next-generation sequencing

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - PCR sequencing of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus genome reflects quasi-species variation defined by next-generation sequencing

Offered oral - Using next-generation sequencing to investigate HIV-1 transmission

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - Using next-generation sequencing to investigate HIV-1 transmission

Offered oral - Characterisation of novel Alphacoronaviruses in European rodents and shrews

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Characterisation of novel Alphacoronaviruses in European rodents and shrews

Offered oral - Deformed wing virus diversity: identification of sequences associated with disease in a globally-distributed viral pathogen of honey bees

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Deformed wing virus diversity: identification of sequences associated with disease in a globally-distributed viral pathogen of honey bees

Offered oral - Detecting human cytomegalovirus recombination signatures in clinical samples

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Detecting human cytomegalovirus recombination signatures in clinical samples

Offered oral - Ebola glycoprotein mutations: from branched amino acid to branched phylogeny tree

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Ebola glycoprotein mutations: from branched amino acid to branched phylogeny tree

Offered oral - IBV selection versus mutation: development of a whole genome sequencing protocol for IBV

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - IBV selection versus mutation: development of a whole genome sequencing protocol for IBV

Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

This workshop will focus on the regulation of viral and host gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by virally-encoded factors and address how viruses control the replication of their genomes. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Gill Elliott (University of Surrey, UK), Jo Parish (University of Birmingham, UK)

Offered oral - Mutations within a predicted FFAT-like domain in foot-and-mouth disease virus 3A and the effects on viral replication

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Mutations within a predicted FFAT-like domain in foot-and-mouth disease virus 3A and the effects on viral replication

Offered oral - Investigating the essential role of the nsP3 macro domain in Chikungunya virus replication

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Investigating the essential role of the nsP3 macro domain in Chikungunya virus replication

Offered oral - Structural and biochemical analysis of protein/RNA interactions during initiation of dengue virus genome replication

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Structural and biochemical analysis of protein/RNA interactions during initiation of dengue virus genome replication

Offered oral - Altering the CG content of the HIV-1 gag sequence attenuates viral replication

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Altering the CG content of the HIV-1 gag sequence attenuates viral replication

Offered oral - The role of structured RNA in Chikungunya virus genome replication

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - The role of structured RNA in Chikungunya virus genome replication

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Illuminating the non-structural protein organisation of hepatitis C virus replication complexes: a super-resolution microscopy approach

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Illuminating the non-structural protein organisation of hepatitis C virus replication complexes: a super-resolution microscopy approach

Offered oral - Investigating the mechanisms by which ANP32 proteins support infuenza A polymerase function

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - Investigating the mechanisms by which ANP32 proteins support infuenza A polymerase function

Offered oral - Modulation of chloride channels inhibit Chikungunya virus genome replication

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Modulation of chloride channels inhibit Chikungunya virus genome replication

Offered oral - Dependency of HIV-1 replication on the glycolytic metabolism of primary CD4+ T cells

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Dependency of HIV-1 replication on the glycolytic metabolism of primary CD4+ T cells

Offered oral - CTCF regulates differentiation-dependent HPV gene expression

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - CTCF regulates differentiation-dependent HPV gene expression

Offered oral - EBNA-LP enables Epstein-Barr virus gene expression by facilitating transcription factor recruitment to viral genomes early after infection

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - EBNA-LP enables Epstein-Barr virus gene expression by facilitating transcription factor recruitment to viral genomes early after infection

Offered oral - Characterisation of the human cytomegalovirus US12 family gene products

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Characterisation of the human cytomegalovirus US12 family gene products

Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

Understanding disease development mechanistically at the cellular, genetic and whole organism level is a vital element in the development of novel therapeutic strategies such as vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. To this end, this workshop will serve as a forum for the presentation of new and exciting data pertaining to all aspects of the pathogenesis of virus infection. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

James Stewart (University of Liverpool, UK), Andrew Macdonald (University of Leeds, UK)

Offered oral - Human norovirus infection of primary human B cells

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Human norovirus infection of primary human B cells

Offered oral - HPV E5 oncoprotein interacts with the pro-apoptotic PRAF2 protein

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - HPV E5 oncoprotein interacts with the pro-apoptotic PRAF2 protein

Offered oral - A Staphylococcus aureus protein enhances influenza A virus replication

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - A Staphylococcus aureus protein enhances influenza A virus replication

Offered oral - Investigating changes to the host cell proteome during BK polyomavirus infection

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Investigating changes to the host cell proteome during BK polyomavirus infection

Offered oral - Delay of hepatic differentiation induced by hepatitis C virus infection

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Delay of hepatic differentiation induced by hepatitis C virus infection

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Murine Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type central and peripheral nervous system co-cultures reveal early cell targets of Brazilian isolate ZIKV infection

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Murine Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type central and peripheral nervous system co-cultures reveal early cell targets of Brazilian isolate ZIKV infection

Offered oral - KLK6-mediated degradation of Keratin10 is commonly employed by skin-tropic viruses to propagate in skin and is required for blister formation in VZV infection

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - KLK6-mediated degradation of Keratin10 is commonly employed by skin-tropic viruses to propagate in skin and is required for blister formation in VZV infection

Offered oral - Transcriptome analysis of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma and similarities with human lung adenocarcinoma

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Transcriptome analysis of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma and similarities with human lung adenocarcinoma

Offered oral - CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to human cytomegalovirus proteins expressed by latently infected cells

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to human cytomegalovirus proteins expressed by latently infected cells

Offered oral - Swine influenza infectiousness and transmission: identifying new biomarkers

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Swine influenza infectiousness and transmission: identifying new biomarkers

Offered oral - Merkel cell polyomavirus small tumour antigen expression is sufficient to drive an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Merkel cell polyomavirus small tumour antigen expression is sufficient to drive an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

Offered oral - Do pathogenic simian immunodeficiency viruses bypass live attenuated vaccine protection through extension of the breadth of cells they infect?

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Do pathogenic simian immunodeficiency viruses bypass live attenuated vaccine protection through extension of the breadth of cells they infect?

Wednesday 05 April, Afternoon

Aquatic microbiology: New model organisms and new challenges

We will review our current understanding on aquatic microbial communities (protists, bacteria, viruses), including their ecological roles in the oceans, their diversity, functions and behaviours but also their heir origins and evolution. The session will be divided into two parts: in the first part, we will discuss the different genetic models that have been developed for marine microeukaryotes/protists, based on the recent initiative from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation on “Increasing the Potential of Marine Microeukaryotes as Experimental Model Systems through the Development of Genetic Tools”. The second session will examine the diversity, ecology and evolution of various groups of organisms within these aquatic ecosystems and review the current status quo and potential future applications, which will allow us to deeply understand the complexity and relations of the aquatic micro-organisms in these ecosystems.

ORGANISERS

Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Sonja Rueckert (Edinburgh Napier University, UK), David Montagnes (University of Liverpool, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Environmental impact assessment of salmon aquaculture using DNA barcoding of ciliates

14:00 - 14:30

Environmental impact assessment of salmon aquaculture using DNA barcoding of ciliates

Biosensing the annual bloom in the North Pacific

14:30 - 15:00

Biosensing the annual bloom in the North Pacific

Exploring the melting microbial frontiers of our frozen planet

15:00 - 15:30

Exploring the melting microbial frontiers of our frozen planet

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The pathobiome concept: an emerging view of the microbial dynamics of disease

16:00 - 16:30

The pathobiome concept: an emerging view of the microbial dynamics of disease

Offered oral - The role of cell and particle characteristics in the adhesion of E. coli to suspended intertidal sediments

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - The role of cell and particle characteristics in the adhesion of E. coli to suspended intertidal sediments

Offered oral - Desert dust source of iron to the globally important diazotroph Trichodesmium. A physiological and transcriptomic study

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Desert dust source of iron to the globally important diazotroph Trichodesmium. A physiological and transcriptomic study

Tracking tiny eukaryotic algae in the wild

17:00 - 17:30

Tracking tiny eukaryotic algae in the wild

Epigenetics and non-coding RNA

Important functions for noncoding RNAs are currently being revealed in organisms belonging to all domains of life. These include regulation of gene expression via chromatin remodeling, transcriptional interference and altered transcript stability. This session will address the global analysis and evolution of microbial noncoding RNAs, their regulation, mechanism of action, and their place in synthetic biology. The emerging evidence that microbes can take-up RNA from their immediate environment will be addressed, as well as the biology of small ncRNAs that shuttle between eukaryotic microbes and their hosts in cross-kingdom missions of defense and counter defense.

ORGANISERS

Susan Crosthwaite (University of Manchester, UK), Daniela Delneri (University of Manchester, UK), Ian Roberts (Institute of Food Research, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Cross-kingdom RNAi in plant–pathogen interactions

14:00 - 14:30

Cross-kingdom RNAi in plant–pathogen interactions

Abundant non-coding RNA involved in early Dictyostelium discoideum development is conserved in Dictyostelid social amoebae

14:30 - 15:00

Abundant non-coding RNA involved in early Dictyostelium discoideum development is conserved in Dictyostelid social amoebae

Presence of ncRNAs in yeast introns and their impact on maintenance of phenotype

15:00 - 15:30

Presence of ncRNAs in yeast introns and their impact on maintenance of phenotype

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

RNAi-directed epigenetic gene silencing

16:00 - 16:30

RNAi-directed epigenetic gene silencing

Small RNAs and heterochromatic regulation in fission yeast

16:30 - 17:00

Small RNAs and heterochromatic regulation in fission yeast

Offered oral - Secretion of small RNAs and an argonaute by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus: at the host interface

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Secretion of small RNAs and an argonaute by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus: at the host interface

Offered oral - Identification of small regulatory RNAs in Burkholderia cenocepacia

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Identification of small regulatory RNAs in Burkholderia cenocepacia

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

In the natural environment or human body, microbes are seldom found in isolation. Rather, they tend to occur in complex communities, each exquisitely adapted and able to respond to the specific environmental conditions. Heterogeneity – microbial, spatial and metabolic – is a characteristic of all communities. In the first stages of development of a microbial population on a surface, substratum recognition – involving surface structure, composition, and microbial adhesins – is key. Then intermicrobial communication processes such as quorum sensing, metabolic dependencies, genetic exchange, and synergistic or antagonistic events, orchestrate development of the overall population. Such interactions often extend beyond the boundaries of microbial classification, resulting in the formation of polymicrobial communities, with interplay between bacteria, fungi and/or viruses. These communities are dynamic, exhibiting spatio-temporal variation and continual adaptation to micro-environments within the population. Better understanding of such complexity presents huge challenges, yet is essential for us in the future to be able to control a spectrum of microbial community associated events in medicine, dentistry, agriculture and industry. We are only in the initial stages of uncovering the secrets of what these communities contain, how they may affect the environment and disease progression, the implications for antimicrobial development, and how we may exploit them for our benefit. Nonetheless, with advances in imaging and -omics technologies, mathematical modelling and combining forces from multiple disciplines, we are making new discoveries about these populations. This session aims to bring together world leaders in the study of complex communities from the prokaryotic, virology and eukaryotic divisions to summarise recent advances in this rapidly expanding area of research, and to identify future ambitions for the field.

ORGANISERS

Angela Nobbs (University of Bristol, UK), Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK), Rebecca Hall (University of Birmingham, UK) and Kim Hardie (University of Nottingham, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Experimental evolution in biofilms to understand adaptation during infections

14:00 - 14:30

Experimental evolution in biofilms to understand adaptation during infections

The Candida albicans biofilm life-style: adaptation to hypoxia and adhesion

14:30 - 15:00

The Candida albicans biofilm life-style: adaptation to hypoxia and adhesion

Parallel evolution in bacterial biofilm development

15:00 - 15:30

Parallel evolution in bacterial biofilm development

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Modelling multiple strain C. difficile infection

16:00 - 16:30

Modelling multiple strain C. difficile infection

Offered oral - Killing by type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation, favouring the evolution of cooperation

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Killing by type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation, favouring the evolution of cooperation

Offered oral - Complex metabolic traits regulate biofilm heterogeneity in Candida albicans

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Complex metabolic traits regulate biofilm heterogeneity in Candida albicans

The ecology of the microbiome: Networks, competitionl, and stability

17:00 - 17:30

The ecology of the microbiome: Networks, competitionl, and stability

Microbial genomics: From single cells to large populations

Microbial genomics has matured into a distinct discipline, and now influences most other areas of microbiology. The ability to generate, with relative ease, individual and population microbial genome data sets has facilitated new insights into microbial evolution, phylogeography, epidemiology and outbreaks as well as allowing the development of novel approaches to measure and model how genetic variation impacts on phenotype variation. In this symposium we will bring together world leading speakers to present the very latest research encompassing how microbial genomics is developing beyond initial glimpses of microbial diversity, to the next stages of research in this maturing field. Presentations will cover very fine scale resolution mapping of evolutionary dynamics from large population studies. The symposium will then move on to show how we can go back to biology with such genomic data sets, using tools such as genome wide association studies (GWAS) to elucidate biological differences within and between populations. Finally, we will look at cutting edge approaches that allow us to study the impact of genome variation between individual cells within populations, and the evolutionary events occurring in single cells or single infected cells. Talks will be built around these overarching themes and not around any specific microbe. We will also highlight approaches and technologies that have been used in other systems that may also be relevant/applicable to microbial genomics with biology at the focal point.

ORGANISERS

Nicholas Thomson (Sanger Institute, UK), Alan McNally (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Sam Sheppard (University of Bath, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Using genomics to understand the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus

14:00 - 14:30

Using genomics to understand the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus

Genomic changes and ecological contexts associated with emerging bacterial infections

14:30 - 15:00

Genomic changes and ecological contexts associated with emerging bacterial infections

Sequential waves of sexually transmitted shigellosis in men who have sex with men drive by common determinants of antimicrobial resistance

15:00 - 15:30

Sequential waves of sexually transmitted shigellosis in men who have sex with men drive by common determinants of antimicrobial resistance

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Within host evolution of cystic fibrosis pathogens

16:00 - 16:30

Within host evolution of cystic fibrosis pathogens

Offered oral - An evolutionary genomic history of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - An evolutionary genomic history of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland

Offered oral - The Legionella genus genome: A global view of the genus evolution

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - The Legionella genus genome: A global view of the genus evolution

Structure, evolution and transmission of Enterococcus faecium populations

17:00 - 17:30

Structure, evolution and transmission of Enterococcus faecium populations

Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

The availability of antiviral small molecules and vaccines has historically lagged behind those targeting bacteria. Accordingly, the public health issues represented by both common and emerging virus infections are considerable, with effective treatments lacking in many cases. Research aimed at translating laboratory findings into either novel or improved anti-viral strategies is therefore a priority. This workshop will highlight ongoing research into burgeoning therapies for important human and animal viral pathogens, encompassing all stages of therapeutic development ranging from the test tube to in vivo studies. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Stephen Griffin (University of Leeds, UK), Silke Schepelemann (NIBSC, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Offered oral - Investigation into the role of the S1 and S2 subunit of the coronavirus IVB S gene in inducing a protective immune response

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Investigation into the role of the S1 and S2 subunit of the coronavirus IVB S gene in inducing a protective immune response

Offered oral - Analysis of the tropism of recombinant infectious bronchitis viruses and their ability to confer protection against homologous challenge

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Analysis of the tropism of recombinant infectious bronchitis viruses and their ability to confer protection against homologous challenge

Offered oral - The antigenic relationships of outer coat protein VP2, between distinct bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - The antigenic relationships of outer coat protein VP2, between distinct bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes

Offered oral - Replication-deficient strains: insights into the next generation of bluetongue virus vaccines

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Replication-deficient strains: insights into the next generation of bluetongue virus vaccines

Offered oral - Assembly of defective African horse sickness virus particles: rational design of vaccines for all serotypes

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Assembly of defective African horse sickness virus particles: rational design of vaccines for all serotypes

Offered oral - Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replication

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replication

Offered oral - Turning up the heat on flaviviruses: Hsp70 inhibitors with potent antiviral activity against diverse flaviviruses in primary human dendritic cells

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Turning up the heat on flaviviruses: Hsp70 inhibitors with potent antiviral activity against diverse flaviviruses in primary human dendritic cells

Offered oral - Broad spectrum antiviral activity of arbidol extends to hemorrhagic fever viruses and Zika virus

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Broad spectrum antiviral activity of arbidol extends to hemorrhagic fever viruses and Zika virus

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - A novel moo-noclonal antibody platform: from antibody to vaccine design, and back again

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - A novel moo-noclonal antibody platform: from antibody to vaccine design, and back again

Offered oral - Human parainfluenza 3: an effective in vitro model for therapeutic candidates

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Human parainfluenza 3: an effective in vitro model for therapeutic candidates

Offered oral - Parallel HCV culture systems reveal differences in the development of NS5A inhibitor resistance by genotype 3

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Parallel HCV culture systems reveal differences in the development of NS5A inhibitor resistance by genotype 3

Offered oral - The massive decline of clinically relevant high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in Scotland

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - The massive decline of clinically relevant high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in Scotland

Virus workshop: Clinical Virology Network

Lunch

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Commercial representatives presentations

14:00 - 14:30

Commercial representatives presentations

Neglected tropical viruses

14:30 - 15:00

Neglected tropical viruses

Blood borne virus infection in organ donors

15:00 - 15:30

Blood borne virus infection in organ donors

Gastroenteritis virus surveillance and management

15:30 - 16:00

Gastroenteritis virus surveillance and management

Exhibition and refreshments

16:00 - 17:30

Exhibition and refreshments

Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

This workshop will focus on the regulation of viral and host gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by virally-encoded factors and address how viruses control the replication of their genomes. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Gill Elliott (University of Surrey, UK), Jo Parish (University of Birmingham, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Offered oral - FMDV replication is dependent on alternative mutually-exclusive polyprotein processing pathways

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - FMDV replication is dependent on alternative mutually-exclusive polyprotein processing pathways

Offered oral - The viral 2A peptide has an extended conformation in the ribosomal exit tunnel

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - The viral 2A peptide has an extended conformation in the ribosomal exit tunnel

Offered oral - Anti-splicing drugs inhibit HPV16 E2 protein expression during the human papillomavirus replication cycle

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Anti-splicing drugs inhibit HPV16 E2 protein expression during the human papillomavirus replication cycle

Offered oral - Cis-acting RNA sequences regulate HIV-1 envelope and Vpu translation

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Cis-acting RNA sequences regulate HIV-1 envelope and Vpu translation

Offered oral - Insights into the mechanism of apoptosis inhibition by the viral BCL-2 homologue, BHRF1

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Insights into the mechanism of apoptosis inhibition by the viral BCL-2 homologue, BHRF1

Offered oral - Genetic analysis of the relationship between EBNA3C-RBPJ interaction and gene regulation during Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Genetic analysis of the relationship between EBNA3C-RBPJ interaction and gene regulation during Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells

Offered oral - Inter-segment RNA–RNA interactions mediate genome segment packaging in the rotaviruses and other members of the Reoviridae

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Inter-segment RNA–RNA interactions mediate genome segment packaging in the rotaviruses and other members of the Reoviridae

Offered oral - Rational attentuation of murine norovirus by mutations in the multifunctional capsid shell domain

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Rational attentuation of murine norovirus by mutations in the multifunctional capsid shell domain

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Transcriptomic signatures differentiate survival from fatal outcomes in humans infected with Ebola virus

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Transcriptomic signatures differentiate survival from fatal outcomes in humans infected with Ebola virus

Offered oral - Functional analysis of the cell-cycle regulator RGC-32 in EBV-infected cells

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Functional analysis of the cell-cycle regulator RGC-32 in EBV-infected cells

Offered oral - Novel insights into diseases of T and NK cells caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Novel insights into diseases of T and NK cells caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection

Offered oral - The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein employs STAT2/3- and nucleosome-dependent mechanisms to mediate viral reactivation from latency

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein employs STAT2/3- and nucleosome-dependent mechanisms to mediate viral reactivation from latency

Offered oral - BCL3 acts as a host cell restriction factor for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - BCL3 acts as a host cell restriction factor for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation

Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

Understanding disease development mechanistically at the cellular, genetic and whole organism level is a vital element in the development of novel therapeutic strategies such as vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. To this end, this workshop will serve as a forum for the presentation of new and exciting data pertaining to all aspects of the pathogenesis of virus infection. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

James Stewart (University of Liverpool, UK), Andrew Macdonald (University of Leeds, UK)

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Offered oral - A role for serine phosphorylation in regulating the cellular interactions of NSSA

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - A role for serine phosphorylation in regulating the cellular interactions of NSSA

Offered oral - Characterisation of deformed wing virus growth in vitro and in vivo

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Characterisation of deformed wing virus growth in vitro and in vivo

Offered oral - The role of SPZ1 in high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-caused oncogenesis

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - The role of SPZ1 in high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-caused oncogenesis

Offered oral - Ribonucleoprotein structure in pathogenic Orthobunyaviruses

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Ribonucleoprotein structure in pathogenic Orthobunyaviruses

Offered oral - The extended open reading frame of the influenza NP protein in the 2009 pandemic strain contributes to pathogenicity

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - The extended open reading frame of the influenza NP protein in the 2009 pandemic strain contributes to pathogenicity

Offered oral - Are New World monkeys more susceptible to Zika virus?

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Are New World monkeys more susceptible to Zika virus?

Offered oral - JNK signalling is required during the human papillomavirus life cycle

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - JNK signalling is required during the human papillomavirus life cycle

Offered oral - A new type of viral RNA links 1918 influenza virus virulence to RNA polymerase activity

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - A new type of viral RNA links 1918 influenza virus virulence to RNA polymerase activity

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Oncolytic herpes virus (oHSV) cell killing in a three dimensional epithelial tumour cell culture system

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Oncolytic herpes virus (oHSV) cell killing in a three dimensional epithelial tumour cell culture system

Offered oral - Hepatitis C (HCV) E1E2 envelope glycoprotein can interfere with HIV-1 infection

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Hepatitis C (HCV) E1E2 envelope glycoprotein can interfere with HIV-1 infection

Offered oral - The impact of macrophage phenotype on the response to influenza A virus infection

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - The impact of macrophage phenotype on the response to influenza A virus infection

Offered oral - Dysregulation of microRNA expression in sheep lung following jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus infection

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - Dysregulation of microRNA expression in sheep lung following jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus infection

Offered oral - SNAP-tagged Chikungunya virus replicons improve visualisation of non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) by fluorescence microscopy

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - SNAP-tagged Chikungunya virus replicons improve visualisation of non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) by fluorescence microscopy

Offered oral - Characterisation of the role of the deubiquitylase USP45 in Chikungunya virus infection

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Characterisation of the role of the deubiquitylase USP45 in Chikungunya virus infection

Live at Lunch: Clinical cases in medical microbiology – an interactive session

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Clinical cases in medical microbiology – an interactive session

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Microbial cell surfaces

The last two decades have seen an explosion in our understanding of microbial cell surfaces; their structure, composition and function. Recent discoveries, coupled with unprecedented advances in our ability to visualise the cell surface and its dynamics are revolutionising the way in which we think about the cell envelope. Indeed, and now more than ever before, the cell surface is revealing itself to be far more than a simple physical interface with the environment. Not only is the cell surface the front line of defense against antibiotics and the host immune response; it is also involved in environmental sensing, the capture of nutrients and light, movement of the cell, interactions between cells, the formation of cellular communities, and intoxication of nearby competitor species. Not surprisingly, cell surface components have also been exploited as receptors by biological agents (including predatory bacteria; the Bdellovibrio sp.) that target bacteria for their own ends. The speakers in this session are world-leaders in their field who will bring the audience up to date with this fascinating, and highly adaptive, sub-cellular component.

ORGANISERS

Stephen Michell (University of Exeter, UK), Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK)

Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade through and modify Gram-negative bacterial cell surfaces

14:00 - 14:30

Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade through and modify Gram-negative bacterial cell surfaces

Structural and molecular biology of type IV secretion systems

14:30 - 15:00

Structural and molecular biology of type IV secretion systems

Offered oral - Intermembrane cross-talk in E. coli

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Intermembrane cross-talk in E. coli

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:15 - 15:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Lipoteichoic acid synthesis and function in Gram-positive bacteria

15:45 - 16:15

Lipoteichoic acid synthesis and function in Gram-positive bacteria

Offered oral - Clostridium difficile S-layer biogenesis and the role of the accessory sec secretion pathway

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Clostridium difficile S-layer biogenesis and the role of the accessory sec secretion pathway

Offered oral - Solving a 25-year-old mystery: Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Solving a 25-year-old mystery: Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division

Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

16:45 - 17:15

Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Virus workshop: Clinical virology

This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections. Contributions from early career researchers are particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Matthew Donnati (University of Bristol, UK), Miren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK)

Offered oral

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral

Offered oral

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral

Offered oral

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral

Offered oral

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral

Offered oral

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral

Offered oral

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral

Offered oral

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral

Offered oral

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral

Offered oral

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral

Offered oral

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral

Offered oral

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral

Offered oral

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral

Offered oral

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral

Offered oral

17:12 - 17:24

Offered oral

Virus workshop: Innate immunity

The innate immune system represents the first line of defence of all living organisms against infection, and in recent years our knowledge of the battle between viruses and innate immunity has increased substantially. This workshop will highlight novel host defence mechanisms and uncover a myriad of virus evasion strategies. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial where appropriate – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

Kate Bishop (The Francis Crick Institute, UK), Alain Kohl (MRC-Centre for Virology, UK)

Offered oral - Control of the innate immune response by the Sapovirus protease NS6

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Control of the innate immune response by the Sapovirus protease NS6

Offered oral - Evasion of host innate immunity by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) - V protein and its pathogenic consequences

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Evasion of host innate immunity by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) - V protein and its pathogenic consequences

Offered oral - Differential phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression in chicken and duck cells may explain the differences in antiviral response between these species

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Differential phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression in chicken and duck cells may explain the differences in antiviral response between these species

Offered oral - Adaptation of an avian-origin influenza A virus to a mammal involves key changes in NS1 function

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Adaptation of an avian-origin influenza A virus to a mammal involves key changes in NS1 function

Offered oral - TLR4 is implicated in respiratory syncytial virus infection and concomitant innate immune responses

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - TLR4 is implicated in respiratory syncytial virus infection and concomitant innate immune responses

Offered oral - The envelope gene of transmitted HIV-1 resists a late IFNy-induced block

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - The envelope gene of transmitted HIV-1 resists a late IFNy-induced block

Offered oral - Characterisation of the innate immune response to adeno-associated virus in the presence of neutralising antibodies

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Characterisation of the innate immune response to adeno-associated virus in the presence of neutralising antibodies

Offered oral - A multi-species comparison of vertebrate interferomes

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - A multi-species comparison of vertebrate interferomes

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - ISG expression screening reveals the genus-specific antibunyaviral activity of ISG20

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - ISG expression screening reveals the genus-specific antibunyaviral activity of ISG20

Offered oral - Structural elucidation of the rabies virus P-protein axis: The molecular basis for evasion of innate immunity

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Structural elucidation of the rabies virus P-protein axis: The molecular basis for evasion of innate immunity

Offered oral - Duck vs chicken: IFITM proteins as determinants of host susceptibility to avian influenza virus

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Duck vs chicken: IFITM proteins as determinants of host susceptibility to avian influenza virus

Offered oral - Resistance of transmitted founder HIV-1 to IFITM-mediated restriction

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - Resistance of transmitted founder HIV-1 to IFITM-mediated restriction

Offered oral - Inhibition of parainfluenza virus 5 ribonucleoprotein function by protein ISGylation

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - Inhibition of parainfluenza virus 5 ribonucleoprotein function by protein ISGylation

Offered oral - Spatial regulation of PML-NB mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Spatial regulation of PML-NB mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection

Virus workshop: Morphogenesis, egress and entry

The assembly of the virus particle, egress from the cell, receptor binding and uncoating are critical events in the life cycle of all viruses. This workshop will focus on the molecular mechanisms involved in these processes. The workshop will cover the breadth of virology – human, non-human animal, plant and bacterial – with contributions from early career researchers particularly welcomed.

ORGANISERS

David Evans (University of St Andrews, UK), Colin Crump (University of Cambridge, UK)

Offered oral - Dissection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry into hepatocytes, and identification of species-specific limitations

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Dissection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry into hepatocytes, and identification of species-specific limitations

Offered oral - Crystal structure of a distinct viral capsid/ssDNA complex illuminates how viruses assemble into infectious virions

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Crystal structure of a distinct viral capsid/ssDNA complex illuminates how viruses assemble into infectious virions

Offered oral - Structural and functional characterisation of calicivirus binding and entry

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Structural and functional characterisation of calicivirus binding and entry

Offered oral - The primary enveloped virion of herpes simplex virus 1 characterised by cryo-electron microscopy

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - The primary enveloped virion of herpes simplex virus 1 characterised by cryo-electron microscopy

Offered oral - Bioorthogonal chemical analysis of herpesvirus early genome transport and nuclear presentation

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Bioorthogonal chemical analysis of herpesvirus early genome transport and nuclear presentation

Offered oral - Agnoprotein is an essential egress factor during the BK polyomavirus life cycle

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Agnoprotein is an essential egress factor during the BK polyomavirus life cycle

Offered oral - Investigating cellular proteins involved in HSV-1 egress

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Investigating cellular proteins involved in HSV-1 egress

Offered oral - Close your eyes and count to 10: Insights into genome segment assortment in reovirus

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Close your eyes and count to 10: Insights into genome segment assortment in reovirus

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Bluetongue virus serotype 26 (BTV-26): an arbovirus that is not able to infect or replicate in a Culiocoides vector species

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Bluetongue virus serotype 26 (BTV-26): an arbovirus that is not able to infect or replicate in a Culiocoides vector species

Offered oral - Rewriting nature's ssRNA viral assembly manual

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Rewriting nature's ssRNA viral assembly manual

Offered oral - Packaging signal mediated assembly of enteroviruses

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Packaging signal mediated assembly of enteroviruses

Offered oral - In situ intranuclear herpesvirus capsid structure from frozen cells by cryo-eletron tomography

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - In situ intranuclear herpesvirus capsid structure from frozen cells by cryo-eletron tomography

Offered oral - The structural features of a Geminivirus particle revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - The structural features of a Geminivirus particle revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

Offered oral - Membrane permeability induced by foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP4

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Membrane permeability induced by foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP4

Offered oral - Effects of EGFR mutations during influenza A virus infection of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

17:12 - 17:24

Offered oral - Effects of EGFR mutations during influenza A virus infection of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

17:40 - 18:30

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

Society promotion

19:00 - 19:10

Society promotion

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)

20:30 - 23:30

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Thursday 06 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

08:15 - 09:15

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

08:15 - 09:15

Registration

Cell biology of pathogen entry into host cells

Intracellular pathogens have evolved many strategies to enter the cytoplasm of their hosts in order to replicate, assemble new progeny, and evade immune detection. Viruses and bacteria can subvert host cell behaviour in diverse ways, inducing or modifying the full compendium of cellular endocytic pathways and/or reprogramming normal maturation of cellular vesicular carriers and endomembrane systems. This session will bring together microbiologists and cell biologists who study pathogen entry, membrane trafficking, and pathogen-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement. The session will seek to emphasise how pathogens are the ideal tools to probe the function of host cell systems, define novel host-pathogen interactions and uncover possible targets for cell-based therapeutic intervention.

ORGANISERS

Gareth Bloomfield (University of Cambridge, UK), Jason King (University of Sheffield, UK), Jason Mercer (University College London, UK)

Manipulation of host membrane systems for productive poxvirus infection

09:00 - 09:30

Manipulation of host membrane systems for productive poxvirus infection

HIV-1 activates T cell signalling independently of antigen to drive viral spread

09:30 - 10:00

HIV-1 activates T cell signalling independently of antigen to drive viral spread

Offered oral - Fluorescent tracking of Bunyamwera virus in live cells reveals the requirement for cellular potassium channels during the early stages of the bunyavirus lifecycle

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Fluorescent tracking of Bunyamwera virus in live cells reveals the requirement for cellular potassium channels during the early stages of the bunyavirus lifecycle

Molecular mechanism of viral gene silencing by Morc2 and the human silencing hub

10:15 - 10:45

Molecular mechanism of viral gene silencing by Morc2 and the human silencing hub

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:45 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Breaking barriers: viral entry and infection of polarized cell surfaces

11:00 - 11:30

Breaking barriers: viral entry and infection of polarized cell surfaces

Substitutions in influenza hemagglutinin for cross-species transmission

11:30 - 12:00

Substitutions in influenza hemagglutinin for cross-species transmission

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Microbial cell surfaces

The last two decades have seen an explosion in our understanding of microbial cell surfaces; their structure, composition and function. Recent discoveries, coupled with unprecedented advances in our ability to visualise the cell surface and its dynamics are revolutionising the way in which we think about the cell envelope. Indeed, and now more than ever before, the cell surface is revealing itself to be far more than a simple physical interface with the environment. Not only is the cell surface the front line of defense against antibiotics and the host immune response; it is also involved in environmental sensing, the capture of nutrients and light, movement of the cell, interactions between cells, the formation of cellular communities, and intoxication of nearby competitor species. Not surprisingly, cell surface components have also been exploited as receptors by biological agents (including predatory bacteria; the Bdellovibrio sp.) that target bacteria for their own ends. The speakers in this session are world-leaders in their field who will bring the audience up to date with this fascinating, and highly adaptive, sub-cellular component.

ORGANISERS

Stephen Michell (University of Exeter, UK), Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK)

Bacterial motility: swimming and gliding

09:15 - 09:45

Bacterial motility: swimming and gliding

Offered oral - Mycobacterial cell surface hydrophobicity – a factor promoting bacterial aerosolisation and transmission of disease?

09:45 - 10:00

Offered oral - Mycobacterial cell surface hydrophobicity – a factor promoting bacterial aerosolisation and transmission of disease?

Building a morphologically complex bacterial biofilm – spatial organization of transcriptional control and c-di-GMP signalling in E. coli macrocolony biofilms

10:00 - 10:30

Building a morphologically complex bacterial biofilm – spatial organization of transcriptional control and c-di-GMP signalling in E. coli macrocolony biofilms

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division

11:00 - 11:30

Regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division

Light harvesting: a critical role for the surfaces of photosynthetic bacteria

11:30 - 12:00

Light harvesting: a critical role for the surfaces of photosynthetic bacteria

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Anaerobe 2017: molecular, genomic and metagenomic insights into anaerobic infection

Anaerobes, in the context of infection, are defined as requiring strict anaerobic conditions for isolation from clinical samples. This session will highlight insights obtained from metagenomic/whole-genome sequencing, molecular aspects of virulence and the impact of change in antimicrobial use in both medical and veterinary infection. Microbial community interactions will be considered in relation to: the ovine foot-rot microbiota and the key role of Dichelobacter nodosus; human oral microbiota changes and progression in periodontal disease; gut microbiota/Clostridum difficile interactions; and Propionibacterium acnes skin microbiota and human disease associations. Clostridium perfringens, classically associated with gas gangrene and lethal post-abortion septicaemia after unregulated pregnancy termination in humans, has emerged as a major cause of necrotising enteritis in poultry, linked with a ban on in-feed antibiotics. Similarly, reduction in antibiotic prescription for a ‘sore throat’ has been linked to the rise in Fusobacterium necrophorum infection, potentially lethal in healthy young adults. In contrast, increase in the use of metronidazole, for example in Helicobacter pylori eradication, may contribute to the spread of nim mediated resistance within the gut microbiota, leading to lethal multi-drug resistant Bacteroides fragilis infection in humans. The symposium will provide insight into current and emerging/re-emerging anaerobic infection of both medical and veterinary importance.

ORGANISERS

Sheila Patrick (Queen's University Belfast, UK), Sarah Kuehne (University of Birmingham, UK), Sabine Tötemeyer (University of Nottingham, UK)

Chair : Sheila Patrick

Clostridium perfringens-mediated myonecrosis: it is not all about toxins

09:30 - 10:00

Clostridium perfringens-mediated myonecrosis: it is not all about toxins

Dichelobacter nodosus in the interdigital skin: the primary instigator of inflammation in footrot or setting the scene for opportunists?

10:00 - 10:30

Dichelobacter nodosus in the interdigital skin: the primary instigator of inflammation in footrot or setting the scene for opportunists?

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

High frequency recombination in Bacteroides fragilis: diversity, virulence and antimicrobial resistance

10:45 - 11:15

High frequency recombination in Bacteroides fragilis: diversity, virulence and antimicrobial resistance

Offered oral - Microaerobiosis and intestinal epithelial contact influence virulence of enteroaggregative E. coli

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Microaerobiosis and intestinal epithelial contact influence virulence of enteroaggregative E. coli

FISHing anaerobes from mouth to gut: Who are the key players?

11:30 - 12:00

FISHing anaerobes from mouth to gut: Who are the key players?

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Critical health challenges in medical mycology

This session will highlight recent developments in the area of fungal pathogenesis and in particular the threats caused by emerging fungal pathogens. In addition to considering the molecular basis of pathogenicity, speakers will also explore the host-pathogen interaction, highlighting the challenges we face in tackling this increasing threat to global human health. By better understanding the pathobiology of fungal diseases, we will be able to generate new, more effective diagnostics, novel therapeutic approaches and new antifungal drugs. The session is being run jointly with the Medical Mycology and Fungal Immunology (MMFI) Consortium based at the University of Aberdeen. Early career researchers will be encouraged to present their recent findings through offered papers.

ORGANISERS

Mick Tuite (University of Kent, UK), Neil Gow (University of Aberdeen, UK)

New and improved tools in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

09:30 - 10:00

New and improved tools in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

Offered oral - Low titre Pneumocystis jirovecii infections: More than just colonization?

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Low titre Pneumocystis jirovecii infections: More than just colonization?

Offered oral - Candida albicans is a moving target for the immune system as it adapts to host signals

10:15 - 10:30

Offered oral - Candida albicans is a moving target for the immune system as it adapts to host signals

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Challenges in the treatment of non-Candida albicans infections: a preclinical perspective

10:45 - 11:15

Challenges in the treatment of non-Candida albicans infections: a preclinical perspective

Offered oral - Temporal and behavioural differences in phagocytosis of pathogenic fungi by peritoneal macrophages

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Temporal and behavioural differences in phagocytosis of pathogenic fungi by peritoneal macrophages

Offered oral - Counteracting nutritional immunity: zinc assimilation by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Counteracting nutritional immunity: zinc assimilation by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

Cryptococcus: cell invader and host hijacker

11:45 - 12:00

Cryptococcus: cell invader and host hijacker

Environmental and applied microbiology forum

Offered papers focusing on any area in microbial ecology, including (non-human) host–microbe communities and interactions, marine and freshwater microbiology, soil and geomicrobiology, and air-, cryo- and extremophile microbiology will be presented.

ORGANISERS

Ryan Seipke (University of Leeds, UK), Nicola Holden (The James Hutton Institute, UK)

Chair : Nicola Holden

Bacteria reactivate motility by repurposing a nitrogen regulatory system

09:30 - 10:00

Bacteria reactivate motility by repurposing a nitrogen regulatory system

Offered oral - Gene expression of sulfide-oxidising Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO during nitrate-mediated biocorrosion

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Gene expression of sulfide-oxidising Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO during nitrate-mediated biocorrosion

Offered oral - T4-like environmental phage ΦCBH8 "activates" ToxINPa-mediated "altruistic suicide" in Serratia

10:15 - 10:30

Offered oral - T4-like environmental phage ΦCBH8 "activates" ToxINPa-mediated "altruistic suicide" in Serratia

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Chair : Ryan Seipke

Offered oral - Comparative metabolomics of Antarctic and sub-Arctic Actinobacteria

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Comparative metabolomics of Antarctic and sub-Arctic Actinobacteria

Offered oral - Antarctica cyanobacteria: from Scott's discovery expedition to freshwater microbialites

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Antarctica cyanobacteria: from Scott's discovery expedition to freshwater microbialites

Offered oral - Responses of the soil microbiome to phosphate fertilisation in grassland

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Responses of the soil microbiome to phosphate fertilisation in grassland

Offered oral - Bioproduction of platform N-heterocycles using engineered E. coli strains

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Bioproduction of platform N-heterocycles using engineered E. coli strains

Epigenetics and non-coding RNA

Important functions for noncoding RNAs are currently being revealed in organisms belonging to all domains of life. These include regulation of gene expression via chromatin remodeling, transcriptional interference and altered transcript stability. This session will address the global analysis and evolution of microbial noncoding RNAs, their regulation, mechanism of action, and their place in synthetic biology. The emerging evidence that microbes can take-up RNA from their immediate environment will be addressed, as well as the biology of small ncRNAs that shuttle between eukaryotic microbes and their hosts in cross-kingdom missions of defense and counter defense.

ORGANISERS

Susan Crosthwaite (University of Manchester, UK), Daniela Delneri (University of Manchester, UK), Ian Roberts (Institute of Food Research, UK)

Nuclear RNA decay pathways aid rapid remodelling of gene expression in yeast

09:30 - 10:00

Nuclear RNA decay pathways aid rapid remodelling of gene expression in yeast

Non-coding transcription, gene expression and replication in yeast

10:00 - 10:30

Non-coding transcription, gene expression and replication in yeast

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Antisense transcription interference and the tight repression of genes in budding yeast

10:45 - 11:15

Antisense transcription interference and the tight repression of genes in budding yeast

Intergenic non-coding transcription utilises an RNA-based mechanism to drive transcriptional interference

11:15 - 11:45

Intergenic non-coding transcription utilises an RNA-based mechanism to drive transcriptional interference

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

In the natural environment or human body, microbes are seldom found in isolation. Rather, they tend to occur in complex communities, each exquisitely adapted and able to respond to the specific environmental conditions. Heterogeneity – microbial, spatial and metabolic – is a characteristic of all communities. In the first stages of development of a microbial population on a surface, substratum recognition – involving surface structure, composition, and microbial adhesins – is key. Then intermicrobial communication processes such as quorum sensing, metabolic dependencies, genetic exchange, and synergistic or antagonistic events, orchestrate development of the overall population. Such interactions often extend beyond the boundaries of microbial classification, resulting in the formation of polymicrobial communities, with interplay between bacteria, fungi and/or viruses. These communities are dynamic, exhibiting spatio-temporal variation and continual adaptation to micro-environments within the population. Better understanding of such complexity presents huge challenges, yet is essential for us in the future to be able to control a spectrum of microbial community associated events in medicine, dentistry, agriculture and industry. We are only in the initial stages of uncovering the secrets of what these communities contain, how they may affect the environment and disease progression, the implications for antimicrobial development, and how we may exploit them for our benefit. Nonetheless, with advances in imaging and -omics technologies, mathematical modelling and combining forces from multiple disciplines, we are making new discoveries about these populations. This session aims to bring together world leaders in the study of complex communities from the prokaryotic, virology and eukaryotic divisions to summarise recent advances in this rapidly expanding area of research, and to identify future ambitions for the field.

ORGANISERS

Angela Nobbs (University of Bristol, UK), Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK), Rebecca Hall (University of Birmingham, UK) and Kim Hardie (University of Nottingham, UK)

The contribution of extracellular DNA to the architecture of oral biofilms

09:30 - 10:00

The contribution of extracellular DNA to the architecture of oral biofilms

Offered oral - Pseudomonas aeruginosa can kill Candida albicans hyphae by mechanisms that require a functional type 3 secretion system

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Pseudomonas aeruginosa can kill Candida albicans hyphae by mechanisms that require a functional type 3 secretion system

Taking inspiration from the structure of bacterial biofilms

10:15 - 10:45

Taking inspiration from the structure of bacterial biofilms

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:45 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Filamentous fungal biofilms in drinking water distribution systems

11:00 - 11:30

Filamentous fungal biofilms in drinking water distribution systems

Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the respiratory tract

11:30 - 12:00

Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the respiratory tract

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Microbial genomics: From single cells to large populations

Microbial genomics has matured into a distinct discipline, and now influences most other areas of microbiology. The ability to generate, with relative ease, individual and population microbial genome data sets has facilitated new insights into microbial evolution, phylogeography, epidemiology and outbreaks as well as allowing the development of novel approaches to measure and model how genetic variation impacts on phenotype variation. In this symposium we will bring together world leading speakers to present the very latest research encompassing how microbial genomics is developing beyond initial glimpses of microbial diversity, to the next stages of research in this maturing field. Presentations will cover very fine scale resolution mapping of evolutionary dynamics from large population studies. The symposium will then move on to show how we can go back to biology with such genomic data sets, using tools such as genome wide association studies (GWAS) to elucidate biological differences within and between populations. Finally, we will look at cutting edge approaches that allow us to study the impact of genome variation between individual cells within populations, and the evolutionary events occurring in single cells or single infected cells. Talks will be built around these overarching themes and not around any specific microbe. We will also highlight approaches and technologies that have been used in other systems that may also be relevant/applicable to microbial genomics with biology at the focal point.

ORGANISERS

Nicholas Thomson (Sanger Institute, UK), Alan McNally (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Sam Sheppard (University of Bath, UK)

Studying bacterial gene expression during infection with RNA-seq

09:30 - 10:00

Studying bacterial gene expression during infection with RNA-seq

Watching antibiotic resistance evolve: the MEGA-plate

10:00 - 10:30

Watching antibiotic resistance evolve: the MEGA-plate

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Linking genomic islands and bacterial population dynamics

10:45 - 11:15

Linking genomic islands and bacterial population dynamics

Offered oral - Towards a true bacterial transcriptome: in vivo RNA-seq of an attaching and effacing pathogen

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Towards a true bacterial transcriptome: in vivo RNA-seq of an attaching and effacing pathogen

Microbial GWAS and the biology of infection

11:30 - 12:00

Microbial GWAS and the biology of infection

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 2

Control of expression of virus and host RNA during virus infection is fundamental to the life cycle of all viruses. RNA production is essential for virus replication, gene expression and manipulation of the host environment. Viruses have evolved complex mechanisms of transcription activation, control and termination including epigenetic regulation and recruitment of host factors to promoters and transcriptional enhancers. In addition, the production of non-coding RNAs is essential for some viruses to manipulate the cellular environment and support virus replication. Protein production often requires complex post-transcriptional processing of viral RNAs and nuclear export, facilitated by hijacking host cell systems. This two-day symposium will provide an overview of the regulation of virus transcription of diverse viruses and the many ways in which viruses manipulate cellular gene expression to support productive virus infection.

ORGANISERS

Colin Crump (University of Cambridge, UK), Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK), Silke Schepelmann (NIBSC, UK)

Targeting herpesvirus ribonucleoprotein particle assembly: a novel antiviral strategy

09:30 - 10:00

Targeting herpesvirus ribonucleoprotein particle assembly: a novel antiviral strategy

Molecular biology of flaviviruses

10:00 - 10:30

Molecular biology of flaviviruses

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The hijacking of host gene enhancers by Epstein-Barr virus and its role in lymphoma development

11:00 - 11:30

The hijacking of host gene enhancers by Epstein-Barr virus and its role in lymphoma development

Offered oral - Non-enveloped RNA viruses: escaping the endosome

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Non-enveloped RNA viruses: escaping the endosome

Offered oral - Spatiotemporal and biochemical analysis of nascent nuclear proteome and involvement of ICP22 during HSV-1 infection revealed by click chemistry

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Spatiotemporal and biochemical analysis of nascent nuclear proteome and involvement of ICP22 during HSV-1 infection revealed by click chemistry

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Thursday 06 April, Afternoon

Anaerobe 2017: molecular, genomic and metagenomic insights into anaerobic infection

Anaerobes, in the context of infection, are defined as requiring strict anaerobic conditions for isolation from clinical samples. This session will highlight insights obtained from metagenomic/whole-genome sequencing, molecular aspects of virulence and the impact of change in antimicrobial use in both medical and veterinary infection. Microbial community interactions will be considered in relation to: the ovine foot-rot microbiota and the key role of Dichelobacter nodosus; human oral microbiota changes and progression in periodontal disease; gut microbiota/Clostridum difficile interactions; and Propionibacterium acnes skin microbiota and human disease associations. Clostridium perfringens, classically associated with gas gangrene and lethal post-abortion septicaemia after unregulated pregnancy termination in humans, has emerged as a major cause of necrotising enteritis in poultry, linked with a ban on in-feed antibiotics. Similarly, reduction in antibiotic prescription for a ‘sore throat’ has been linked to the rise in Fusobacterium necrophorum infection, potentially lethal in healthy young adults. In contrast, increase in the use of metronidazole, for example in Helicobacter pylori eradication, may contribute to the spread of nim mediated resistance within the gut microbiota, leading to lethal multi-drug resistant Bacteroides fragilis infection in humans. The symposium will provide insight into current and emerging/re-emerging anaerobic infection of both medical and veterinary importance.

ORGANISERS

Sheila Patrick (Queen's University Belfast, UK), Sarah Kuehne (University of Birmingham, UK), Sabine Tötemeyer (University of Nottingham, UK)

Chair : Sabine Tötemeyer

Propionbacterium acnes typing: insights into disease association

13:00 - 13:30

Propionbacterium acnes typing: insights into disease association

Offered oral - Propionbacterium acnes infection of the prostate gland: a modifiable risk-factor for the development of prostate cancer?

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Propionbacterium acnes infection of the prostate gland: a modifiable risk-factor for the development of prostate cancer?

Offered oral - Characterisation of LuxS dependent biofilm formation by Clostridiodes difficile

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - Characterisation of LuxS dependent biofilm formation by Clostridiodes difficile

Clostridium difficile – microbiota interactions in a gut model

14:00 - 14:30

Clostridium difficile – microbiota interactions in a gut model

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in anaerobes: the Nim conundrum

14:45 - 15:15

Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in anaerobes: the Nim conundrum

Fusobacterium necrophorum: just a sore throat?

15:15 - 15:45

Fusobacterium necrophorum: just a sore throat?

Nidogens are therapeutic targets for the prevention of tetanus

15:45 - 16:15

Nidogens are therapeutic targets for the prevention of tetanus

Cell biology of pathogen entry into host cells

Intracellular pathogens have evolved many strategies to enter the cytoplasm of their hosts in order to replicate, assemble new progeny, and evade immune detection. Viruses and bacteria can subvert host cell behaviour in diverse ways, inducing or modifying the full compendium of cellular endocytic pathways and/or reprogramming normal maturation of cellular vesicular carriers and endomembrane systems. This session will bring together microbiologists and cell biologists who study pathogen entry, membrane trafficking, and pathogen-induced cytoskeletal rearrangement. The session will seek to emphasise how pathogens are the ideal tools to probe the function of host cell systems, define novel host-pathogen interactions and uncover possible targets for cell-based therapeutic intervention.

ORGANISERS

Gareth Bloomfield (University of Cambridge, UK), Jason King (University of Sheffield, UK), Jason Mercer (University College London, UK)

Offered oral - Intracellular invasion & carcinogenesis of an oral pathogen

13:00 - 13:15

Offered oral - Intracellular invasion & carcinogenesis of an oral pathogen

Offered oral - A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalization of Listeria monocytogenes

13:15 - 13:30

Offered oral - A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalization of Listeria monocytogenes

Offered oral - Regulation of the BLOC3- and Rab32-dependent anti-microbial (BRAM) pathway

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Regulation of the BLOC3- and Rab32-dependent anti-microbial (BRAM) pathway

Legionella pneumophila targets the host sphingolipid metabolism and manipulates autophagy

13:45 - 14:15

Legionella pneumophila targets the host sphingolipid metabolism and manipulates autophagy

New roles for the cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity

14:15 - 14:45

New roles for the cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity

Refreshments

14:45 - 15:15

Refreshments

Viral genome hide and seek: encapsidation versus host immunity

15:15 - 15:30

Viral genome hide and seek: encapsidation versus host immunity

The HIV glycan shield

15:30 - 16:00

The HIV glycan shield

Entry and uncoating strategies followed by animal viruses

16:00 - 16:30

Entry and uncoating strategies followed by animal viruses

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

In the natural environment or human body, microbes are seldom found in isolation. Rather, they tend to occur in complex communities, each exquisitely adapted and able to respond to the specific environmental conditions. Heterogeneity – microbial, spatial and metabolic – is a characteristic of all communities. In the first stages of development of a microbial population on a surface, substratum recognition – involving surface structure, composition, and microbial adhesins – is key. Then intermicrobial communication processes such as quorum sensing, metabolic dependencies, genetic exchange, and synergistic or antagonistic events, orchestrate development of the overall population. Such interactions often extend beyond the boundaries of microbial classification, resulting in the formation of polymicrobial communities, with interplay between bacteria, fungi and/or viruses. These communities are dynamic, exhibiting spatio-temporal variation and continual adaptation to micro-environments within the population. Better understanding of such complexity presents huge challenges, yet is essential for us in the future to be able to control a spectrum of microbial community associated events in medicine, dentistry, agriculture and industry. We are only in the initial stages of uncovering the secrets of what these communities contain, how they may affect the environment and disease progression, the implications for antimicrobial development, and how we may exploit them for our benefit. Nonetheless, with advances in imaging and -omics technologies, mathematical modelling and combining forces from multiple disciplines, we are making new discoveries about these populations. This session aims to bring together world leaders in the study of complex communities from the prokaryotic, virology and eukaryotic divisions to summarise recent advances in this rapidly expanding area of research, and to identify future ambitions for the field.

ORGANISERS

Angela Nobbs (University of Bristol, UK), Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK), Rebecca Hall (University of Birmingham, UK) and Kim Hardie (University of Nottingham, UK)

Polymicrobial infections: Building walls and making the host pay

13:00 - 13:30

Polymicrobial infections: Building walls and making the host pay

Studies on the virome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reveal novel dsRNA elements and mild hypervirulence

13:30 - 14:00

Studies on the virome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reveal novel dsRNA elements and mild hypervirulence

The endobacterium of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus: bacterial genetic determinants tell us about physiology and co-evolution of an ancient association

14:00 - 14:30

The endobacterium of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus: bacterial genetic determinants tell us about physiology and co-evolution of an ancient association

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

14:45 - 15:15

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

Offered oral - Molecular basis of pathogenic group B Streptococcus interactions with fungus Candida albicans

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Molecular basis of pathogenic group B Streptococcus interactions with fungus Candida albicans

Molecular analysis of complex bacterial–fungal interactions

15:30 - 16:00

Molecular analysis of complex bacterial–fungal interactions

Microbial cell surfaces

The last two decades have seen an explosion in our understanding of microbial cell surfaces; their structure, composition and function. Recent discoveries, coupled with unprecedented advances in our ability to visualise the cell surface and its dynamics are revolutionising the way in which we think about the cell envelope. Indeed, and now more than ever before, the cell surface is revealing itself to be far more than a simple physical interface with the environment. Not only is the cell surface the front line of defense against antibiotics and the host immune response; it is also involved in environmental sensing, the capture of nutrients and light, movement of the cell, interactions between cells, the formation of cellular communities, and intoxication of nearby competitor species. Not surprisingly, cell surface components have also been exploited as receptors by biological agents (including predatory bacteria; the Bdellovibrio sp.) that target bacteria for their own ends. The speakers in this session are world-leaders in their field who will bring the audience up to date with this fascinating, and highly adaptive, sub-cellular component.

ORGANISERS

Stephen Michell (University of Exeter, UK), Martin Welch (University of Cambridge, UK)

Type VI secretion system-mediated neighbor predation fosters horizontal gene transfer in Vibrio cholerae

13:00 - 13:30

Type VI secretion system-mediated neighbor predation fosters horizontal gene transfer in Vibrio cholerae

Offered oral - Poacic acid and echinocandins inhibit fungal β-1,3-glucan synthesis via alternative mechanisms

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Poacic acid and echinocandins inhibit fungal β-1,3-glucan synthesis via alternative mechanisms

Cellulose – an extracellular matrix component of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms of many talents

13:45 - 14:15

Cellulose – an extracellular matrix component of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms of many talents

Offered oral - Coordination of cell wall synthesis and outer membrane constriction during E. coli cell division

14:15 - 14:30

Offered oral - Coordination of cell wall synthesis and outer membrane constriction during E. coli cell division

Refreshments

14:30 - 15:00

Refreshments

Cracking the crystal shell: S-layer structure and function

15:00 - 15:30

Cracking the crystal shell: S-layer structure and function

Offered oral - Expression of the Escherichia coli cell division zipA gene at different growth rates

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Expression of the Escherichia coli cell division zipA gene at different growth rates

Bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics

15:45 - 16:15

Bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics

Offered oral - Regulation of Enterococcus faecalis cell chain length is required for virulence in the zebrafish model of infection

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Regulation of Enterococcus faecalis cell chain length is required for virulence in the zebrafish model of infection

Microbial genomics: From single cells to large populations

Microbial genomics has matured into a distinct discipline, and now influences most other areas of microbiology. The ability to generate, with relative ease, individual and population microbial genome data sets has facilitated new insights into microbial evolution, phylogeography, epidemiology and outbreaks as well as allowing the development of novel approaches to measure and model how genetic variation impacts on phenotype variation. In this symposium we will bring together world leading speakers to present the very latest research encompassing how microbial genomics is developing beyond initial glimpses of microbial diversity, to the next stages of research in this maturing field. Presentations will cover very fine scale resolution mapping of evolutionary dynamics from large population studies. The symposium will then move on to show how we can go back to biology with such genomic data sets, using tools such as genome wide association studies (GWAS) to elucidate biological differences within and between populations. Finally, we will look at cutting edge approaches that allow us to study the impact of genome variation between individual cells within populations, and the evolutionary events occurring in single cells or single infected cells. Talks will be built around these overarching themes and not around any specific microbe. We will also highlight approaches and technologies that have been used in other systems that may also be relevant/applicable to microbial genomics with biology at the focal point.

ORGANISERS

Nicholas Thomson (Sanger Institute, UK), Alan McNally (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Sam Sheppard (University of Bath, UK)

100 years after William Bateson – what can we learn about epistasis by today's statistical machine learning?

13:00 - 13:30

100 years after William Bateson – what can we learn about epistasis by today's statistical machine learning?

Offered oral - Large recombination events readily occuring in biofilm cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Large recombination events readily occuring in biofilm cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Offered oral - High resolution genomic view of cholera within Dhaka city

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - High resolution genomic view of cholera within Dhaka city

Interleukin-22 signalling in hiPSC-derived intestinal organoids

14:00 - 14:30

Interleukin-22 signalling in hiPSC-derived intestinal organoids

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Microfluidics and virtual microfluidics for microbial genome sequencing

14:45 - 15:15

Microfluidics and virtual microfluidics for microbial genome sequencing

Offered oral - Use of machine-learning (SVM) for source attribution of Salmonella typhymurium and Escherichia coli

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Use of machine-learning (SVM) for source attribution of Salmonella typhymurium and Escherichia coli

Using single-cell transcriptomics to understand cellular heterogeneity

15:30 - 16:00

Using single-cell transcriptomics to understand cellular heterogeneity

Regulation of RNA expression during virus infection – part 2

Control of expression of virus and host RNA during virus infection is fundamental to the life cycle of all viruses. RNA production is essential for virus replication, gene expression and manipulation of the host environment. Viruses have evolved complex mechanisms of transcription activation, control and termination including epigenetic regulation and recruitment of host factors to promoters and transcriptional enhancers. In addition, the production of non-coding RNAs is essential for some viruses to manipulate the cellular environment and support virus replication. Protein production often requires complex post-transcriptional processing of viral RNAs and nuclear export, facilitated by hijacking host cell systems. This two-day symposium will provide an overview of the regulation of virus transcription of diverse viruses and the many ways in which viruses manipulate cellular gene expression to support productive virus infection.

ORGANISERS

Colin Crump (University of Cambridge, UK), Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK), Silke Schepelmann (NIBSC, UK)

Liver specific microRNA-122: Biogenesis and role in hepatitis C virus replication

13:00 - 13:30

Liver specific microRNA-122: Biogenesis and role in hepatitis C virus replication

Offered oral - The gene expression signatures of model human cell lines infected with the Ebola virus, Makona variant or Reston virus

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - The gene expression signatures of model human cell lines infected with the Ebola virus, Makona variant or Reston virus

Offered oral - Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells: Potential targets for therapy in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells: Potential targets for therapy in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Systems biology analysis of lytic HSV-1 infection

14:00 - 14:30

Systems biology analysis of lytic HSV-1 infection

Sunday 02 April, Afternoon

Registration

16:00 - 20:00

Registration

Pre-Conference networking workshop

18:00 - 20:00

Pre-Conference networking workshop

Monday 03 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:00 - 09:15

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:00 - 09:00

Registration

Open Address

09:30 - 09:50

Open Address

Welcome and introduction of the Protistology-UK Society

10:00 - 10:30

Welcome and introduction of the Protistology-UK Society

How convection, electrons, protons and photons drove the first microbes into being

10:00 - 10:30

How convection, electrons, protons and photons drove the first microbes into being

Delivery systems and adjuvants for enhanced oral vaccination

10:00 - 10:30

Delivery systems and adjuvants for enhanced oral vaccination

The molecular basis of metabolic cycles

10:00 - 10:30

The molecular basis of metabolic cycles

Genome and virulence regulatory mechanisms of Dickeya zeae

10:00 - 10:30

Genome and virulence regulatory mechanisms of Dickeya zeae

Length regulation in a bacterial cell-surface nanomachine: ordered export and assembly in the bacterial flagellum

10:00 - 10:30

Length regulation in a bacterial cell-surface nanomachine: ordered export and assembly in the bacterial flagellum

TBC

10:00 - 10:30

TBC

A photosynthetic amoeba and a symbiont-harboring trypanosomatid help to elucidate molecular mechanisms that underlie host–endosymbiont interactions

10:30 - 11:00

A photosynthetic amoeba and a symbiont-harboring trypanosomatid help to elucidate molecular mechanisms that underlie host–endosymbiont interactions

New insights into ancient molecular fossils: Reinterpreting 2-methylhopanes

10:30 - 11:00

New insights into ancient molecular fossils: Reinterpreting 2-methylhopanes

TBC

10:30 - 11:00

TBC

A Day in the Life of a Cyanobacterium: integrating temporal and environmental information

10:30 - 11:00

A Day in the Life of a Cyanobacterium: integrating temporal and environmental information

Fungi challenge global food security

10:30 - 11:00

Fungi challenge global food security

Assembly of an antibacterial speargun: the type VI secretion system

10:30 - 11:00

Assembly of an antibacterial speargun: the type VI secretion system

Using bacteriophages to make novel nano-scale devices

10:30 - 11:00

Using bacteriophages to make novel nano-scale devices

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

On the origins of heredity in protocells

11:00 - 11:30

On the origins of heredity in protocells

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Welcome to the session

11:00 - 11:05

Welcome to the session

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Your career – what next?

11:05 - 13:00

Your career – what next?

Endosymbiotic relationships in anaerobic eukaryotes

11:30 - 12:00

Endosymbiotic relationships in anaerobic eukaryotes

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - The role of USP7 in influenza virus entry

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - The role of USP7 in influenza virus entry

Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation

11:30 - 12:00

Circadian clock regulation of mRNA translation

Elucidating and re-designing regulatory networks underlying plant–pathogen interaction

11:30 - 12:00

Elucidating and re-designing regulatory networks underlying plant–pathogen interaction

Photorhabdus virulence cassettes: a nano-syringe based toxin secretion and delivery system

11:30 - 12:00

Photorhabdus virulence cassettes: a nano-syringe based toxin secretion and delivery system

Offered oral - Design of a low-cost, automated photobioreactor for control of bacterial optogentic circuit and synthetic circuit characterization

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Design of a low-cost, automated photobioreactor for control of bacterial optogentic circuit and synthetic circuit characterization

Offered oral - Zika virus and the chamber of secrets: unravelling virus–host immune response interactions

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Zika virus and the chamber of secrets: unravelling virus–host immune response interactions

Offered oral - Sustainable microbiological production of the next-generation material graphene

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Sustainable microbiological production of the next-generation material graphene

Possible hijacking of the host plastids by an intracellular parasite (Amoebophyra spp., Syndiniales) of microalgae

12:00 - 12:30

Possible hijacking of the host plastids by an intracellular parasite (Amoebophyra spp., Syndiniales) of microalgae

Geomycology: metals, minerals and fungi

12:00 - 12:30

Geomycology: metals, minerals and fungi

Can rotavirus vaccine performance improve in the populations worst affected?

12:00 - 12:30

Can rotavirus vaccine performance improve in the populations worst affected?

Zeitgebers, the circadian clock and microbial cultures

12:00 - 12:30

Zeitgebers, the circadian clock and microbial cultures

Regulation of enzyme production in soft rot enterobacteria

12:00 - 12:30

Regulation of enzyme production in soft rot enterobacteria

The Tat protein export pathway

12:00 - 12:30

The Tat protein export pathway

Flash poster

12:00 - 12:05

Flash poster

Flash poster

12:05 - 12:10

Flash poster

Flash poster

12:10 - 12:15

Flash poster

Synthetic systems inspired by genetic regulation

12:15 - 12:45

Synthetic systems inspired by genetic regulation

Manipulation of mammalian and amoeba cellular processes by the AnkB effector of Legionella pneumophila

12:30 - 13:00

Manipulation of mammalian and amoeba cellular processes by the AnkB effector of Legionella pneumophila

Turning sunlight into stone: how plants and microorganisms use an oxalate-carbonate pathway to trap CO2

12:30 - 13:00

Turning sunlight into stone: how plants and microorganisms use an oxalate-carbonate pathway to trap CO2

Offered oral - The impact of influenza A virus morphology on the inhibitory effect of respiratory mucus

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - The impact of influenza A virus morphology on the inhibitory effect of respiratory mucus

Microbial manipulation of animal behavior: how biological clocks could be involved

12:30 - 13:00

Microbial manipulation of animal behavior: how biological clocks could be involved

The threat to plant health from invasive alien Phytophthora species

12:30 - 13:00

The threat to plant health from invasive alien Phytophthora species

Mechanism of action of Tc toxins

12:30 - 13:00

Mechanism of action of Tc toxins

Offered oral - Synthesising a conformationally stable PV-1 empty capsid vaccine

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Synthesising a conformationally stable PV-1 empty capsid vaccine

Monday 03 April, Afternoon

Antibiotics Unearthed – Posters showcase

13:00 - 14:00

Antibiotics Unearthed – Posters showcase

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Live at Lunch: Microbiology Careers Networking

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Microbiology Careers Networking

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Offered oral - Reconstruction of ancient plastid proteome reveals the origins and fate of complex plastid lineages

14:00 - 14:15

Offered oral - Reconstruction of ancient plastid proteome reveals the origins and fate of complex plastid lineages

Exploring the deep terrestrial hydrosphere and biosphere

14:00 - 14:30

Exploring the deep terrestrial hydrosphere and biosphere

Epidemiology of gastrointestinal tract viral infections

14:00 - 14:30

Epidemiology of gastrointestinal tract viral infections

Parasite offence or host defence? The roles of biological rhythms in malaria infection

14:00 - 14:30

Parasite offence or host defence? The roles of biological rhythms in malaria infection

Delivery and activity of Phytophthora effectors that suppress plant immunity

14:00 - 14:30

Delivery and activity of Phytophthora effectors that suppress plant immunity

Microbiology careers case studies

14:00 - 15:30

Microbiology careers case studies

A tail of phage and tubeworms: How do bacteria mediate animal development?

14:00 - 14:30

A tail of phage and tubeworms: How do bacteria mediate animal development?

Engineering synthetic microbial communities for understanding and applications

14:00 - 14:30

Engineering synthetic microbial communities for understanding and applications

Offered oral - Multidisciplinary investigation on two "Candidatus fokinia" (Rickettsiales) endosymbionts of Paramecium

14:15 - 14:30

Offered oral - Multidisciplinary investigation on two "Candidatus fokinia" (Rickettsiales) endosymbionts of Paramecium

Environmental context dependence in a photosynthetic endosymbiosis

14:30 - 15:00

Environmental context dependence in a photosynthetic endosymbiosis

On thin ice: glacier microbiology

14:30 - 15:00

On thin ice: glacier microbiology

Rotavirus disease mechanisms: the gut–nerve–brain cross-talk

14:30 - 15:00

Rotavirus disease mechanisms: the gut–nerve–brain cross-talk

Metabolic cycles in yeast share features conserved among circadian rhythms

14:30 - 15:00

Metabolic cycles in yeast share features conserved among circadian rhythms

Regulation of receptor kinase-mediated immune signaling

14:30 - 15:00

Regulation of receptor kinase-mediated immune signaling

Structural and functional analysis of type III secretion systems

14:30 - 15:00

Structural and functional analysis of type III secretion systems

Flash talk

14:30 - 14:35

Flash talk

Flash talk

14:35 - 14:40

Flash talk

Offered oral - A platform to study meta-population dynamics of bacterial populations

14:40 - 14:55

Offered oral - A platform to study meta-population dynamics of bacterial populations

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

14:55 - 15:25

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

The biology of giant DNA viruses such as mimivirus and the biodiversity of the marine microbial world

15:00 - 15:30

The biology of giant DNA viruses such as mimivirus and the biodiversity of the marine microbial world

Unexpected facets of marine nitrifiers

15:00 - 15:30

Unexpected facets of marine nitrifiers

Identification of cis and trans acting factors involved in the norovirus life cycle

15:00 - 15:30

Identification of cis and trans acting factors involved in the norovirus life cycle

Dynamics of light-induced transcription in Neurospora

15:00 - 15:30

Dynamics of light-induced transcription in Neurospora

Offered oral - Flagellin application perturbs the microbiota thriving thriving at the barley-root soil interface

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Flagellin application perturbs the microbiota thriving thriving at the barley-root soil interface

Offered oral - Engineering and exploiting flotation – gas vesicle production in enterobacteria

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Engineering and exploiting flotation – gas vesicle production in enterobacteria

Offered oral - Using bacteria to fight bacteria: Parasitisation of ferredoxin-uptake receptors in Pectobacterium

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Using bacteria to fight bacteria: Parasitisation of ferredoxin-uptake receptors in Pectobacterium

Offered oral - Allosteric regulation of secretory system ATPases by the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Allosteric regulation of secretory system ATPases by the second messenger cyclic-di-GMP

Systems approaches to studying regulatory networks of bacterial plasmids

15:25 - 15:55

Systems approaches to studying regulatory networks of bacterial plasmids

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag expression and virion production by SR proteins

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Regulation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Gag expression and virion production by SR proteins

Offered oral - Frequency doubling in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Frequency doubling in the cyanobacterial circadian clock

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

CV workshop

15:30 - 17:00

CV workshop

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:45 - 16:15

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:45 - 16:15

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

A crosstalk between mutually exclusive cell fates moves biofilms

15:55 - 16:25

A crosstalk between mutually exclusive cell fates moves biofilms

Offered oral - Comparative transcriptomics reveals the effect of the bacterial endosymbiont Caedibacter taeniospiralis on Paramecium tetraurelia host gene expression

16:00 - 16:15

Offered oral - Comparative transcriptomics reveals the effect of the bacterial endosymbiont Caedibacter taeniospiralis on Paramecium tetraurelia host gene expression

Anoxygenic photosynthesis, photoreactions from femtoseconds to millenia

16:00 - 16:30

Anoxygenic photosynthesis, photoreactions from femtoseconds to millenia

Plant–virus interactions: the role of sub-nuclear structures

16:00 - 16:30

Plant–virus interactions: the role of sub-nuclear structures

Molecular mechanism of type IV pilus assembly

16:00 - 16:30

Molecular mechanism of type IV pilus assembly

Offered oral - Insight into the life-cycles of important bivalve parasites using lineage-specific molecular probing

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Insight into the life-cycles of important bivalve parasites using lineage-specific molecular probing

Offered oral - An essential role for the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 during non-canonical autophagy in influenza virus infection

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - An essential role for the WD40 domain of ATG16L1 during non-canonical autophagy in influenza virus infection

Rhythms, replication and pathogenesis: The circadian clock and virus infection

16:15 - 16:45

Rhythms, replication and pathogenesis: The circadian clock and virus infection

What determines the spatial structure of bacterial biofilms and aggregates?

16:25 - 16:55

What determines the spatial structure of bacterial biofilms and aggregates?

Environmental sampling to identify novel emergent microsporidian parasite lineages

16:30 - 17:00

Environmental sampling to identify novel emergent microsporidian parasite lineages

Offered oral - Identity and functional relationships of sediment and bacterial interactions in the sub-glacial basal ice ecosystem of the Svínafellsjökull glacier (S.E. Iceland)

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Identity and functional relationships of sediment and bacterial interactions in the sub-glacial basal ice ecosystem of the Svínafellsjökull glacier (S.E. Iceland)

Glycan interactions in gastroenteric viruses – implications for host tropism, host adaptation, susceptibility to infection, neutralization, and zoonosis

16:30 - 17:00

Glycan interactions in gastroenteric viruses – implications for host tropism, host adaptation, susceptibility to infection, neutralization, and zoonosis

A sleigh ride through the SNO: Role of S-nitrosylation in plant immunity

16:30 - 17:00

A sleigh ride through the SNO: Role of S-nitrosylation in plant immunity

Understanding functions of the type VII secretion systems

16:30 - 17:00

Understanding functions of the type VII secretion systems

Offered oral - Microbial and bioelectrochemical recovery of metals from wastewater

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Microbial and bioelectrochemical recovery of metals from wastewater

Offered oral - Peripheral host rhythms drive rhythms of malaria parasites

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Peripheral host rhythms drive rhythms of malaria parasites

Offered oral - Understanding the mechanism of action of novel rumen-derived antimicrobial peptides against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

16:55 - 17:10

Offered oral - Understanding the mechanism of action of novel rumen-derived antimicrobial peptides against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus

Symbiosis: new perspectives from eukaryotic endosymbionts within pathogenic amoebae

17:00 - 17:30

Symbiosis: new perspectives from eukaryotic endosymbionts within pathogenic amoebae

The microbial methane cycle

17:00 - 17:30

The microbial methane cycle

The influence of commensal bacteria on norovirus infection

17:00 - 17:30

The influence of commensal bacteria on norovirus infection

A persistent reservoir of a genomic island in Pseudomonas syringae pv. Phaseolicola

17:00 - 17:30

A persistent reservoir of a genomic island in Pseudomonas syringae pv. Phaseolicola

Crystal structures of bacteriophage receptor-binding proteins

17:00 - 17:30

Crystal structures of bacteriophage receptor-binding proteins

Offered oral - Quantifying bacterial DNA double-strand break repair in rael time

17:10 - 17:25

Offered oral - Quantifying bacterial DNA double-strand break repair in rael time

Offered oral - Osmotaxis in Escherichia coli through changes in flagellar motor speed

17:25 - 17:40

Offered oral - Osmotaxis in Escherichia coli through changes in flagellar motor speed

Microbiome Research – opportunity or over-hype?

17:40 - 18:30

Microbiome Research – opportunity or over-hype?

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

Society promotion

19:00 - 19:10

Society promotion

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

20:30 - 22:30

Quiz night (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Tuesday 04 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:30 - 08:45

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:30 - 08:45

Registration

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

09:00 - 09:50

Microbiology Society Prize Medal Lecture: A personal history of structural virology

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Initiatives and introduction to the session

10:00 - 10:30

Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation Initiatives and introduction to the session

How metagenomics-based approaches illuminate diversity and metabolic potential of subsurface microbiomes and their influence on biogeochemical cycling

10:00 - 10:30

How metagenomics-based approaches illuminate diversity and metabolic potential of subsurface microbiomes and their influence on biogeochemical cycling

Investigating plant symbioses in the root using cell type-specific analysis

10:00 - 10:30

Investigating plant symbioses in the root using cell type-specific analysis

Antibiotics, resistance and you

10:00 - 10:30

Antibiotics, resistance and you

Continuous and discontinuous RNA synthesis in coronaviruses

10:00 - 10:30

Continuous and discontinuous RNA synthesis in coronaviruses

Participants' self-introductions to rest of group

10:00 - 10:30

Participants' self-introductions to rest of group

Coacervate micro-droplets as artificial cellular mimics

10:00 - 10:30

Coacervate micro-droplets as artificial cellular mimics

Genome editing in Thalassiosira pseudonana and Fragilariopsis cylindrus: challenges and opportunities for diatom research

10:30 - 11:00

Genome editing in Thalassiosira pseudonana and Fragilariopsis cylindrus: challenges and opportunities for diatom research

Bacterial metabolism of isoprene: a missing link in the biogeochemical cycling of isoprene

10:30 - 11:00

Bacterial metabolism of isoprene: a missing link in the biogeochemical cycling of isoprene

Improving plant health by bacterial volatiles

10:30 - 11:00

Improving plant health by bacterial volatiles

Offered oral - Small colony variants: Size isn't everything

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Small colony variants: Size isn't everything

Chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency

10:30 - 11:00

Chromatin control of gammaherpesvirus latency

Group discussion

10:30 - 10:50

Group discussion

Synthetic biological construction: Beyond 'bio-inspired' in the design of new materials and fabrication systems

10:30 - 11:00

Synthetic biological construction: Beyond 'bio-inspired' in the design of new materials and fabrication systems

Offered oral - Uncovering the lock and key of Escherichia coli – platelet interactions

10:45 - 11:00

Offered oral - Uncovering the lock and key of Escherichia coli – platelet interactions

Components of a manuscript

10:50 - 12:00

Components of a manuscript

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Impacts of microbes on past and present environments

11:00 - 11:30

Impacts of microbes on past and present environments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Propionic acid induces rapid evolution of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Propionic acid induces rapid evolution of Crohn's disease-associated AIEC

Offered oral - Population diversity of genome intermediates following imprecise recombination events in enteroviruses

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Population diversity of genome intermediates following imprecise recombination events in enteroviruses

Rapid streamlining of E. coli by genome-wide editing techniques

11:00 - 11:30

Rapid streamlining of E. coli by genome-wide editing techniques

Flash poster

11:15 - 11:20

Flash poster

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:15 - 11:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Flash poster

11:20 - 11:25

Flash poster

Flash poster

11:25 - 11:30

Flash poster

Functional genomic approaches to understand diatom biology

11:30 - 12:00

Functional genomic approaches to understand diatom biology

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Endophytic colonization from roots to seeds: ecology and how plants can benefit

11:30 - 12:00

Endophytic colonization from roots to seeds: ecology and how plants can benefit

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Dissecting the initial steps of transcription and genome replication in the non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses

11:45 - 12:15

Dissecting the initial steps of transcription and genome replication in the non-segmented negative strand RNA viruses

A symbiotic apicomplexan and the bacteria that make it possible

12:00 - 12:30

A symbiotic apicomplexan and the bacteria that make it possible

The geomicrobiology of the nuclear fuel cycle

12:00 - 12:30

The geomicrobiology of the nuclear fuel cycle

Colonization of crop plants by Salmonella enterica

12:00 - 12:30

Colonization of crop plants by Salmonella enterica

Offered oral - The Streptococcus agalactiae virulence regular CovR affects the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - The Streptococcus agalactiae virulence regular CovR affects the pathogenesis of urinary tract infection

Choosing a journal and article type, and the importance of instructions to authors

12:00 - 12:15

Choosing a journal and article type, and the importance of instructions to authors

Offered oral - Design and construction of a genetic tool with constitutive promoters of varying strength to study function and evolution of proteins from distantly related bacteria in Escherichia coli

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Design and construction of a genetic tool with constitutive promoters of varying strength to study function and evolution of proteins from distantly related bacteria in Escherichia coli

Offered oral - Effect of the endocarditis-associated Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin, LukAB, on polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Effect of the endocarditis-associated Staphylococcus aureus leukotoxin, LukAB, on polymorphonuclear leukocyte migration

Tales of the unexpected: regulation of viral transcription and mis-regulation of host small RNA pathways

12:15 - 12:45

Tales of the unexpected: regulation of viral transcription and mis-regulation of host small RNA pathways

How to respond to reviewers' comments

12:15 - 12:30

How to respond to reviewers' comments

Offered oral - Optimising the production of bulk chemicals from carbon monoxide using a genome-scale model of Clostridium autoethanogenum

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Optimising the production of bulk chemicals from carbon monoxide using a genome-scale model of Clostridium autoethanogenum

Offered oral - Algal polysaccharide utilisation by saprotrophic planktonic marine fungi

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - Algal polysaccharide utilisation by saprotrophic planktonic marine fungi

Novel insights into microbial production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

12:30 - 13:00

Novel insights into microbial production of dimethylsulphoniopropionate (DMSP) and dimethylsulphide (DMS)

Offered oral - Gene expression analyses of the bacterial tree pathogens Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii in vitro and in planta

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - Gene expression analyses of the bacterial tree pathogens Gibbsiella quercinecans and Brenneria goodwinii in vitro and in planta

Offered oral - SLIC by name, slick by nature

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - SLIC by name, slick by nature

Authorship guidelines

12:30 - 12:40

Authorship guidelines

Engineering an artificial bacterial flagellar motor using DNA scaffold nanotechnology

12:30 - 13:00

Engineering an artificial bacterial flagellar motor using DNA scaffold nanotechnology

Journal of Medical Microbiology publishing submission process

12:40 - 12:50

Journal of Medical Microbiology publishing submission process

Offered oral - Developing Corallochytrium limacisporum, an enigmatic unicellular opisthokont, as a new model organism

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Developing Corallochytrium limacisporum, an enigmatic unicellular opisthokont, as a new model organism

Offered oral - Multi-omic profiling of the microbiome–host interactions in Acute Oak Decline

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Multi-omic profiling of the microbiome–host interactions in Acute Oak Decline

Offered oral - Development of a next-generation sequencing metagenomics pipeline for rapid sepsis diagnosis

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Development of a next-generation sequencing metagenomics pipeline for rapid sepsis diagnosis

Offered oral - Rapid mammalian adaptation of an avian H9N2 influenza virus

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Rapid mammalian adaptation of an avian H9N2 influenza virus

Conclude and wrap up

12:50 - 13:00

Conclude and wrap up

Tuesday 04 April, Afternoon

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Live at Lunch: Scientific Publishing Networking

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Scientific Publishing Networking

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Developing a new transfection system for Naegleria

14:00 - 14:30

Developing a new transfection system for Naegleria

Importance of lithoautotrophy in shallow groundwaters

14:00 - 14:30

Importance of lithoautotrophy in shallow groundwaters

The role of the host microenvironment in plant disease development

14:00 - 14:30

The role of the host microenvironment in plant disease development

The genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi

14:00 - 14:30

The genomics of Borrelia burgdorferi

The role of the Merkel cell polyomavirus early gene products in the regulation of viral gene expression and long-term persistence of viral episomes

14:00 - 14:30

The role of the Merkel cell polyomavirus early gene products in the regulation of viral gene expression and long-term persistence of viral episomes

Participants' self-introduction to rest of group

14:00 - 14:20

Participants' self-introduction to rest of group

Metabolic engineering of microalgae as green cell factories

14:00 - 14:30

Metabolic engineering of microalgae as green cell factories

Hepatitis in pregnancy

14:00 - 14:30

Hepatitis in pregnancy

Why should you review?

14:20 - 14:30

Why should you review?

Diplonemids – extremely diverse marine protists with unknown function

14:30 - 15:00

Diplonemids – extremely diverse marine protists with unknown function

Offered oral - Relating the effects of soil hydrophobicity at atomic, biomolecular, core and national scales

14:30 - 14:45

Offered oral - Relating the effects of soil hydrophobicity at atomic, biomolecular, core and national scales

Action and reaction of host and mycotoxin during the development of Fusarium head blight disease

14:30 - 15:00

Action and reaction of host and mycotoxin during the development of Fusarium head blight disease

Offered oral - Increasing the number of replication origins in Escherichia coli is surprisingly problematic for chromosomal replication

14:30 - 14:45

Offered oral - Increasing the number of replication origins in Escherichia coli is surprisingly problematic for chromosomal replication

Influenza virus RNA synthesis and innate immune sensing

14:30 - 15:00

Influenza virus RNA synthesis and innate immune sensing

Review components I – Title, Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods

14:30 - 15:15

Review components I – Title, Abstract, Introduction, Materials and Methods

Enginering of cyanobacteria for production of high-value products: optimization of electron transport and metabolon formation

14:30 - 15:00

Enginering of cyanobacteria for production of high-value products: optimization of electron transport and metabolon formation

Evidence base for treating neonates and progress towards universal screening for congenital CMV infection

14:30 - 15:00

Evidence base for treating neonates and progress towards universal screening for congenital CMV infection

Offered oral - The cryptosphere – viable spores in deep geothermal waters not detectable by standard microbiological techniques

14:45 - 15:00

Offered oral - The cryptosphere – viable spores in deep geothermal waters not detectable by standard microbiological techniques

Offered oral - Contrasting evolutionary fortunes for prophages in an epidemic Salmonella lineage

14:45 - 15:00

Offered oral - Contrasting evolutionary fortunes for prophages in an epidemic Salmonella lineage

Offered oral - Abundance of carbapenem-resistance bacteria in wastewater treatment plant

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Abundance of carbapenem-resistance bacteria in wastewater treatment plant

Diversity and diversification of ammonia oxidisers

15:00 - 15:30

Diversity and diversification of ammonia oxidisers

Offered oral - Characterisation of ΦM1 and ΦRC10, two phages of the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, capable of escaping two Type III toxin-antitoxin/abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Characterisation of ΦM1 and ΦRC10, two phages of the phytopathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, capable of escaping two Type III toxin-antitoxin/abortive infection systems through mutations in a single viral gene

Offered oral - Staged induction of toxin expression and export in Vibrio cholerae

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Staged induction of toxin expression and export in Vibrio cholerae

Offered oral - The role of host cell miRNAs in the KSHV lytic replication cycle

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - The role of host cell miRNAs in the KSHV lytic replication cycle

Offered oral - Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis with a heterologous electron sink

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Tapping the unused potential of photosynthesis with a heterologous electron sink

CVN business

15:00 - 15:30

CVN business

Offered oral - UniEuk: a universal taxonomic framework and integrated reference gene databases to synergize research in eukaryotic biology, ecology, and evolution

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - UniEuk: a universal taxonomic framework and integrated reference gene databases to synergize research in eukaryotic biology, ecology, and evolution

Offered oral - Using network-extracted ontologies to identify novel genes with roles in appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Using network-extracted ontologies to identify novel genes with roles in appressorium development in the rice blast fungus Magnaporthe oryzae

Offered oral - Genomic bases of long-term adaptation to environmental conditions in two major representatives of the marine bacterial phytoplankton, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Genomic bases of long-term adaptation to environmental conditions in two major representatives of the marine bacterial phytoplankton, Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus

Offered oral - Molluscum contagiosum HLA-1 homologue MC080 promotes CD8+ T cell evasion and modulates NK cell recognition by downregulating endogenous classical HLA-I, HLA-E and MICA008

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Molluscum contagiosum HLA-1 homologue MC080 promotes CD8+ T cell evasion and modulates NK cell recognition by downregulating endogenous classical HLA-I, HLA-E and MICA008

Review components II – Results, Discussion, References, Acknowledgement, Figures, Tables

15:15 - 16:30

Review components II – Results, Discussion, References, Acknowledgement, Figures, Tables

Offered oral - Microalgae as cell factories: synthetic transfer RNA genes as genetic engineering tools for the Chlamydomonas reindardtii chloroplast

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Microalgae as cell factories: synthetic transfer RNA genes as genetic engineering tools for the Chlamydomonas reindardtii chloroplast

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Exhibition and refreshments

Genetic manipulation in Dinozoans: a key to unlocking the many mysteries of these bizarre cells

16:00 - 16:30

Genetic manipulation in Dinozoans: a key to unlocking the many mysteries of these bizarre cells

Microbes, minerals and biotechnology

16:00 - 16:30

Microbes, minerals and biotechnology

The ins and outs of the wheat root microbiome

16:00 - 16:30

The ins and outs of the wheat root microbiome

Offered oral - A structurally complex anti-σ factor from Bacillus subtilis plays a key role in sensing acidic growth conditions

16:00 - 16:15

Offered oral - A structurally complex anti-σ factor from Bacillus subtilis plays a key role in sensing acidic growth conditions

The multifunctional herpes simplex virus protein ICP27 plays a pivotal role in regulating viral gene expression

16:00 - 16:30

The multifunctional herpes simplex virus protein ICP27 plays a pivotal role in regulating viral gene expression

Plug and play – developing tuneable gene expression in microalgae using synthetic biology approaches

16:00 - 16:30

Plug and play – developing tuneable gene expression in microalgae using synthetic biology approaches

Commercial representatives presentations

16:00 - 16:30

Commercial representatives presentations

Offered oral - The in vivo RNA interactome of the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - The in vivo RNA interactome of the Gram-positive model organism Bacillus subtilis

Offered oral - Virus resistance affects evolutionary response of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri to environmental change

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Virus resistance affects evolutionary response of the picoeukaryote Ostreococcus tauri to environmental change

Hydrogen as a microbial fuel

16:30 - 17:00

Hydrogen as a microbial fuel

Defining the host control of the rhizosphere bacterial microbiota

16:30 - 17:00

Defining the host control of the rhizosphere bacterial microbiota

Offered oral - Diverse mechanisms of compensatory evolution promote plasmid maintenance in bacterial communities

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Diverse mechanisms of compensatory evolution promote plasmid maintenance in bacterial communities

Regulation of human papillomavirus gene expression at the level of RNA processing

16:30 - 17:00

Regulation of human papillomavirus gene expression at the level of RNA processing

Reporting back to the Editor

16:30 - 16:40

Reporting back to the Editor

Synthesis of anti-bacterial proteins using the Chlamydomonas chloroplast as a production platform

16:30 - 17:00

Synthesis of anti-bacterial proteins using the Chlamydomonas chloroplast as a production platform

Zika virus

16:30 - 17:00

Zika virus

Backend of publication

16:40 - 16:45

Backend of publication

Toward establishment of model organisms for marine protist taxa: successful transfection protocols for the marine protists Bodo caudatus and Monosiga brevicolis

16:45 - 17:15

Toward establishment of model organisms for marine protist taxa: successful transfection protocols for the marine protists Bodo caudatus and Monosiga brevicolis

Offered oral - Evolution of host specificity and virulence of Pseudomonas syringae on Prunus

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Evolution of host specificity and virulence of Pseudomonas syringae on Prunus

Conclude and wrap up

16:45 - 16:55

Conclude and wrap up

One-to-one session with reviewers

16:55 - 17:30

One-to-one session with reviewers

Evolutionary interplay between biology's metallome and the geoenvironment of the planet

17:00 - 17:30

Evolutionary interplay between biology's metallome and the geoenvironment of the planet

Up and down-regulation of quorum-sensing in the niche constructing pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

17:00 - 17:30

Up and down-regulation of quorum-sensing in the niche constructing pathogen Agrobacterium tumefaciens

Offered oral - Regulation of arsenite oxidation by the AioXSR sensory transduction system of Rhizobium sp. str. NT-26

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Regulation of arsenite oxidation by the AioXSR sensory transduction system of Rhizobium sp. str. NT-26

Offered oral - Novel family of peptides with potent antiviral activity against influenza A viruses

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Novel family of peptides with potent antiviral activity against influenza A viruses

Offered oral - Novel synthetic biology approaches for high-value compound production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Novel synthetic biology approaches for high-value compound production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

RSV infections - are we any closer to an immunisation programme?

17:00 - 17:30

RSV infections - are we any closer to an immunisation programme?

Offered oral - Regulation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence by the master regular, AggR

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Regulation of enteroaggregative Escherichia coli virulence by the master regular, AggR

Offered oral - Retroviral Invasion of the Koala Genome part II. What is it doing to the koalas?

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Retroviral Invasion of the Koala Genome part II. What is it doing to the koalas?

Offered oral - High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - High yield secretion of recombinant proteins from the microalga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

17:40 - 18:30

Fleming Prize Lecture: The collateral damage of antimicrobial access in Asia

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

An Audience with... Professor Michael Rossmann

19:00 - 19:30

An Audience with... Professor Michael Rossmann

Wednesday 05 April, Morning

Morning coffee & tea

07:30 - 08:45

Morning coffee & tea

Registration

07:30 - 08:45

Registration

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

09:00 - 09:50

Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture: Transcription activation in bacteria: ancient and modern

Using tintinnid ciliates as a model group to uncover biodiversity patterns in marine microbes

10:00 - 10:30

Using tintinnid ciliates as a model group to uncover biodiversity patterns in marine microbes

Translating the epitranscriptome

10:00 - 10:30

Translating the epitranscriptome

Unravelling autotransporter interactions in biofilms

10:00 - 10:30

Unravelling autotransporter interactions in biofilms

Origins of pandemic cholera from environmental gene pools (and its fate within patients)

10:00 - 10:30

Origins of pandemic cholera from environmental gene pools (and its fate within patients)

Bacterial hydrogen metabolism: a link to the dawn of time, and a role in a sustainable future

10:00 - 10:30

Bacterial hydrogen metabolism: a link to the dawn of time, and a role in a sustainable future

Offered oral - Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus replication through disruption of lipid homeostasis

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Inhibition of Semliki Forest virus replication through disruption of lipid homeostasis

Real world outcomes of DAA therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the HCV Research UK National cohort

10:00 - 10:12

Real world outcomes of DAA therapy for chronic hepatitis C virus infection in the HCV Research UK National cohort

Offered oral - Archaeogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee to human zoonotic transmission of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2)

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Archaeogenetic reconstruction of the chimpanzee to human zoonotic transmission of herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV2)

Offered oral - Mutations within a predicted FFAT-like domain in foot-and-mouth disease virus 3A and the effects on viral replication

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Mutations within a predicted FFAT-like domain in foot-and-mouth disease virus 3A and the effects on viral replication

Offered oral - Human norovirus infection of primary human B cells

10:00 - 10:12

Offered oral - Human norovirus infection of primary human B cells

Offered oral - Determine the molecular and biophysical importance of phospholipids on the avian influenza virus infectivity

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Determine the molecular and biophysical importance of phospholipids on the avian influenza virus infectivity

Serum plasma proteins associated with acute Hanta virus infection in a pregnant woman

10:12 - 10:24

Serum plasma proteins associated with acute Hanta virus infection in a pregnant woman

Offered oral - Finishing two novel Shearwaterpox viruses from Pacific shearwaters unveils deep recombination among Avipoxviruses

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Finishing two novel Shearwaterpox viruses from Pacific shearwaters unveils deep recombination among Avipoxviruses

Offered oral - Investigating the essential role of the nsP3 macro domain in Chikungunya virus replication

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - Investigating the essential role of the nsP3 macro domain in Chikungunya virus replication

Offered oral - HPV E5 oncoprotein interacts with the pro-apoptotic PRAF2 protein

10:12 - 10:24

Offered oral - HPV E5 oncoprotein interacts with the pro-apoptotic PRAF2 protein

Offered oral - Detecting neuraminidase antibodies using influenza NA pseudotyped lentiviruses

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Detecting neuraminidase antibodies using influenza NA pseudotyped lentiviruses

Whole-genome sequencing of adenovireus in immunocompromised paediatric patients directly from clinical samples elucidates molecular epidemiology

10:24 - 10:36

Whole-genome sequencing of adenovireus in immunocompromised paediatric patients directly from clinical samples elucidates molecular epidemiology

Offered oral - Environmental bacteriophages isolated against Dickeya solani

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Environmental bacteriophages isolated against Dickeya solani

Offered oral - Structural and biochemical analysis of protein/RNA interactions during initiation of dengue virus genome replication

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - Structural and biochemical analysis of protein/RNA interactions during initiation of dengue virus genome replication

Offered oral - A Staphylococcus aureus protein enhances influenza A virus replication

10:24 - 10:36

Offered oral - A Staphylococcus aureus protein enhances influenza A virus replication

Gregarine apicomplexan parasites of deep-sea invertebrates

10:30 - 11:00

Gregarine apicomplexan parasites of deep-sea invertebrates

tRNA neochromosome – a party chromosome in the synthetic yeast genome

10:30 - 11:00

tRNA neochromosome – a party chromosome in the synthetic yeast genome

Offered oral - Optimisation of biofilm models to facilitate the monitoring of antimicrobial penetration

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Optimisation of biofilm models to facilitate the monitoring of antimicrobial penetration

Towards a deep understanding of microbial evolution from genomes

10:30 - 11:00

Towards a deep understanding of microbial evolution from genomes

Offered oral - Regulation and function of the Escherichia coli Rtc RNA repair system

10:30 - 10:45

Offered oral - Regulation and function of the Escherichia coli Rtc RNA repair system

Offered oral - Phenotypic changes in cell-passaged H3N2 influenza isolates – implications for serology testing and development of improved assay

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Phenotypic changes in cell-passaged H3N2 influenza isolates – implications for serology testing and development of improved assay

Development of next generation sequencing as routine diagnostics in UCLH: challenges and opportunities on influenza virus

10:36 - 10:48

Development of next generation sequencing as routine diagnostics in UCLH: challenges and opportunities on influenza virus

Offered oral - Counting host switches during the evolution of human-infective RNA viruses

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Counting host switches during the evolution of human-infective RNA viruses

Offered oral - Altering the CG content of the HIV-1 gag sequence attenuates viral replication

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Altering the CG content of the HIV-1 gag sequence attenuates viral replication

Offered oral - Investigating changes to the host cell proteome during BK polyomavirus infection

10:36 - 10:48

Offered oral - Investigating changes to the host cell proteome during BK polyomavirus infection

Tuning interaction forces for positioning within biofilms

10:45 - 11:15

Tuning interaction forces for positioning within biofilms

Offered oral - Modelling the metabolism of the tsetse microbiome

10:45 - 11:00

Offered oral - Modelling the metabolism of the tsetse microbiome

Offered oral - Towards small-molecule entry inhibitors of BK polyomavirus infection

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Towards small-molecule entry inhibitors of BK polyomavirus infection

Hepatitis E virus: Whole genome sequencing as a new tool for understanding HEV epidemiology and phenotypes in Europe

10:48 - 11:00

Hepatitis E virus: Whole genome sequencing as a new tool for understanding HEV epidemiology and phenotypes in Europe

Offered oral - Comparative analysis of mammalian viruses found in human and animal enteric samples from Vietnam

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Comparative analysis of mammalian viruses found in human and animal enteric samples from Vietnam

Offered oral - The role of structured RNA in Chikungunya virus genome replication

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - The role of structured RNA in Chikungunya virus genome replication

Offered oral - Delay of hepatic differentiation induced by hepatitis C virus infection

10:48 - 11:00

Offered oral - Delay of hepatic differentiation induced by hepatitis C virus infection

Assuming Arrhenius?

11:00 - 11:30

Assuming Arrhenius?

Flash talks

11:00 - 11:15

Flash talks

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

DisCVR: Rapid viral diagnosis from NGS data

11:00 - 11:30

DisCVR: Rapid viral diagnosis from NGS data

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:00 - 11:30

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Flash talks

11:15 - 11:30

Flash talks

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:15 - 11:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:30 - 12:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

LUCA and the Universal tree of life: breaking the phylogenetic impasses

11:30 - 12:00

LUCA and the Universal tree of life: breaking the phylogenetic impasses

Offered oral - Investigating the link between the gut microbiota and the brain through mass spectometry imaging

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Investigating the link between the gut microbiota and the brain through mass spectometry imaging

Offered oral - Targeting host cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) as potential anti-viral therapeutics against polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Targeting host cell ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) as potential anti-viral therapeutics against polyomavirus-associated nephropathy

Screening for chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection using a commercial antigen assay and a novel neutralisation test confirming specifity

11:30 - 11:42

Screening for chronic hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection using a commercial antigen assay and a novel neutralisation test confirming specifity

Offered oral - PCR sequencing of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus genome reflects quasi-species variation defined by next-generation sequencing

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - PCR sequencing of the bovine viral diarrhoea virus genome reflects quasi-species variation defined by next-generation sequencing

Offered oral - Illuminating the non-structural protein organisation of hepatitis C virus replication complexes: a super-resolution microscopy approach

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Illuminating the non-structural protein organisation of hepatitis C virus replication complexes: a super-resolution microscopy approach

Offered oral - Murine Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type central and peripheral nervous system co-cultures reveal early cell targets of Brazilian isolate ZIKV infection

11:30 - 11:42

Offered oral - Murine Ifnar1 knockout and wild-type central and peripheral nervous system co-cultures reveal early cell targets of Brazilian isolate ZIKV infection

Offered oral - A comprehensive comparison of different strategies to create attenuated genomes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV): Live-cell imaging analyses using fluorescent FMDV replicons

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - A comprehensive comparison of different strategies to create attenuated genomes of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV): Live-cell imaging analyses using fluorescent FMDV replicons

An investigation of Epstein-Barr virus gene regulation and host immune response in prospectively collected blood specimens from paediatric liver and multi-visceral transplant recipients

11:42 - 11:54

An investigation of Epstein-Barr virus gene regulation and host immune response in prospectively collected blood specimens from paediatric liver and multi-visceral transplant recipients

Offered oral - Using next-generation sequencing to investigate HIV-1 transmission

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - Using next-generation sequencing to investigate HIV-1 transmission

Offered oral - Investigating the mechanisms by which ANP32 proteins support infuenza A polymerase function

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - Investigating the mechanisms by which ANP32 proteins support infuenza A polymerase function

Offered oral - KLK6-mediated degradation of Keratin10 is commonly employed by skin-tropic viruses to propagate in skin and is required for blister formation in VZV infection

11:42 - 11:54

Offered oral - KLK6-mediated degradation of Keratin10 is commonly employed by skin-tropic viruses to propagate in skin and is required for blister formation in VZV infection

The effect of surface topography on microbial adhesion

11:45 - 12:15

The effect of surface topography on microbial adhesion

Offered oral - Dissecting the structural and catalytic role of a symmetric ferroxidase centre in encapsulated ferritins

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Dissecting the structural and catalytic role of a symmetric ferroxidase centre in encapsulated ferritins

Offered oral - Mycobacterium ulcerans mouse model refinement for pre-clinical profiling of vaccine candidates

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Mycobacterium ulcerans mouse model refinement for pre-clinical profiling of vaccine candidates

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

11:54 - 12:24

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Characterisation of novel Alphacoronaviruses in European rodents and shrews

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Characterisation of novel Alphacoronaviruses in European rodents and shrews

Offered oral - Modulation of chloride channels inhibit Chikungunya virus genome replication

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Modulation of chloride channels inhibit Chikungunya virus genome replication

Offered oral - Transcriptome analysis of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma and similarities with human lung adenocarcinoma

11:54 - 12:06

Offered oral - Transcriptome analysis of ovine pulmonary adenocarcinoma and similarities with human lung adenocarcinoma

Offered oral - Nutrient recycling facilitates long-term stability of microbial phototroph–heterotroph interactions in marine systems

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Nutrient recycling facilitates long-term stability of microbial phototroph–heterotroph interactions in marine systems

Challenges and opportunities of ribosomal DNA-micro-heterogeneity detection and analysis in yeast NGS datasets

12:00 - 12:30

Challenges and opportunities of ribosomal DNA-micro-heterogeneity detection and analysis in yeast NGS datasets

Offered oral - Comparative analyses of selection operating on non-translated intergenic regions of diverse bacterial species using whole genome sequence data

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - Comparative analyses of selection operating on non-translated intergenic regions of diverse bacterial species using whole genome sequence data

Offered oral - In vitro induction of Salmonella typhimurium into viable but non-culturable state, its characterisation and relevance to infection

12:00 - 12:15

Offered oral - In vitro induction of Salmonella typhimurium into viable but non-culturable state, its characterisation and relevance to infection

Offered oral - Developing anti-cancer vaccine vectors

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Developing anti-cancer vaccine vectors

Offered oral - Deformed wing virus diversity: identification of sequences associated with disease in a globally-distributed viral pathogen of honey bees

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Deformed wing virus diversity: identification of sequences associated with disease in a globally-distributed viral pathogen of honey bees

Offered oral - Dependency of HIV-1 replication on the glycolytic metabolism of primary CD4+ T cells

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - Dependency of HIV-1 replication on the glycolytic metabolism of primary CD4+ T cells

Offered oral - CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to human cytomegalovirus proteins expressed by latently infected cells

12:06 - 12:18

Offered oral - CD4 and CD8 T cell responses to human cytomegalovirus proteins expressed by latently infected cells

Offered oral -Prokaryotic niche partitioning in suspended versus sinking marine particles

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral -Prokaryotic niche partitioning in suspended versus sinking marine particles

Offered oral - Laboratory X-ray microtomography as a tool for 3D visualization of biofilm in porous media made up of zeolite

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Laboratory X-ray microtomography as a tool for 3D visualization of biofilm in porous media made up of zeolite

Offered oral - How does bacterial genetic background potentiate the evolution of antibiotic resistance?

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - How does bacterial genetic background potentiate the evolution of antibiotic resistance?

Offered oral - Novel regulators of gas vesicle, flagellum and antibiotic production in Serratia

12:15 - 12:30

Offered oral - Novel regulators of gas vesicle, flagellum and antibiotic production in Serratia

Offered oral - Activation of in vitro immune responses using a novel lentiviral vector

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Activation of in vitro immune responses using a novel lentiviral vector

Offered oral - Detecting human cytomegalovirus recombination signatures in clinical samples

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Detecting human cytomegalovirus recombination signatures in clinical samples

Offered oral - CTCF regulates differentiation-dependent HPV gene expression

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - CTCF regulates differentiation-dependent HPV gene expression

Offered oral - Swine influenza infectiousness and transmission: identifying new biomarkers

12:18 - 12:30

Offered oral - Swine influenza infectiousness and transmission: identifying new biomarkers

Metagenomic viral sequencing for non-targeted pathogen identification

12:24 - 12:36

Metagenomic viral sequencing for non-targeted pathogen identification

Is plankton a plankton a plankton: overcoming challenges of species-specificity in plankton behavior and physiology to derive general patterns

12:30 - 13:00

Is plankton a plankton a plankton: overcoming challenges of species-specificity in plankton behavior and physiology to derive general patterns

Evolution and function of intron sequences in yeast

12:30 - 13:00

Evolution and function of intron sequences in yeast

Distribution and structure of biofilms in clinical specimens – a paradox emerging

12:30 - 13:00

Distribution and structure of biofilms in clinical specimens – a paradox emerging

Disentangling the fragmented evolutionary history of prokaryotes

12:30 - 13:00

Disentangling the fragmented evolutionary history of prokaryotes

Offered oral - The glyoxylate shunt as a target for antibacterial intervention in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

12:30 - 12:45

Offered oral - The glyoxylate shunt as a target for antibacterial intervention in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

Offered oral - Modular cell-based platform for high throughput identification of compounds that target a viral interferon antagonist of choice: Identification of novel compounds that inhibit respiratory syncytial virus NS2 and human cytomegalovirus IE1

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Modular cell-based platform for high throughput identification of compounds that target a viral interferon antagonist of choice: Identification of novel compounds that inhibit respiratory syncytial virus NS2 and human cytomegalovirus IE1

Offered oral - Ebola glycoprotein mutations: from branched amino acid to branched phylogeny tree

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Ebola glycoprotein mutations: from branched amino acid to branched phylogeny tree

Offered oral - EBNA-LP enables Epstein-Barr virus gene expression by facilitating transcription factor recruitment to viral genomes early after infection

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - EBNA-LP enables Epstein-Barr virus gene expression by facilitating transcription factor recruitment to viral genomes early after infection

Offered oral - Merkel cell polyomavirus small tumour antigen expression is sufficient to drive an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

12:30 - 12:42

Offered oral - Merkel cell polyomavirus small tumour antigen expression is sufficient to drive an epithelial to mesenchymal transition

Deep sequencing for diagnosis of encephalitis

12:36 - 12:48

Deep sequencing for diagnosis of encephalitis

Offered oral - Preclinical characterization of PC786, a novel inhaled respiratory syncytial virus specific non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Preclinical characterization of PC786, a novel inhaled respiratory syncytial virus specific non-nucleoside polymerase inhibitor

Offered oral - IBV selection versus mutation: development of a whole genome sequencing protocol for IBV

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - IBV selection versus mutation: development of a whole genome sequencing protocol for IBV

Offered oral - Characterisation of the human cytomegalovirus US12 family gene products

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Characterisation of the human cytomegalovirus US12 family gene products

Offered oral - Do pathogenic simian immunodeficiency viruses bypass live attenuated vaccine protection through extension of the breadth of cells they infect?

12:42 - 12:54

Offered oral - Do pathogenic simian immunodeficiency viruses bypass live attenuated vaccine protection through extension of the breadth of cells they infect?

Offered oral - Transcriptional control of primary carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas

12:45 - 13:00

Offered oral - Transcriptional control of primary carbon metabolism in Pseudomonas

Varied Ebola virus (EBOV) neutralising antibody responses in convalescent plasma

12:48 - 13:00

Varied Ebola virus (EBOV) neutralising antibody responses in convalescent plasma

Wednesday 05 April, Afternoon

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

13:00 - 14:00

Lunch and exhibition

Live at Lunch: Clinical cases in medical microbiology – an interactive session

13:15 - 14:00

Live at Lunch: Clinical cases in medical microbiology – an interactive session

Flash poster presentations

13:30 - 14:00

Flash poster presentations

Environmental impact assessment of salmon aquaculture using DNA barcoding of ciliates

14:00 - 14:30

Environmental impact assessment of salmon aquaculture using DNA barcoding of ciliates

Cross-kingdom RNAi in plant–pathogen interactions

14:00 - 14:30

Cross-kingdom RNAi in plant–pathogen interactions

Experimental evolution in biofilms to understand adaptation during infections

14:00 - 14:30

Experimental evolution in biofilms to understand adaptation during infections

Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade through and modify Gram-negative bacterial cell surfaces

14:00 - 14:30

Predatory Bdellovibrio bacteriovorus invade through and modify Gram-negative bacterial cell surfaces

Using genomics to understand the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus

14:00 - 14:30

Using genomics to understand the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus aureus

Offered oral - Investigation into the role of the S1 and S2 subunit of the coronavirus IVB S gene in inducing a protective immune response

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Investigation into the role of the S1 and S2 subunit of the coronavirus IVB S gene in inducing a protective immune response

Offered oral

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral

Commercial representatives presentations

14:00 - 14:30

Commercial representatives presentations

Offered oral - FMDV replication is dependent on alternative mutually-exclusive polyprotein processing pathways

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - FMDV replication is dependent on alternative mutually-exclusive polyprotein processing pathways

Offered oral - Control of the innate immune response by the Sapovirus protease NS6

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Control of the innate immune response by the Sapovirus protease NS6

Offered oral - Dissection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry into hepatocytes, and identification of species-specific limitations

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - Dissection of hepatitis B virus (HBV) entry into hepatocytes, and identification of species-specific limitations

Offered oral - A role for serine phosphorylation in regulating the cellular interactions of NSSA

14:00 - 14:12

Offered oral - A role for serine phosphorylation in regulating the cellular interactions of NSSA

Offered oral - Analysis of the tropism of recombinant infectious bronchitis viruses and their ability to confer protection against homologous challenge

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Analysis of the tropism of recombinant infectious bronchitis viruses and their ability to confer protection against homologous challenge

Offered oral

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral

Offered oral - The viral 2A peptide has an extended conformation in the ribosomal exit tunnel

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - The viral 2A peptide has an extended conformation in the ribosomal exit tunnel

Offered oral - Evasion of host innate immunity by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) - V protein and its pathogenic consequences

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Evasion of host innate immunity by Newcastle disease virus (NDV) - V protein and its pathogenic consequences

Offered oral - Crystal structure of a distinct viral capsid/ssDNA complex illuminates how viruses assemble into infectious virions

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Crystal structure of a distinct viral capsid/ssDNA complex illuminates how viruses assemble into infectious virions

Offered oral - Characterisation of deformed wing virus growth in vitro and in vivo

14:12 - 14:24

Offered oral - Characterisation of deformed wing virus growth in vitro and in vivo

Offered oral - The antigenic relationships of outer coat protein VP2, between distinct bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - The antigenic relationships of outer coat protein VP2, between distinct bluetongue virus (BTV) serotypes

Offered oral

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral

Offered oral - Anti-splicing drugs inhibit HPV16 E2 protein expression during the human papillomavirus replication cycle

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Anti-splicing drugs inhibit HPV16 E2 protein expression during the human papillomavirus replication cycle

Offered oral - Differential phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression in chicken and duck cells may explain the differences in antiviral response between these species

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Differential phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) expression in chicken and duck cells may explain the differences in antiviral response between these species

Offered oral - Structural and functional characterisation of calicivirus binding and entry

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - Structural and functional characterisation of calicivirus binding and entry

Offered oral - The role of SPZ1 in high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-caused oncogenesis

14:24 - 14:36

Offered oral - The role of SPZ1 in high risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV)-caused oncogenesis

Biosensing the annual bloom in the North Pacific

14:30 - 15:00

Biosensing the annual bloom in the North Pacific

Abundant non-coding RNA involved in early Dictyostelium discoideum development is conserved in Dictyostelid social amoebae

14:30 - 15:00

Abundant non-coding RNA involved in early Dictyostelium discoideum development is conserved in Dictyostelid social amoebae

The Candida albicans biofilm life-style: adaptation to hypoxia and adhesion

14:30 - 15:00

The Candida albicans biofilm life-style: adaptation to hypoxia and adhesion

Structural and molecular biology of type IV secretion systems

14:30 - 15:00

Structural and molecular biology of type IV secretion systems

Genomic changes and ecological contexts associated with emerging bacterial infections

14:30 - 15:00

Genomic changes and ecological contexts associated with emerging bacterial infections

Neglected tropical viruses

14:30 - 15:00

Neglected tropical viruses

Offered oral - Replication-deficient strains: insights into the next generation of bluetongue virus vaccines

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Replication-deficient strains: insights into the next generation of bluetongue virus vaccines

Offered oral

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral

Offered oral - Cis-acting RNA sequences regulate HIV-1 envelope and Vpu translation

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Cis-acting RNA sequences regulate HIV-1 envelope and Vpu translation

Offered oral - Adaptation of an avian-origin influenza A virus to a mammal involves key changes in NS1 function

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Adaptation of an avian-origin influenza A virus to a mammal involves key changes in NS1 function

Offered oral - The primary enveloped virion of herpes simplex virus 1 characterised by cryo-electron microscopy

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - The primary enveloped virion of herpes simplex virus 1 characterised by cryo-electron microscopy

Offered oral - Ribonucleoprotein structure in pathogenic Orthobunyaviruses

14:36 - 14:48

Offered oral - Ribonucleoprotein structure in pathogenic Orthobunyaviruses

Offered oral - Assembly of defective African horse sickness virus particles: rational design of vaccines for all serotypes

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Assembly of defective African horse sickness virus particles: rational design of vaccines for all serotypes

Offered oral

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral

Offered oral - Insights into the mechanism of apoptosis inhibition by the viral BCL-2 homologue, BHRF1

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Insights into the mechanism of apoptosis inhibition by the viral BCL-2 homologue, BHRF1

Offered oral - TLR4 is implicated in respiratory syncytial virus infection and concomitant innate immune responses

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - TLR4 is implicated in respiratory syncytial virus infection and concomitant innate immune responses

Offered oral - Bioorthogonal chemical analysis of herpesvirus early genome transport and nuclear presentation

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - Bioorthogonal chemical analysis of herpesvirus early genome transport and nuclear presentation

Offered oral - The extended open reading frame of the influenza NP protein in the 2009 pandemic strain contributes to pathogenicity

14:48 - 15:00

Offered oral - The extended open reading frame of the influenza NP protein in the 2009 pandemic strain contributes to pathogenicity

Exploring the melting microbial frontiers of our frozen planet

15:00 - 15:30

Exploring the melting microbial frontiers of our frozen planet

Presence of ncRNAs in yeast introns and their impact on maintenance of phenotype

15:00 - 15:30

Presence of ncRNAs in yeast introns and their impact on maintenance of phenotype

Parallel evolution in bacterial biofilm development

15:00 - 15:30

Parallel evolution in bacterial biofilm development

Offered oral - Intermembrane cross-talk in E. coli

15:00 - 15:15

Offered oral - Intermembrane cross-talk in E. coli

Sequential waves of sexually transmitted shigellosis in men who have sex with men drive by common determinants of antimicrobial resistance

15:00 - 15:30

Sequential waves of sexually transmitted shigellosis in men who have sex with men drive by common determinants of antimicrobial resistance

Offered oral - Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replication

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Development of small molecule inhibitors of Ebola virus genome replication

Offered oral

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral

Blood borne virus infection in organ donors

15:00 - 15:30

Blood borne virus infection in organ donors

Offered oral - Genetic analysis of the relationship between EBNA3C-RBPJ interaction and gene regulation during Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Genetic analysis of the relationship between EBNA3C-RBPJ interaction and gene regulation during Epstein-Barr virus transformation of B cells

Offered oral - The envelope gene of transmitted HIV-1 resists a late IFNy-induced block

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - The envelope gene of transmitted HIV-1 resists a late IFNy-induced block

Offered oral - Agnoprotein is an essential egress factor during the BK polyomavirus life cycle

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Agnoprotein is an essential egress factor during the BK polyomavirus life cycle

Offered oral - Are New World monkeys more susceptible to Zika virus?

15:00 - 15:12

Offered oral - Are New World monkeys more susceptible to Zika virus?

Offered oral - Turning up the heat on flaviviruses: Hsp70 inhibitors with potent antiviral activity against diverse flaviviruses in primary human dendritic cells

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Turning up the heat on flaviviruses: Hsp70 inhibitors with potent antiviral activity against diverse flaviviruses in primary human dendritic cells

Offered oral

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral

Offered oral - Inter-segment RNA–RNA interactions mediate genome segment packaging in the rotaviruses and other members of the Reoviridae

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Inter-segment RNA–RNA interactions mediate genome segment packaging in the rotaviruses and other members of the Reoviridae

Offered oral - Characterisation of the innate immune response to adeno-associated virus in the presence of neutralising antibodies

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Characterisation of the innate immune response to adeno-associated virus in the presence of neutralising antibodies

Offered oral - Investigating cellular proteins involved in HSV-1 egress

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - Investigating cellular proteins involved in HSV-1 egress

Offered oral - JNK signalling is required during the human papillomavirus life cycle

15:12 - 15:24

Offered oral - JNK signalling is required during the human papillomavirus life cycle

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:15 - 15:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Broad spectrum antiviral activity of arbidol extends to hemorrhagic fever viruses and Zika virus

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Broad spectrum antiviral activity of arbidol extends to hemorrhagic fever viruses and Zika virus

Offered oral

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral

Offered oral - Rational attentuation of murine norovirus by mutations in the multifunctional capsid shell domain

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Rational attentuation of murine norovirus by mutations in the multifunctional capsid shell domain

Offered oral - A multi-species comparison of vertebrate interferomes

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - A multi-species comparison of vertebrate interferomes

Offered oral - Close your eyes and count to 10: Insights into genome segment assortment in reovirus

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - Close your eyes and count to 10: Insights into genome segment assortment in reovirus

Offered oral - A new type of viral RNA links 1918 influenza virus virulence to RNA polymerase activity

15:24 - 15:36

Offered oral - A new type of viral RNA links 1918 influenza virus virulence to RNA polymerase activity

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:30 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Gastroenteritis virus surveillance and management

15:30 - 16:00

Gastroenteritis virus surveillance and management

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

15:36 - 16:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Lipoteichoic acid synthesis and function in Gram-positive bacteria

15:45 - 16:15

Lipoteichoic acid synthesis and function in Gram-positive bacteria

The pathobiome concept: an emerging view of the microbial dynamics of disease

16:00 - 16:30

The pathobiome concept: an emerging view of the microbial dynamics of disease

RNAi-directed epigenetic gene silencing

16:00 - 16:30

RNAi-directed epigenetic gene silencing

Modelling multiple strain C. difficile infection

16:00 - 16:30

Modelling multiple strain C. difficile infection

Within host evolution of cystic fibrosis pathogens

16:00 - 16:30

Within host evolution of cystic fibrosis pathogens

Offered oral - A novel moo-noclonal antibody platform: from antibody to vaccine design, and back again

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - A novel moo-noclonal antibody platform: from antibody to vaccine design, and back again

Offered oral

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral

Exhibition and refreshments

16:00 - 17:30

Exhibition and refreshments

Offered oral - Transcriptomic signatures differentiate survival from fatal outcomes in humans infected with Ebola virus

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Transcriptomic signatures differentiate survival from fatal outcomes in humans infected with Ebola virus

Offered oral - ISG expression screening reveals the genus-specific antibunyaviral activity of ISG20

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - ISG expression screening reveals the genus-specific antibunyaviral activity of ISG20

Offered oral - Bluetongue virus serotype 26 (BTV-26): an arbovirus that is not able to infect or replicate in a Culiocoides vector species

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Bluetongue virus serotype 26 (BTV-26): an arbovirus that is not able to infect or replicate in a Culiocoides vector species

Offered oral - Oncolytic herpes virus (oHSV) cell killing in a three dimensional epithelial tumour cell culture system

16:00 - 16:12

Offered oral - Oncolytic herpes virus (oHSV) cell killing in a three dimensional epithelial tumour cell culture system

Offered oral - Human parainfluenza 3: an effective in vitro model for therapeutic candidates

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Human parainfluenza 3: an effective in vitro model for therapeutic candidates

Offered oral

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral

Offered oral - Functional analysis of the cell-cycle regulator RGC-32 in EBV-infected cells

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Functional analysis of the cell-cycle regulator RGC-32 in EBV-infected cells

Offered oral - Structural elucidation of the rabies virus P-protein axis: The molecular basis for evasion of innate immunity

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Structural elucidation of the rabies virus P-protein axis: The molecular basis for evasion of innate immunity

Offered oral - Rewriting nature's ssRNA viral assembly manual

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Rewriting nature's ssRNA viral assembly manual

Offered oral - Hepatitis C (HCV) E1E2 envelope glycoprotein can interfere with HIV-1 infection

16:12 - 16:24

Offered oral - Hepatitis C (HCV) E1E2 envelope glycoprotein can interfere with HIV-1 infection

Offered oral - Clostridium difficile S-layer biogenesis and the role of the accessory sec secretion pathway

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Clostridium difficile S-layer biogenesis and the role of the accessory sec secretion pathway

Offered oral - Parallel HCV culture systems reveal differences in the development of NS5A inhibitor resistance by genotype 3

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Parallel HCV culture systems reveal differences in the development of NS5A inhibitor resistance by genotype 3

Offered oral

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral

Offered oral - Novel insights into diseases of T and NK cells caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Novel insights into diseases of T and NK cells caused by Epstein-Barr virus infection

Offered oral - Duck vs chicken: IFITM proteins as determinants of host susceptibility to avian influenza virus

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Duck vs chicken: IFITM proteins as determinants of host susceptibility to avian influenza virus

Offered oral - Packaging signal mediated assembly of enteroviruses

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - Packaging signal mediated assembly of enteroviruses

Offered oral - The impact of macrophage phenotype on the response to influenza A virus infection

16:24 - 16:36

Offered oral - The impact of macrophage phenotype on the response to influenza A virus infection

Offered oral - The role of cell and particle characteristics in the adhesion of E. coli to suspended intertidal sediments

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - The role of cell and particle characteristics in the adhesion of E. coli to suspended intertidal sediments

Small RNAs and heterochromatic regulation in fission yeast

16:30 - 17:00

Small RNAs and heterochromatic regulation in fission yeast

Offered oral - Killing by type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation, favouring the evolution of cooperation

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Killing by type VI secretion drives genetic phase separation, favouring the evolution of cooperation

Offered oral - Solving a 25-year-old mystery: Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - Solving a 25-year-old mystery: Treadmilling by FtsZ filaments drives peptidoglycan synthesis and bacterial cell division

Offered oral - An evolutionary genomic history of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland

16:30 - 16:45

Offered oral - An evolutionary genomic history of Legionnaires' disease in Scotland

Offered oral - The massive decline of clinically relevant high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in Scotland

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - The massive decline of clinically relevant high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in Scotland

Offered oral

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral

Offered oral - The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein employs STAT2/3- and nucleosome-dependent mechanisms to mediate viral reactivation from latency

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - The human cytomegalovirus IE1 protein employs STAT2/3- and nucleosome-dependent mechanisms to mediate viral reactivation from latency

Offered oral - Resistance of transmitted founder HIV-1 to IFITM-mediated restriction

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - Resistance of transmitted founder HIV-1 to IFITM-mediated restriction

Offered oral - In situ intranuclear herpesvirus capsid structure from frozen cells by cryo-eletron tomography

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - In situ intranuclear herpesvirus capsid structure from frozen cells by cryo-eletron tomography

Offered oral - Dysregulation of microRNA expression in sheep lung following jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus infection

16:36 - 16:48

Offered oral - Dysregulation of microRNA expression in sheep lung following jaagsiekte sheep retrovirus infection

Offered oral - Desert dust source of iron to the globally important diazotroph Trichodesmium. A physiological and transcriptomic study

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Desert dust source of iron to the globally important diazotroph Trichodesmium. A physiological and transcriptomic study

Offered oral - Complex metabolic traits regulate biofilm heterogeneity in Candida albicans

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - Complex metabolic traits regulate biofilm heterogeneity in Candida albicans

Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

16:45 - 17:15

Iron acquisition by Mycobacterium tuberculosis

Offered oral - The Legionella genus genome: A global view of the genus evolution

16:45 - 17:00

Offered oral - The Legionella genus genome: A global view of the genus evolution

Offered oral

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral

Offered oral - BCL3 acts as a host cell restriction factor for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - BCL3 acts as a host cell restriction factor for Epstein-Barr virus reactivation

Offered oral - Inhibition of parainfluenza virus 5 ribonucleoprotein function by protein ISGylation

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - Inhibition of parainfluenza virus 5 ribonucleoprotein function by protein ISGylation

Offered oral - The structural features of a Geminivirus particle revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - The structural features of a Geminivirus particle revealed by cryo-electron microscopy

Offered oral - SNAP-tagged Chikungunya virus replicons improve visualisation of non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) by fluorescence microscopy

16:48 - 17:00

Offered oral - SNAP-tagged Chikungunya virus replicons improve visualisation of non-structural protein 3 (nsP3) by fluorescence microscopy

Tracking tiny eukaryotic algae in the wild

17:00 - 17:30

Tracking tiny eukaryotic algae in the wild

Offered oral - Secretion of small RNAs and an argonaute by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus: at the host interface

17:00 - 17:15

Offered oral - Secretion of small RNAs and an argonaute by the gastrointestinal nematode Heligmosomoides polygyrus: at the host interface

The ecology of the microbiome: Networks, competitionl, and stability

17:00 - 17:30

The ecology of the microbiome: Networks, competitionl, and stability

Structure, evolution and transmission of Enterococcus faecium populations

17:00 - 17:30

Structure, evolution and transmission of Enterococcus faecium populations

Offered oral

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral

Offered oral - Spatial regulation of PML-NB mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Spatial regulation of PML-NB mediated intrinsic antiviral immunity to herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) infection

Offered oral - Membrane permeability induced by foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP4

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Membrane permeability induced by foot-and-mouth disease virus capsid protein VP4

Offered oral - Characterisation of the role of the deubiquitylase USP45 in Chikungunya virus infection

17:00 - 17:12

Offered oral - Characterisation of the role of the deubiquitylase USP45 in Chikungunya virus infection

Offered oral

17:12 - 17:24

Offered oral

Offered oral - Effects of EGFR mutations during influenza A virus infection of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

17:12 - 17:24

Offered oral - Effects of EGFR mutations during influenza A virus infection of non-small cell lung carcinoma cell lines

Offered oral - Identification of small regulatory RNAs in Burkholderia cenocepacia

17:15 - 17:30

Offered oral - Identification of small regulatory RNAs in Burkholderia cenocepacia

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

17:40 - 18:30

Colworth Prize Lecture: The 2A protein co-expression system: a lesson learnt from viruses to make therapeutic proteins, transgenic plants and animals, cures for cancer and pluripotent stem cells

Drinks reception and poster presentations

18:30 - 20:00

Drinks reception and poster presentations

Society promotion

19:00 - 19:10

Society promotion

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)

20:30 - 23:30

Ceilidh (pre-paid ticket holders only)

Thursday 06 April, Morning

Registration

08:15 - 09:15

Registration

Morning coffee & tea

08:15 - 09:15

Morning coffee & tea

Manipulation of host membrane systems for productive poxvirus infection

09:00 - 09:30

Manipulation of host membrane systems for productive poxvirus infection

Bacterial motility: swimming and gliding

09:15 - 09:45

Bacterial motility: swimming and gliding

Clostridium perfringens-mediated myonecrosis: it is not all about toxins

09:30 - 10:00

Clostridium perfringens-mediated myonecrosis: it is not all about toxins

HIV-1 activates T cell signalling independently of antigen to drive viral spread

09:30 - 10:00

HIV-1 activates T cell signalling independently of antigen to drive viral spread

New and improved tools in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

09:30 - 10:00

New and improved tools in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infection

Bacteria reactivate motility by repurposing a nitrogen regulatory system

09:30 - 10:00

Bacteria reactivate motility by repurposing a nitrogen regulatory system

Nuclear RNA decay pathways aid rapid remodelling of gene expression in yeast

09:30 - 10:00

Nuclear RNA decay pathways aid rapid remodelling of gene expression in yeast

The contribution of extracellular DNA to the architecture of oral biofilms

09:30 - 10:00

The contribution of extracellular DNA to the architecture of oral biofilms

Studying bacterial gene expression during infection with RNA-seq

09:30 - 10:00

Studying bacterial gene expression during infection with RNA-seq

Targeting herpesvirus ribonucleoprotein particle assembly: a novel antiviral strategy

09:30 - 10:00

Targeting herpesvirus ribonucleoprotein particle assembly: a novel antiviral strategy

Offered oral - Mycobacterial cell surface hydrophobicity – a factor promoting bacterial aerosolisation and transmission of disease?

09:45 - 10:00

Offered oral - Mycobacterial cell surface hydrophobicity – a factor promoting bacterial aerosolisation and transmission of disease?

Dichelobacter nodosus in the interdigital skin: the primary instigator of inflammation in footrot or setting the scene for opportunists?

10:00 - 10:30

Dichelobacter nodosus in the interdigital skin: the primary instigator of inflammation in footrot or setting the scene for opportunists?

Offered oral - Fluorescent tracking of Bunyamwera virus in live cells reveals the requirement for cellular potassium channels during the early stages of the bunyavirus lifecycle

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Fluorescent tracking of Bunyamwera virus in live cells reveals the requirement for cellular potassium channels during the early stages of the bunyavirus lifecycle

Offered oral - Low titre Pneumocystis jirovecii infections: More than just colonization?

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Low titre Pneumocystis jirovecii infections: More than just colonization?

Offered oral - Gene expression of sulfide-oxidising Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO during nitrate-mediated biocorrosion

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Gene expression of sulfide-oxidising Sulfurimonas sp. strain CVO during nitrate-mediated biocorrosion

Non-coding transcription, gene expression and replication in yeast

10:00 - 10:30

Non-coding transcription, gene expression and replication in yeast

Offered oral - Pseudomonas aeruginosa can kill Candida albicans hyphae by mechanisms that require a functional type 3 secretion system

10:00 - 10:15

Offered oral - Pseudomonas aeruginosa can kill Candida albicans hyphae by mechanisms that require a functional type 3 secretion system

Building a morphologically complex bacterial biofilm – spatial organization of transcriptional control and c-di-GMP signalling in E. coli macrocolony biofilms

10:00 - 10:30

Building a morphologically complex bacterial biofilm – spatial organization of transcriptional control and c-di-GMP signalling in E. coli macrocolony biofilms

Watching antibiotic resistance evolve: the MEGA-plate

10:00 - 10:30

Watching antibiotic resistance evolve: the MEGA-plate

Molecular biology of flaviviruses

10:00 - 10:30

Molecular biology of flaviviruses

Molecular mechanism of viral gene silencing by Morc2 and the human silencing hub

10:15 - 10:45

Molecular mechanism of viral gene silencing by Morc2 and the human silencing hub

Offered oral - Candida albicans is a moving target for the immune system as it adapts to host signals

10:15 - 10:30

Offered oral - Candida albicans is a moving target for the immune system as it adapts to host signals

Offered oral - T4-like environmental phage ΦCBH8 "activates" ToxINPa-mediated "altruistic suicide" in Serratia

10:15 - 10:30

Offered oral - T4-like environmental phage ΦCBH8 "activates" ToxINPa-mediated "altruistic suicide" in Serratia

Taking inspiration from the structure of bacterial biofilms

10:15 - 10:45

Taking inspiration from the structure of bacterial biofilms

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 10:45

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:30 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

High frequency recombination in Bacteroides fragilis: diversity, virulence and antimicrobial resistance

10:45 - 11:15

High frequency recombination in Bacteroides fragilis: diversity, virulence and antimicrobial resistance

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:45 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Challenges in the treatment of non-Candida albicans infections: a preclinical perspective

10:45 - 11:15

Challenges in the treatment of non-Candida albicans infections: a preclinical perspective

Antisense transcription interference and the tight repression of genes in budding yeast

10:45 - 11:15

Antisense transcription interference and the tight repression of genes in budding yeast

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

10:45 - 11:00

Posters, exhibition and refreshments

Linking genomic islands and bacterial population dynamics

10:45 - 11:15

Linking genomic islands and bacterial population dynamics

Breaking barriers: viral entry and infection of polarized cell surfaces

11:00 - 11:30

Breaking barriers: viral entry and infection of polarized cell surfaces

Offered oral - Comparative metabolomics of Antarctic and sub-Arctic Actinobacteria

11:00 - 11:15

Offered oral - Comparative metabolomics of Antarctic and sub-Arctic Actinobacteria

Filamentous fungal biofilms in drinking water distribution systems

11:00 - 11:30

Filamentous fungal biofilms in drinking water distribution systems

Regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division

11:00 - 11:30

Regulation of peptidoglycan synthesis during cell division

The hijacking of host gene enhancers by Epstein-Barr virus and its role in lymphoma development

11:00 - 11:30

The hijacking of host gene enhancers by Epstein-Barr virus and its role in lymphoma development

Offered oral - Microaerobiosis and intestinal epithelial contact influence virulence of enteroaggregative E. coli

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Microaerobiosis and intestinal epithelial contact influence virulence of enteroaggregative E. coli

Offered oral - Temporal and behavioural differences in phagocytosis of pathogenic fungi by peritoneal macrophages

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Temporal and behavioural differences in phagocytosis of pathogenic fungi by peritoneal macrophages

Offered oral - Antarctica cyanobacteria: from Scott's discovery expedition to freshwater microbialites

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Antarctica cyanobacteria: from Scott's discovery expedition to freshwater microbialites

Intergenic non-coding transcription utilises an RNA-based mechanism to drive transcriptional interference

11:15 - 11:45

Intergenic non-coding transcription utilises an RNA-based mechanism to drive transcriptional interference

Offered oral - Towards a true bacterial transcriptome: in vivo RNA-seq of an attaching and effacing pathogen

11:15 - 11:30

Offered oral - Towards a true bacterial transcriptome: in vivo RNA-seq of an attaching and effacing pathogen

FISHing anaerobes from mouth to gut: Who are the key players?

11:30 - 12:00

FISHing anaerobes from mouth to gut: Who are the key players?

Substitutions in influenza hemagglutinin for cross-species transmission

11:30 - 12:00

Substitutions in influenza hemagglutinin for cross-species transmission

Offered oral - Counteracting nutritional immunity: zinc assimilation by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Counteracting nutritional immunity: zinc assimilation by the human fungal pathogen Candida albicans

Offered oral - Responses of the soil microbiome to phosphate fertilisation in grassland

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Responses of the soil microbiome to phosphate fertilisation in grassland

Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the respiratory tract

11:30 - 12:00

Adaptation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the respiratory tract

Light harvesting: a critical role for the surfaces of photosynthetic bacteria

11:30 - 12:00

Light harvesting: a critical role for the surfaces of photosynthetic bacteria

Microbial GWAS and the biology of infection

11:30 - 12:00

Microbial GWAS and the biology of infection

Offered oral - Non-enveloped RNA viruses: escaping the endosome

11:30 - 11:45

Offered oral - Non-enveloped RNA viruses: escaping the endosome

Cryptococcus: cell invader and host hijacker

11:45 - 12:00

Cryptococcus: cell invader and host hijacker

Offered oral - Bioproduction of platform N-heterocycles using engineered E. coli strains

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Bioproduction of platform N-heterocycles using engineered E. coli strains

Offered oral - Spatiotemporal and biochemical analysis of nascent nuclear proteome and involvement of ICP22 during HSV-1 infection revealed by click chemistry

11:45 - 12:00

Offered oral - Spatiotemporal and biochemical analysis of nascent nuclear proteome and involvement of ICP22 during HSV-1 infection revealed by click chemistry

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Lunch and exhibition

12:00 - 13:00

Lunch and exhibition

Thursday 06 April, Afternoon

Propionbacterium acnes typing: insights into disease association

13:00 - 13:30

Propionbacterium acnes typing: insights into disease association

Offered oral - Intracellular invasion & carcinogenesis of an oral pathogen

13:00 - 13:15

Offered oral - Intracellular invasion & carcinogenesis of an oral pathogen

Polymicrobial infections: Building walls and making the host pay

13:00 - 13:30

Polymicrobial infections: Building walls and making the host pay

Type VI secretion system-mediated neighbor predation fosters horizontal gene transfer in Vibrio cholerae

13:00 - 13:30

Type VI secretion system-mediated neighbor predation fosters horizontal gene transfer in Vibrio cholerae

100 years after William Bateson – what can we learn about epistasis by today's statistical machine learning?

13:00 - 13:30

100 years after William Bateson – what can we learn about epistasis by today's statistical machine learning?

Liver specific microRNA-122: Biogenesis and role in hepatitis C virus replication

13:00 - 13:30

Liver specific microRNA-122: Biogenesis and role in hepatitis C virus replication

Offered oral - A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalization of Listeria monocytogenes

13:15 - 13:30

Offered oral - A role for host cell exocytosis in InlB-mediated internalization of Listeria monocytogenes

Offered oral - Propionbacterium acnes infection of the prostate gland: a modifiable risk-factor for the development of prostate cancer?

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Propionbacterium acnes infection of the prostate gland: a modifiable risk-factor for the development of prostate cancer?

Offered oral - Regulation of the BLOC3- and Rab32-dependent anti-microbial (BRAM) pathway

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Regulation of the BLOC3- and Rab32-dependent anti-microbial (BRAM) pathway

Studies on the virome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reveal novel dsRNA elements and mild hypervirulence

13:30 - 14:00

Studies on the virome of the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana reveal novel dsRNA elements and mild hypervirulence

Offered oral - Poacic acid and echinocandins inhibit fungal β-1,3-glucan synthesis via alternative mechanisms

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Poacic acid and echinocandins inhibit fungal β-1,3-glucan synthesis via alternative mechanisms

Offered oral - Large recombination events readily occuring in biofilm cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - Large recombination events readily occuring in biofilm cultures of Streptococcus pneumoniae

Offered oral - The gene expression signatures of model human cell lines infected with the Ebola virus, Makona variant or Reston virus

13:30 - 13:45

Offered oral - The gene expression signatures of model human cell lines infected with the Ebola virus, Makona variant or Reston virus

Offered oral - Characterisation of LuxS dependent biofilm formation by Clostridiodes difficile

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - Characterisation of LuxS dependent biofilm formation by Clostridiodes difficile

Legionella pneumophila targets the host sphingolipid metabolism and manipulates autophagy

13:45 - 14:15

Legionella pneumophila targets the host sphingolipid metabolism and manipulates autophagy

Cellulose – an extracellular matrix component of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms of many talents

13:45 - 14:15

Cellulose – an extracellular matrix component of Salmonella typhimurium biofilms of many talents

Offered oral - High resolution genomic view of cholera within Dhaka city

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - High resolution genomic view of cholera within Dhaka city

Offered oral - Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells: Potential targets for therapy in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

13:45 - 14:00

Offered oral - Respiratory virus infection up-regulates TRPV1, TRPA1 and ASICS3 receptors on airway cells: Potential targets for therapy in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Clostridium difficile – microbiota interactions in a gut model

14:00 - 14:30

Clostridium difficile – microbiota interactions in a gut model

The endobacterium of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus: bacterial genetic determinants tell us about physiology and co-evolution of an ancient association

14:00 - 14:30

The endobacterium of an arbuscular mycorrhizal fungus: bacterial genetic determinants tell us about physiology and co-evolution of an ancient association

Interleukin-22 signalling in hiPSC-derived intestinal organoids

14:00 - 14:30

Interleukin-22 signalling in hiPSC-derived intestinal organoids

Systems biology analysis of lytic HSV-1 infection

14:00 - 14:30

Systems biology analysis of lytic HSV-1 infection

New roles for the cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity

14:15 - 14:45

New roles for the cytoskeleton in cell-autonomous immunity

Offered oral - Coordination of cell wall synthesis and outer membrane constriction during E. coli cell division

14:15 - 14:30

Offered oral - Coordination of cell wall synthesis and outer membrane constriction during E. coli cell division

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Refreshments

14:30 - 15:00

Refreshments

Refreshments

14:30 - 14:45

Refreshments

Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in anaerobes: the Nim conundrum

14:45 - 15:15

Mechanisms of metronidazole resistance in anaerobes: the Nim conundrum

Refreshments

14:45 - 15:15

Refreshments

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

14:45 - 15:15

Heterogeneity and polymicrobial interactions in biofilms

Microfluidics and virtual microfluidics for microbial genome sequencing

14:45 - 15:15

Microfluidics and virtual microfluidics for microbial genome sequencing

Cracking the crystal shell: S-layer structure and function

15:00 - 15:30

Cracking the crystal shell: S-layer structure and function

Fusobacterium necrophorum: just a sore throat?

15:15 - 15:45

Fusobacterium necrophorum: just a sore throat?

Viral genome hide and seek: encapsidation versus host immunity

15:15 - 15:30

Viral genome hide and seek: encapsidation versus host immunity

Offered oral - Molecular basis of pathogenic group B Streptococcus interactions with fungus Candida albicans

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Molecular basis of pathogenic group B Streptococcus interactions with fungus Candida albicans

Offered oral - Use of machine-learning (SVM) for source attribution of Salmonella typhymurium and Escherichia coli

15:15 - 15:30

Offered oral - Use of machine-learning (SVM) for source attribution of Salmonella typhymurium and Escherichia coli

The HIV glycan shield

15:30 - 16:00

The HIV glycan shield

Molecular analysis of complex bacterial–fungal interactions

15:30 - 16:00

Molecular analysis of complex bacterial–fungal interactions

Offered oral - Expression of the Escherichia coli cell division zipA gene at different growth rates

15:30 - 15:45

Offered oral - Expression of the Escherichia coli cell division zipA gene at different growth rates

Using single-cell transcriptomics to understand cellular heterogeneity

15:30 - 16:00

Using single-cell transcriptomics to understand cellular heterogeneity

Nidogens are therapeutic targets for the prevention of tetanus

15:45 - 16:15

Nidogens are therapeutic targets for the prevention of tetanus

Bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics

15:45 - 16:15

Bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan architecture and dynamics

Entry and uncoating strategies followed by animal viruses

16:00 - 16:30

Entry and uncoating strategies followed by animal viruses

Offered oral - Regulation of Enterococcus faecalis cell chain length is required for virulence in the zebrafish model of infection

16:15 - 16:30

Offered oral - Regulation of Enterococcus faecalis cell chain length is required for virulence in the zebrafish model of infection
  • Abstracts

    Abstract submission is now closed and all submitters will have received their notifications.

    For all presenters who have successfully been awarded a poster or an offered oral slot, please ensure you have informed the Conferences office by Monday 6 February if you are unable to attend.

    Any presenters who are not registered to attend Conference by 23:59 on Monday 20 March will be removed from the abstract book and programme.

    Presenting a poster

    Poster numbers will be provided one week before the Conference and a poster registration desk will be onsite for support throughout the event.

    Those who are presenting a poster must ensure the work is presented as below. Incorrectly formatted posters will not be displayed.

    • Poster size: A0 size 841mm(w) x 1189mm(h) – your poster must not exceed these measurements.
    • Poster layout: MUST BE portrait orientation.
    • Posters will be displayed on poster boards measuring 1m(w) x 2m(h), one to a side.
    • Posters can ONLY be fixed by Velcro (provided at conference).
    • Your viewing time and details on setting up and taking down will be advised prior to the Conference.

    We have produced a guide on how to give a poster presentation, which can be downloaded below:

    How to... give a poster presentation (PDF)

    Giving an oral presentation

    Please check the online programme for your allocated time slot. You can search the programme using a keyword or name/

    Presenters will be required to upload their talk in good time at the speaker preview suite.

    In order to ensure your presentation runs smoothly, you are asked to comply with the following:

    • PowerPoint presentations – PC version – are brought to the conference on a USB memory stick.
    • PowerPoint presentations – Mac version – can only be accepted if you bring your own laptop and connecting cables.
    • Please ensure you have made an allowance for questions following your talk in your allocated times.
    • Forums and Offered Orals in our main symposia are 15 minutes long unless notified otherwise.
    • Offered Orals in our Virus Workshops are 12 minutes long.

    We have produced a guide on how to give an oral presentation, which can be downloaded below:

    How to... give an oral presentation (PDF)

    A companion video on top tips for presentation is also available:

    Flash poster presentations

    At our 2017 Conference, we will be showcasing some of the posters on display during our flash poster presentations. These will take place at our Society stand every lunchtime. Flash poster presenters will be selected in advance by the session organisers and those chosen to take part will be informed prior to the Conference. If chosen, you will need to:

    • Provide a maximum of three summary slides on PowerPoint to conferences@microbiologysociety.org.
    • Prepare a two-minute presentation/pitch.
    • Answer one quick-fire question on the presented work.

    Poster prizes

    There will be four poster prizes available to recognise the best poster presenters over the course of the entire Annual Conference. Please see below for details of each prize. All poster prize winners will be invited to present their poster again at the Society's Annual General Meeting in September 2017.

    Microbiology Society Journals' 'Most Promising Science' Prize

    All poster presenters will be considered for the Microbiology Society Journals' 'Most Promising Science' Prize. At least two prizes will be awarded to posters that present particularly compelling or novel research within the subject areas of the following Society journals: MicrobiologyJournal of General VirologyJournal of Medical Microbiology and Microbial Genomics. This prize will be judged by Editors from all journals, with the winner receiving a small cash prize and certificate. For more information on the journals, visit www.microbiologyresearch.org.

    Principal Investigator Poster Prize

    All poster presenters will be considered for the Principal Investigator Poster Prize. Three prizes will be awarded to excellent posters based on the innovation and novelty of the research presented. This prize will be judged by members of the Society's Divisions, Counil and Committees, with the winners receiving a small cash prize and certificate.

    Early Career Microbiologists' Forum Poster Prize

    All members of the Early Career Microbiologists' (ECM) Forum who are presenting posters will be considered for the ECM Forum Poster Prize. This prize will be judged by the Executive Committee and will recognise the most promising ECM presenters. The winners will receive a prize and certificate.

    People's Choice Poster Prize

    All poster presenters will be entered into the People's Choice Poster Prize, which will identify the three most popular posters presented during the Annual Conference. All delegates will be asked to choose their favourite three posters that they visited and submit these on the voting slip provided in their delegate bag. Winners will be notified by 6 May 2017.

    Sir Howard Dalton Young Microbiologist of the Year Competition

    Each year, the Young Microbiologist of the Year Competition recognises and rewards excellence in science communication by a Microbiology Society Member who is a postgraduate student or postdoctoral researcher, having gained their PhD in the last two years.

    During the Annual Conference, judges will be visiting posters and listening to offered orals by delegates who have entered the competition via the abstract submission. Finalists will be notified in early summer if they have been selected, and will be invited to give a 10-minute oral presentation (plus 5 minutes for questions) at the final at the Society’s Annual General Meeting in September 2017.

  • Registration

    Registration is now open.

    Register now

    What's included in your registration fee?
    • Admission to all scientific sessions
    • Admission to lunch time events
    • Full access to the trade exhibition
    • Full access to scientific poster sessions
    • Hot buffet lunch Monday to Thursday
    • Tea and coffee breaks Monday to Thursday
    • Two free drinks vouchers during the poster viewing sessions on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday evening
    • A delegate bag and conference material
    • A conference programme book
    • Access to an online abstracts book
    • Certificate of Attendance
    • Access to CPD points

    Registration Categories
    (all rates are per day)

    Early bird rate

    Extended to

    Thursday 16 March 17

    Full price rate

    Available until

    Friday 23 March 17

    Late rate

    Onsite only from

    Sunday 2 April 2017

     

    PER PERSON/

    PER DAY

    PER PERSON/  

    PER DAY

    PER PERSON/

    PER DAY

    Non-member

    £200

    £210

    £220

    Full Member

    £100

    £110

    £120

    Full-Concessionary Member

    £60

    £70

    £80

    Honorary Members

    International Associate Member – Worldwide (excluding lower-middle and low income economies)

    £100

    £110

    £120

    International Associate Member – Resident in lower-middle income economies*

    £60

    £70

    £80

    International Associate Member – Resident in low income economies**

    £55

    £65

    £75

    Postgraduate Student Member

    £55

    £65

    £75

    Undergraduate Student Member

    CVN Member

    (Attendance Tuesday PM and all day Wednesday only)

    £120

    £130

    £140

    *See: List of lower-middle income economies

    **See: List of low income economies

    Social & Networking Events

    When registering online you will also be able to secure your place on the following additional events. Please note, places are very limited and once fully allocated these events will no longer be open for bookings.


    Event

    Limited Places

    Per Person

    Sunday night pre-Conference networking event with dinner at the EICC

    £20

    Social programme Monday night: Quiz night with dinner at the Ghillie Dhu

    £25

    Social programme Wednesday night: Traditional ceilidh dinner and dance at The Hub

    £50

    Pre-Conference networking event

    Attending your first conference? Maybe you’re travelling alone, daunted by the prospect of meeting new people, or maybe you’d just like to brush off your networking skills ready for a busy conference ahead. Whatever your reason for attending, the pre-conference networking event is the place to be on the Sunday before the Annual Conference. You’ll get to know many other delegates whilst taking part in interactive games, and also have the chance to practice networking with senior members of the Society. Why not take the opportunity to gather up an audience for your presentation later in the week, and join us as we kick start the conference.

    Tickets are available for £20, this includes a packed schedule of activities, dinner and drinks. Book is via conference registration – make sure to book early to avoid disappointment: this event sells out very quickly. 

    Feedback from delegates at previous events:

    "This was a great way to meet new people, especially when I didn't know many."
    "I got to meet people at all different levels within academia in all different specialisms."
    "The highlight for me was exchanging contact details with other delegates who had useful information about my project."
    "As an undergraduate student, I have really benefitted from meeting new people and learning how to speak with scientists further in their career."

    Conference Grants

    Applications for Society Conference Grants for Annual Conference 2017 are now closed. Eligible Full, Full Concessionary and Postgraduate Student Members who are ineligible for Society Conference Grants may apply to the 1 March deadline of Travel Grants. Please contact grants@microbiologysociety.org for further queries.

    Registration confirmation

    Upon registration you should receive an automated confirmation email. Please contact conferences@microbiologysociety.org if after 24 hours this has not been received.

    Visa applications

    If you need a letter of invitation for a visa application, we will be happy to supply this after we have received full payment. To find out if you need a visa to visit the UK, please visit the UK visa and immigration website.

    It is the policy of the Microbiology Society not to supply an invitation letter to any delegate without payment and we will not reply to any request from an unregistered delegate. When the delegate has paid, the Conference office will email back a confirmation/receipt letter and, upon request, a letter of invitation, which may be used to obtain the necessary visa.

    Please note that all conference delegates are responsible for their own travel and visa arrangements; the Microbiology Society will not take any responsibility for travel or visa problems.

    Payment information

    All registration fees must be paid in full BEFORE arrival at the conference. Any outstanding registration fees must be paid before admittance will be granted to the conference.

    Cancellations

    Refunds are not provided, however substitutions of attendees can be made at any time by contacting conferences@microbiologysociety.org.

  • Venue and directions

    The conference will be held at the Edinburgh International Conference Centre (EICC):

    Edinburgh International Conference Centre
    The Exchange
    Edinburgh
    EH3 8EE

    General enquiries: +44(0)131 300 3000
    Email: sales@eicc.co.uk

    Directions

    By car

    If you are travelling using a sat nav, please use the postcode EH3 8EE. The main entrance is on Morrison Street.

    By air

    Edinburgh International Airport is within 6 miles of the EICC. The Airlink 100 runs between Edinburgh Airport and the city centre every 10 minutes at peak times, with the journey taking 20 minutes. This service starts at 4.30am and runs until 12.22am. Tickets cost £3.50 single and £6.00 return. Delegates are advised to disembark at Haymarket Railway Station and to follow signs for EICC on foot (5-minute walk).

    The N22 bus also departs from the Aiport and runs every 30 minutes through the night until the Airlink service starts again. For more information about these services, visit www.flybybus.com.

    EICC has an established relationship with Virgin Atlantic, who can offer discounted flights between Edinburgh and London on their new service, Virgin Atlantic Little Red. For more information on discounted flights, visit the Virgin Atlantic website.

    By rail

    Edinburgh has two railway stations – Waverley and Haymarket. Waverley is the main station, with direct routes to many cities across the UK. For more information on travelling by rail to Edinburgh, visit East Coast Trains or the National Rail website.

    Virgin Trains

    Virgin Trains offer discounted group travel for groups of between three and nine passengers travelling together. This currently stands at a 20% discount off Advance tickets booked through their website – for more information, visit the group tickets page of their website.

    By bus

    Edinburgh's main bus terminal is located at St Andrews Square. Visit Lothian Buses for more information on local bus services.

    Coach

    For information about travel by coach please visit the National Express website.

    Car parking

    There are many car parks within close walking distance of the EICC. Please see the EICC website for more details.

  • Accommodation

    Edinburgh is a popular destination, therefore we highly recommend you secure your accommodation as soon as possible.

    To aid you with this process, our booking agent Reservation Highway has secured a range of accommodation options to suit all budgets throughout Edinburgh, at discounted rates.

    Annual Conference 2017 Hotel List

    All accommodation can be booked online through Reservation Highway's website, or alternatively you can complete the offline booking form, which can be downloaded below:

    Annual Conference 2017 Booking Form

    For further information and booking, please contact Reservation Highway:
    Phone: +44 (0)1423 525 577
    Email: admin@reservation-highway.co.uk

  • Social programme

    On the Monday and Wednesday nights of Annual Conference 2017, we have organised two great social events for delegates. Please see below for more information.

    Monday 3 April – Quiz night

    Ghillie Dhu
    2 Rutland Place
    Edinburgh
    EH1 2AD

    Put your general knowledge to the test by joining our fun quiz night on Monday evening! The quiz will be held at the impressive Ghillie Dhu from 20:00–23:00.

    The night will start with a glass of something fizzy, followed by the quiz, alongside a fork buffet.

    The quiz will start at 20:45 so make sure to be there with plenty of time to get yourself onto a team. We advise teams of 8–10 people.

    The £25 ticket includes a welcome drink, fork buffet supper and entry to the quiz. Make sure to book your place soon as space is limited. A cash bar will be available throughout the evening.

    Wednesday 5 April – Ceilidh

    The Hub ceilidh

    The Hub
    Castlehill
    Edinburgh
    EH1 2NE

    Join us on Wednesday at The Hub for dinner and dancing to celebrate the last night at the Annual Conference. Guests will be able to enjoy a glass of sparkling wine on arrival, and then a five-option buffet dinner and half a bottle of wine per person.

    All of this will be followed by a highly recommended, three-piece ceilidh band called Reel Time, who will get you onto the dancefloor to learn some traditional but simple ceilidh dancing. A cash bar will be available for those who wish to party into the night.

    Tickets cost £50 and can be purchased online when registering for the Conference. We recommend booking early as places are strictly limited.

  • General information

    If this is your first conference, we have created a guide to help you get the most out of your attendance. This can be downloaded below:

    How to... get the most out of your first conference (PDF)

    Registration

    Registration opens at 07:30 each day and will be located by the main entrance at the EICC. If you have any questions or need support, please visit the Conferences team here.

    Badges

    Badges are issued by the Microbiology Society and are only to be used by the named person for the days indicated. For security purposes, badges must be worn at all times during the Conference.

    Certificates of Attendance

    A certificate of attendance can be requested at the Registration Desk or by emailing conferences@microbiologysociety.org

    Continuing Professional Development (CPD)

    The Conference has been accredited by the Royal Society of Biology (144 credits), the Royal College of Pathologists (34 credits), and the Institute of Biomedical Science (category Other).

    Those wishing to claim CPD credits should sign a daily register held at the Professional Development information desk, which is located in the exhibition hall. Further information can be requested by email at profdev@microbiologysociety.org.

    Mobile phones

    Please ensure your mobile phone is switched to silent mode or off during the scientific sessions.

    Programme changes

    While every effort has been made to ensure the programme is accurate, changes are unavoidable. We will ensure updates are provided throughout the Conference and update our online programme.

    Posters

    Posters will be presented during the lunch and evening breaks and posters will be rotated during the conference. An abstracts book can be located on our website and links to abstracts for oral presentations are now in our online programme.

    Passport to Prizes

    For a chance to win with our Passport to Prizes competition, you need to complete the quiz sheet in your delegate bag. The prize draw will take place on Wednesday evening at the stand and your entries must handed at the registration desk by lunchtime on Wednesday.

    Photography and filming at the Conference

    The Society will be carrying out filming and photography throughout the Conference. The images and videos will be used to promote the Conference and the activities of the Society. They may be used online, in Society publications, or for other PR and marketing purposes.

    If you do not wish to appear in photographs or films, please make this known to a member of the team.

    Recording

    Only recording set up with prior permission is authorised.

    Dietary requirements

    All disclosed dietary requirements made at the point of registration have been shared with the catering team at the EICC in advance. However, please ensure you ask for advice if required and the catering team will do their best to accommodate your needs.

    Twitter

    Delegates, exhibitors and speakers tweeting from the Conference are invited to include the hashtag #Microbio17 in their tweets. You can follow the Society on Twitter @MicrobioSoc.

  • Exhibition

    Our Annual Conference provides the ultimate gathering location for over 1,200 microbiologists and other professionals of related fields from over 20 countries. The exhibition is located in a high-traffic area, where all conference meals, coffee breaks and drinks receptions will be held, offering an excellent opportunity to demonstrate your products, interact with conference delegates and maximise leads.

    You can choose from Gold, Silver and Bronze packages, or Pick and Mix options that can be tailored to your needs and your budget.

    Detailed information about available exhibition packages can be found in the Exhibition and Sponsorship Pack, which can be downloaded below:

    Annual Conference 2017 Exhibition & Sponsorship Pack (PDF)

    Exhibition floor plan

    Download the latest floor plan here:

    Annual Conference 2017 Exhibition Floor Plan (PDF)

    Registration form

    To book your exhibition or sponsorship place, please download the fillable registration form below and return the completed form to conferences@microbiologysociety.org

    Annual Conference 2017 Exhibition & Sponsorship Registration Form (PDF)

    Other sponsorship opportunities

    This year, we are able to offer bespoke sponsorship opportunities that can be found on page 12 of the Exhibition & Sponsorship Pack. Please contact us for further information.

    If you are interested in exhibiting at Annual Conference 2017 or any of our other events, please contact conferences@microbiologysociety.org.

    Exhibitors

    Exhibitor r-biopharm Exhibitor Stratech Exhibitor Vitech Scientific
    Exhibitor PHE Exhibitor microbes NG Exhibitor New England BioLabs
    Exhibitor Li-cor Exhibitor Apollo Scientific Exhibitor AusDiagnostics
    Exhibitor Constant Systems Ltd Exhibitor Electroblab Biotech Exhibitor Takara
    Exhibitor MP Exhibitor Q Medical Technologies Exhibitor Hybrigenics
    Exhibitor Applikon Exhibitor Bioline  

    Sponsors

    Exhibitor Oxford Biosystems Exhibitor Caister Press Exhibitor Royal Society Publishing
    Exhibitor Elsevier Exhibitor Wiley Exhibitor Microorganisms
    Exhibitor Nature Microbiology Exhibitor Pyro Science  

     

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