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Annual Conference 2015

30 March - 2 April 2015
  1. Overview
  2. Programme
  3. Abstracts
  4. Registration
  5. Accommodation
  6. Venue and directions
  7. General info
  8. Exhibitors
Annual Conference 2015

Overview

The Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference 2015 was held from the 30 March to 2 April at the ICC, Birmingham, UK.

The Society’s Annual Conference attracts over 1,000 attendees from the UK and further afield and is Europe’s largest annual gathering of microbiologists. Whether you are a veteran microbiologist or just starting out in your career, attending the Society for General Microbiology Annual Conference is a must for all of those with an interest in microbiology.

If you have any questions please email conferences@microbiologysociety.org

Follow us on Twitter (@MicrobioSoc). Information on the Annual Conference 2015 can be found using the hashtag: #sgmbham

 

Programme

  1. Monday
  2. Tuesday
  3. Wednesday
  4. Thursday
Monday 30 March: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Hall 19:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This symposium will delve into the evolution of human, animal and plant viruses. As well as considering natural evolution, the impact of human intervention will be explored; to what extent do vaccination and antiviral treatment drive selection? Have we learnt any lessons about the injudicious use of antimicrobials? Genetic engineering (including ‘gain-of-function’ studies) can aid our understanding of what makes viruses tick, but should studies that generate potentially dangerous viruses be censored – or not conducted in the first place? This and who should decide (science or society?) will be debated.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Antimicrobial resistance

    Hall 59:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Antimicrobial resistance

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections represent one of the most serious threats facing our world today. This symposium will explore various aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including its origins, reservoirs, economics and ecology, and also novel ways in which it might be combatted.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Hall 8b9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbial evolution is key to understanding many aspects of biology including ecology, life at extremes of temperature, pressure and aridity as well as pathogenicity. With the latter in mind, it was important to develop the symposium to illustrate that these interactions are as old as life itself, though at a more basal level! This symposium will bring together many leading microbiologists working in a diverse range of specialties related to early microbial evolution that would be of interest to many delegates. The intended audience will be wide-ranging and include many who have an interest in the diverse aspects of paleobiology, ecology as well as pathogenicity.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbiome in health and disease

    Hall 11a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Microbiome in health and disease

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbiome in Health and Disease: For this session we have invited world leading scientists in the area to provide insight into how the microbiome interacts with the host and promotes/maintains health and its role in disease. This is a rapidly growing field and the speakers will provide us with current information on various microbiomes in the human body.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
18:15
  • Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Hall 112:00 - 17:30

    Close
    Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    This symposium will delve into the evolution of human, animal and plant viruses. As well as considering natural evolution, the impact of human intervention will be explored; to what extent do vaccination and antiviral treatment drive selection? Have we learnt any lessons about the injudicious use of antimicrobials? Genetic engineering (including ‘gain-of-function’ studies) can aid our understanding of what makes viruses tick, but should studies that generate potentially dangerous viruses be censored – or not conducted in the first place? This and who should decide (science or society?) will be debated.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Antimicrobial resistance

    Hall 512:00 - 18:00

    Close
    Antimicrobial resistance

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 12:00 - 18:00    Add to outlook

    Antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections represent one of the most serious threats facing our world today. This symposium will explore various aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including its origins, reservoirs, economics and ecology, and also novel ways in which it might be combatted.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Hall 8a12:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    While very significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding how microbes respond to changes in their environment, in terms of gene expression and metabolism, much less is known about how environmental cues are detected in the first instance. This meeting aims to bring together some exciting recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that allow microbes to perceive their environments and how these sensory signals are integrated into pathways that generate appropriate outputs.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Hall 8b12:00 - 18:15

    Close
    The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    Microbial evolution is key to understanding many aspects of biology including ecology, life at extremes of temperature, pressure and aridity as well as pathogenicity. With the latter in mind, it was important to develop the symposium to illustrate that these interactions are as old as life itself, though at a more basal level! This symposium will bring together many leading microbiologists working in a diverse range of specialties related to early microbial evolution that would be of interest to many delegates. The intended audience will be wide-ranging and include many who have an interest in the diverse aspects of paleobiology, ecology as well as pathogenicity.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbiome in health and disease

    Hall 11a12:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Microbiome in health and disease

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    Microbiome in Health and Disease: For this session we have invited world leading scientists in the area to provide insight into how the microbiome interacts with the host and promotes/maintains health and its role in disease. This is a rapidly growing field and the speakers will provide us with current information on various microbiomes in the human body.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Tuesday 31 March: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Hall 19:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This symposium will delve into the evolution of human, animal and plant viruses. As well as considering natural evolution, the impact of human intervention will be explored; to what extent do vaccination and antiviral treatment drive selection? Have we learnt any lessons about the injudicious use of antimicrobials? Genetic engineering (including ‘gain-of-function’ studies) can aid our understanding of what makes viruses tick, but should studies that generate potentially dangerous viruses be censored – or not conducted in the first place? This and who should decide (science or society?) will be debated.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Antimicrobial resistance

    Hall 59:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Antimicrobial resistance

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections represent one of the most serious threats facing our world today. This symposium will explore various aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including its origins, reservoirs, economics and ecology, and also novel ways in which it might be combatted.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Hall 8a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    While very significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding how microbes respond to changes in their environment, in terms of gene expression and metabolism, much less is known about how environmental cues are detected in the first instance. This meeting aims to bring together some exciting recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that allow microbes to perceive their environments and how these sensory signals are integrated into pathways that generate appropriate outputs.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Hall 8b9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbial evolution is key to understanding many aspects of biology including ecology, life at extremes of temperature, pressure and aridity as well as pathogenicity. With the latter in mind, it was important to develop the symposium to illustrate that these interactions are as old as life itself, though at a more basal level! This symposium will bring together many leading microbiologists working in a diverse range of specialties related to early microbial evolution that would be of interest to many delegates. The intended audience will be wide-ranging and include many who have an interest in the diverse aspects of paleobiology, ecology as well as pathogenicity.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbiome in health and disease

    Hall 11a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Microbiome in health and disease

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Microbiome in Health and Disease: For this session we have invited world leading scientists in the area to provide insight into how the microbiome interacts with the host and promotes/maintains health and its role in disease. This is a rapidly growing field and the speakers will provide us with current information on various microbiomes in the human body.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
18:15
  • Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Hall 10a12:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Hall 112:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    This symposium will delve into the evolution of human, animal and plant viruses. As well as considering natural evolution, the impact of human intervention will be explored; to what extent do vaccination and antiviral treatment drive selection? Have we learnt any lessons about the injudicious use of antimicrobials? Genetic engineering (including ‘gain-of-function’ studies) can aid our understanding of what makes viruses tick, but should studies that generate potentially dangerous viruses be censored – or not conducted in the first place? This and who should decide (science or society?) will be debated.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Antimicrobial resistance

    Hall 512:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Antimicrobial resistance

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    Antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections represent one of the most serious threats facing our world today. This symposium will explore various aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including its origins, reservoirs, economics and ecology, and also novel ways in which it might be combatted.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Hall 8a12:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    While very significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding how microbes respond to changes in their environment, in terms of gene expression and metabolism, much less is known about how environmental cues are detected in the first instance. This meeting aims to bring together some exciting recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that allow microbes to perceive their environments and how these sensory signals are integrated into pathways that generate appropriate outputs.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Hall 8b12:00 - 18:15

    Close
    The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    Microbial evolution is key to understanding many aspects of biology including ecology, life at extremes of temperature, pressure and aridity as well as pathogenicity. With the latter in mind, it was important to develop the symposium to illustrate that these interactions are as old as life itself, though at a more basal level! This symposium will bring together many leading microbiologists working in a diverse range of specialties related to early microbial evolution that would be of interest to many delegates. The intended audience will be wide-ranging and include many who have an interest in the diverse aspects of paleobiology, ecology as well as pathogenicity.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbiome in health and disease

    Hall 11a12:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Microbiome in health and disease

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    Microbiome in Health and Disease: For this session we have invited world leading scientists in the area to provide insight into how the microbiome interacts with the host and promotes/maintains health and its role in disease. This is a rapidly growing field and the speakers will provide us with current information on various microbiomes in the human body.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Hall 9, Hall 112:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Room: Hall 9, Hall 1
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Wednesday 1 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Hall 10a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbial archaeology

    Hall 79:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Microbial archaeology

    Room: Hall 7
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Over the past 10 years the development of whole genome amplification, next generation sequencing and and mass-spectrophotometry techniques has allowed researchers to deep sequence ancient DNA, and analyse lipds and poteins in archeological samples. This session will illustrate how researchers are taking advantage of this capability to study pathogens (i.e. Y. pestis, TB, leprosy, potato blight) associated with past infections of animals, humans and plants. The application of metagenomic approaches to study ancient microbiomes will be illustrated by a talk on the ancient oral microbiome.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes

    Hall 8b9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Over the past 1 to 2 billion years of evolution, microbial eukaryotes have invaded a wide spectrum of habitats on our planet, and as a result we are observing a broad variety of organisms with unique adaptations on their external and internal morphology including their organelles. For example, a lot of these unicellular organisms have adapted to the low oxygen environments by the loss of aerobic respiration and by modifying their mitochondria into one of a number of types of mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), including the hydrogen producing “hydrogenosomes” and or the entirely remnant mitochondria so-called “mitosomes”. Functions that have been considered a prerequisite for the existence of canonical mitochondria or the cell itself such as oxidative phosphorylation, heme and phospholipids biosynthesis, calcium homeostasis, programmed cell death and iron-sulphur cluster assembly, are currently eliminated one-by-one in a range of eukaryotic cells and more questions are arising on the roles of mitochondria in the different organisms and subsequently the raison d’etre of the organelle itself. Despite this diversification, all known eukaryotes possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, suggesting the origin of mitochondria to the last eukaryotic common ancestor.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

    Hall 19:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This workshop will focus on the regulation of viral and host gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by virally-encoded factors and address how viruses control the replication of their genomes.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

    Hall 59:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Understanding disease development mechanistically at the cellular, genetic and whole organism level is a vital element in the development of novel therapeutic strategies such as vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. To this end, this workshop will serve as a forum for the presentation of new and exciting data pertaining to all aspects of the pathogenesis of virus infection.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

    Hall 8a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The availability of antiviral small molecules and vaccines has historically lagged behind those targeting bacteria. Accordingly, the public health issues represented by both common and emerging virus infections are considerable, with effective treatments lacking in many cases. Research aimed at translating laboratory findings into either novel or improved anti-viral strategies is therefore a priority. This workshop will highlight ongoing research into burgeoning therapies for important human and animal viral pathogens, encompassing all stages of therapeutic development ranging from the test tube to in vivo studies.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

    Hall 69:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

    Room: Hall 6
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Virus evolution can affect important characteristics such as replication host range, tropism, and pathogenesis. On the other hand, there are constraints imposed by nucleotide sequences and proteins they encode. This workshop will address questions related to the topics above.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Clinical virology

    Hall 99:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Clinical virology

    Room: Hall 9
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Hall 10b9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Room: Hall 10b
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Offered papers will be welcome in any area related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level. Papers on interactions between non-pathogenic prokaryotes or indigenous microbiota and the host will also be welcome.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Environmental and applied microbiology forum

    Hall 11a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Environmental and applied microbiology forum

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Offered papers are welcomed focusing on any area in microbial ecology, including (non-human) host-microbe communities and interactions, marine and freshwater microbiology, soil and geomicrobiology, and air-, cryo- and extremophile microbiology. Papers on microbe-mediated biodegradation and bioremediation will also be welcome.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Hall 99:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Room: Hall 9
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
Afternoon
12:00
20:00
  • Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Hall 10a12:00 - 12:10

    Close
    Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 12:00 - 12:10    Add to outlook

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbial archaeology

    Hall 712:00 - 14:00

    Close
    Microbial archaeology

    Room: Hall 7
    Time: 12:00 - 14:00    Add to outlook

    Over the past 10 years the development of whole genome amplification, next generation sequencing and and mass-spectrophotometry techniques has allowed researchers to deep sequence ancient DNA, and analyse lipds and poteins in archeological samples. This session will illustrate how researchers are taking advantage of this capability to study pathogens (i.e. Y. pestis, TB, leprosy, potato blight) associated with past infections of animals, humans and plants. The application of metagenomic approaches to study ancient microbiomes will be illustrated by a talk on the ancient oral microbiome.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Microbes in space

    Hall 11b12:00 - 17:30

    Close
    Microbes in space

    Room: Hall 11b
    Time: 12:00 - 17:30    Add to outlook

    The vast and hostile environment of outer space represents a major challenge to all forms of life; exposure to microgravity, extremes of temperature, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles within a vacuum is guaranteed. However, experiments performed aboard Earth-orbiting spacecraft indicate that some microorganisms are able to survive outside these platforms for lengthy periods of time and there is compelling evidence that many microbes respond to the unique environment associated with spaceflight in ways that shed light on their adaptive behaviour. Currently, the primary platform for conducting research into the response of microbes to the space environment is the International Space Station, a facility supporting a number of well-equipped laboratories that has been continuously manned and able to conduct scientific experiments since 2000. Following a UK governmental decision in November 2012 to subscribe to the European Space Agency’s Programme for Life and Physical Sciences, it was recently announced that Major Tim Peake, the first Briton to be selected as an astronaut by ESA, will spend time on the ISS in late 2015. He will undertake scientific research with the potential to include microbiological experiments on his agenda. The session will present Major Peake’s plans and review the current state of knowledge of the behaviour of microbes in real and simulated space environments.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes

    Hall 8b12:00 - 20:00

    Close
    Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes

    Room: Hall 8b
    Time: 12:00 - 20:00    Add to outlook

    Over the past 1 to 2 billion years of evolution, microbial eukaryotes have invaded a wide spectrum of habitats on our planet, and as a result we are observing a broad variety of organisms with unique adaptations on their external and internal morphology including their organelles. For example, a lot of these unicellular organisms have adapted to the low oxygen environments by the loss of aerobic respiration and by modifying their mitochondria into one of a number of types of mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), including the hydrogen producing “hydrogenosomes” and or the entirely remnant mitochondria so-called “mitosomes”. Functions that have been considered a prerequisite for the existence of canonical mitochondria or the cell itself such as oxidative phosphorylation, heme and phospholipids biosynthesis, calcium homeostasis, programmed cell death and iron-sulphur cluster assembly, are currently eliminated one-by-one in a range of eukaryotic cells and more questions are arising on the roles of mitochondria in the different organisms and subsequently the raison d’etre of the organelle itself. Despite this diversification, all known eukaryotes possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, suggesting the origin of mitochondria to the last eukaryotic common ancestor.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

    Hall 112:00 - 18:15

    Close
    Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

    Room: Hall 1
    Time: 12:00 - 18:15    Add to outlook

    This workshop will focus on the regulation of viral and host gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by virally-encoded factors and address how viruses control the replication of their genomes.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

    Hall 512:00 - 14:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 12:00 - 14:00    Add to outlook

    Understanding disease development mechanistically at the cellular, genetic and whole organism level is a vital element in the development of novel therapeutic strategies such as vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. To this end, this workshop will serve as a forum for the presentation of new and exciting data pertaining to all aspects of the pathogenesis of virus infection.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

    Hall 8a12:00 - 14:00

    Close
    Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 12:00 - 14:00    Add to outlook

    The availability of antiviral small molecules and vaccines has historically lagged behind those targeting bacteria. Accordingly, the public health issues represented by both common and emerging virus infections are considerable, with effective treatments lacking in many cases. Research aimed at translating laboratory findings into either novel or improved anti-viral strategies is therefore a priority. This workshop will highlight ongoing research into burgeoning therapies for important human and animal viral pathogens, encompassing all stages of therapeutic development ranging from the test tube to in vivo studies.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

    Hall 612:00 - 13:30

    Close
    Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

    Room: Hall 6
    Time: 12:00 - 13:30    Add to outlook

    Virus evolution can affect important characteristics such as replication host range, tropism, and pathogenesis. On the other hand, there are constraints imposed by nucleotide sequences and proteins they encode. This workshop will address questions related to the topics above.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Innate immunity

    Hall 512:00 - 17:25

    Close
    Virus workshop: Innate immunity

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 12:00 - 17:25    Add to outlook

    The innate immune system represents the first line of defence of all living organisms against infection, and in recent years our knowledge of the battle between viruses and innate immunity has increased substantially. This workshop will highlight novel host defence mechanisms and uncover a myriad of virus evasion strategies.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus workshop: Plant virology

    Hall 10a12:00 - 16:30

    Close
    Virus workshop: Plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 12:00 - 16:30    Add to outlook

    The is a joint workshop co-hosted by the Microbiology Society Virus Division and the Association of Applied Biologists Plant Virology Group. The workshop will cover all aspects of applied plant virology from academic and translational research. The topics covered will include novel virus discovery, diagnostics, epidemiology, virus evolution, and plant-virus interactions.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Hall 10b12:00 - 13:00

    Close
    Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Room: Hall 10b
    Time: 12:00 - 13:00    Add to outlook

    Offered papers will be welcome in any area related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level. Papers on interactions between non-pathogenic prokaryotes or indigenous microbiota and the host will also be welcome.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Environmental and applied microbiology forum

    Hall 11a12:00 - 13:00

    Close
    Environmental and applied microbiology forum

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 12:00 - 13:00    Add to outlook

    Offered papers are welcomed focusing on any area in microbial ecology, including (non-human) host-microbe communities and interactions, marine and freshwater microbiology, soil and geomicrobiology, and air-, cryo- and extremophile microbiology. Papers on microbe-mediated biodegradation and bioremediation will also be welcome.

    Click here to view the session detail
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  • Prokaryotic genetics forum

    Hall 11a12:00 - 18:00

    Close
    Prokaryotic genetics forum

    Room: Hall 11a
    Time: 12:00 - 18:00    Add to outlook

    Offered papers on all aspects of the genes and genomes of prokaryotes and their mobile elements will be considered, including their sequencing, transcription, translation, regulation, chromosome dynamics, gene transfer, population genetics and evolution, taxonomy and systematics, comparative genomics, metagenomics, bioinformatics, and synthetic biology.

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  • Prokaryotic cell biology forum

    Hall 10b12:00 - 17:00

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    Prokaryotic cell biology forum

    Room: Hall 10b
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    This forum will consider work on all fundamental aspects of the physiology, biochemistry and structure of prokaryotic cells. This includes metabolism, synthesis and transport of macromolecules, membrane transport of ions and small molecules, the cell cycle, cell architecture, differentiation, sensing and cellular responses, signalling and communication, bioenergetics and the structure, function and mode of action of microbial factors. Papers on the engineering and applications of microbes will also be welcome.

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  • Virus assembly and structure workshop

    Hall 8a12:00 - 17:12

    Close
    Virus assembly and structure workshop

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 12:00 - 17:12    Add to outlook

    Viral structural proteins are integral for both protection and transmission of the viral genome once it is released from an infected cell. This workshop will focus on the molecular mechanisms that are required for assembly and release of virus particles within an infected cell, through to the structural alterations that take place within the virus particle during maturation and the entry process. The workshop will also cover antiviral strategies aimed at inhibiting the assembly process.

    Click here to view the session detail
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  • Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Hall 912:00 - 17:00

    Close
    Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Room: Hall 9
    Time: 12:00 - 17:00    Add to outlook

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Click here to view the session detail
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Thursday 2 April: Morning
09:00
12:00
  • Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Hall 10a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Click here to view the session detail
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  • Virus assembly – Let’s get together and get out of here

    Hall 59:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Virus assembly – Let’s get together and get out of here

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Virus assembly is a complex, tightly regulated process that is essential for every virus. The symposium will cover the latest research in capsid assembly and structure, genome packaging, particle egress and maturation. Assembly of a range of different viruses will be covered including viruses that cause important medical diseases (HIV-1, Influenza, Picornaviruses and Herpesviruses), plant viruses (Cow Pea Mosaic virus), bacteriophage (phi29) and the giant Mimivirus.

    Click here to view the session detail
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  • The rhizobiome

    Hall 8a9:00 - 12:00

    Close
    The rhizobiome

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    The root and rhizosphere microbiome is the microbial community that populates the microenvironment within and surrounding plant roots. Recent advances in genomics, transcriptomics and imaging technologies are enabling important new insights into the composition of this community, but there are still important challenges to address in understanding of the interplay between plant roots, root exudates and microbes and their impact on agricultural productivity and ecosystem function.

    Click here to view the session detail
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  • Clostridia – The good, the bad and the beautiful

    Hall 69:00 - 12:00

    Close
    Clostridia – The good, the bad and the beautiful

    Room: Hall 6
    Time: 9:00 - 12:00    Add to outlook

    Clostridium is an extremely varied, ancient genus of bacteria, which thrived and evolved in an atmosphere very dissimilar to the oxygen-rich environment of our modern world. Clostridia are anaerobic endospore formers and many of the pathogenic species such as Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum, are familiar as a consequence of the diseases they cause. However, the vast majority of these species are benign and a number, including Clostridium acetobutylicum, have received increased attention due their capacity to generate commercially valuable commodities such as ethanol or butanol. This symposium will highlight some of the advances that have been made in our understanding of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic members of this genus and will additionally describe how Clostridia are being tested as novel therapeutics in the treatment of cancer or their products in the case of C. botulinum’s neurotoxin.

    Click here to view the session detail
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Afternoon
12:00
15:30
  • Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Hall 10a12:00 - 12:20

    Close
    Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Room: Hall 10a
    Time: 12:00 - 12:20    Add to outlook

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Virus assembly – Let’s get together and get out of here

    Hall 512:00 - 15:00

    Close
    Virus assembly – Let’s get together and get out of here

    Room: Hall 5
    Time: 12:00 - 15:00    Add to outlook

    Virus assembly is a complex, tightly regulated process that is essential for every virus. The symposium will cover the latest research in capsid assembly and structure, genome packaging, particle egress and maturation. Assembly of a range of different viruses will be covered including viruses that cause important medical diseases (HIV-1, Influenza, Picornaviruses and Herpesviruses), plant viruses (Cow Pea Mosaic virus), bacteriophage (phi29) and the giant Mimivirus.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • The rhizobiome

    Hall 8a12:00 - 15:30

    Close
    The rhizobiome

    Room: Hall 8a
    Time: 12:00 - 15:30    Add to outlook

    The root and rhizosphere microbiome is the microbial community that populates the microenvironment within and surrounding plant roots. Recent advances in genomics, transcriptomics and imaging technologies are enabling important new insights into the composition of this community, but there are still important challenges to address in understanding of the interplay between plant roots, root exudates and microbes and their impact on agricultural productivity and ecosystem function.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook
  • Clostridia – The good, the bad and the beautiful

    Hall 612:00 - 15:30

    Close
    Clostridia – The good, the bad and the beautiful

    Room: Hall 6
    Time: 12:00 - 15:30    Add to outlook

    Clostridium is an extremely varied, ancient genus of bacteria, which thrived and evolved in an atmosphere very dissimilar to the oxygen-rich environment of our modern world. Clostridia are anaerobic endospore formers and many of the pathogenic species such as Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum, are familiar as a consequence of the diseases they cause. However, the vast majority of these species are benign and a number, including Clostridium acetobutylicum, have received increased attention due their capacity to generate commercially valuable commodities such as ethanol or butanol. This symposium will highlight some of the advances that have been made in our understanding of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic members of this genus and will additionally describe how Clostridia are being tested as novel therapeutics in the treatment of cancer or their products in the case of C. botulinum’s neurotoxin.

    Click here to view the session detail
    Add the entire subject to outlook

Other events

Sunday 29 March
  • Networking event

    ICC Birmingham, 18:00 - 20:00
    This preconference workshop is aimed at postgraduates and postdocs who are new to conferences or who want some tips on making new connections. The workshop includes activities to hone your networking skills and enhance your conference experience as well as providing a chance to meet fellow delegates in advance of the conference. There will be an opportunity to meet senior scientists from a range of backgrounds and discuss informal mentoring.

    Dinner will be provided. Pre-booking is required via conference registration.

Monday 30 March
  • Job Shop

    Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham,
    Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

  • Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again

    Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)
    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 12:10 - 13:00

  • Small World Initiative

    Hall 3, ICC Birmingham, 15:30 - 16:00
    The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

    It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

    If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

  • Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology

    Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)
    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 17:35 - 18:00

  • Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever

    Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA
    Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham, 18:45 - 19:30
    Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.

Tuesday 31 March
  • Job Shop

    Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham,
    Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

  • Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics

    David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)
    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 12:10 - 13:00

  • Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?

    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 15:30 - 17:00
    The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

    It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

  • Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus

    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 17:35 - 18:15
    In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

  • An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe

    Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe
    Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham, 17:35 - 18:15
    This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

    Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.

  • New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics

    Hall 3, ICC Birmingham, 18:30 - 19:00
    The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

    This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

  • Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth

    Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA
    Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham, 18:45 - 19:30
    Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.

Wednesday 01 April
  • Job Shop

    Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham,
    Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

  • Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?

    Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)
    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 12:10 - 13:00

  • Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit

    George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)
    Hall 1, ICC Birmingham, 17:35 - 18:00
    The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.

  • Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed

    Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA
    Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham, 18:45 - 19:30
    Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.

Thursday 02 April
  • Job Shop

    Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham,
    Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

Conference Session

  1. Association of Applied Biologists: Advances in plant virology

    Organiser Association of Applied Biologists

    The programme for this conference will be open to any topics or areas within basic or applied plant virology, will include all current areas of interest to Plant Virologists and will consist of presentations by invited speakers as well as offered papers by conference delegates. We welcome submissions from established researchers, post-docs and students. The meeting will include the student competitions as outlined below. Invited speakers include: Neil Boonham, The Food and Environment Agency, UK; Manfred Heinlein, French National Centre for Scientific Research (CNRS); Marilyn Roossinck, Penn State University, USA.

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    3. 14:00

      Mechanisms involved in TMV movement
      Hall 10a
      Manfred Heinlein (Institut de Biologie Moléculaire des Plants du CNRS, France)

    4. 14:40

      Little cherry virus in Belgium: a new or old threat to our cherry fruit sector
      Kris de Jonghe (Institute for Agricultural and Fisheries Research Plant Sciences Unit, Belgium)

    5. 15:10
    6. 15:25
    7. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    8. 16:00

      Spatio temporal analyses of lesions in compatible and incompatible potato - potato virus Y interaction
      Marusa Pompe-Novak (National Institute of Biology, Department of Biotechnology and Systems Biology, Slovenia)

    9. 16:15
    10. 16:30

      Transcriptome analysis of wild-type and RDR1-silenced tobacco infected with PVY
      Peter Palukaitis (Seoul Women's University, South Korea)

    11. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    12. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    13. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    14. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      The role of the viral polymerase in fidelity and replication
      Hall 10a
      Marilyn Roossink and Justin Pita (The Pennsylvania State University, USA)

    3. 09:40
    4. 10:00
    5. 10:20

      A review of what is known about viruses of trees, focusing on the UK
      Laura Flint (The Food and Environment Agency, UK)

    6. 10:40
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:25

      Analysis of the movement protein coding region of Cherry leaf roll virus
      Susanne von Bargen (Humboldt University, Germany)

    9. 11:40

      The role of CaMV TAV in suppression of cellular mRNA decay
      Nina Lukhovitskaya (Institut de Biologie Molécularie des Plantes du CNRS, Université de Strasbourg, France)

    10. 11:55

      TBC
      Wendy Monger (Science and Advice for Scottish Agriculture, UK)

    11. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    12. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    13. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

    Thursday 2 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      TBC
      Hall 10a
      Neil Boonham (The Food and Environment Agency, UK)

    3. 09:40

      Cucumber mosaic virus modifies plant-aphid interactions in tobacco
      Trisna Tungadi (University of Cambridge, UK)

    4. 10:00
    5. 10:20

      Studies on infection of potato by TRV
      Stuart MacFarlane (The James Hutton Institute, UK)

    6. 10:40
    7. 11:10

      Current status of Cassava brown streak disease?
      Maruthi Gowda (University of Greenwich, UK)

    8. 11:30

      TBC

    9. 11:50

      TBC

    10. 12:10
  2. Natural and unnatural virus evolution

    Organiser Janet Daly (University of Nottingham, UK), Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK)

    This symposium will delve into the evolution of human, animal and plant viruses. As well as considering natural evolution, the impact of human intervention will be explored; to what extent do vaccination and antiviral treatment drive selection? Have we learnt any lessons about the injudicious use of antimicrobials? Genetic engineering (including ‘gain-of-function’ studies) can aid our understanding of what makes viruses tick, but should studies that generate potentially dangerous viruses be censored – or not conducted in the first place? This and who should decide (science or society?) will be debated.

    Monday 30 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Adrian Fox (FERA, UK) and Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK)

      Hall 1

    3. 09:00

      Can viruses be essential for life? A virus role in evolution
      Luis Villarreal (University of California, USA)

    4. 09:30
    5. 10:00
    6. 10:15

      Offered paper - Quantifying the within-host evolution of influenza virus
      Chris Illingworth (University of Cambridge, UK)

    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00

      What does virus ecology tell us about the evolution of plant and fungal viruses?
      Marilyn Roossinck (The Pennsylvania State University, USA)

    9. 11:30
    10. 11:45

      Offered paper - Motif mimicry and the evolution of host-virus interactions
      Tzachi Hagai (EMBL - European Bioinformatics Institute, UK)

    11. 12:10

      Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)

    12. 13:00
    13. Chair Janet Daly (University of Nottingham, UK) and Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK)

    14. 14:00
    15. 14:30

      Human Cytomegalovirus: A quasispecies DNA virus?
      Timothy Kowalik (University of Massachussetts, USA)

    16. 15:00
    17. 15:30
    18. 15:30

      Small World Initiative
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

      It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

      If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

    19. 16:00
    20. 16:15
    21. 16:30

      Evolution towards viral genome segmentation
      Celia Perales (Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Spain)

    22. 17:00
    23. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)

    24. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Janet Daly (University of Nottingham, UK) and Adrian Fox (FERA, UK)

      Hall 1

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:15
    5. 09:30

      Evolution of Hepatitis B Virus genome during antiviral therapy
      Fabien Zoulim (Lyon University, France)

    6. 10:00
    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00
    9. 11:30
    10. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. Chair Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK) and Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK)

    13. 14:00

      Synthetic Virology to Elucidate Emerging Viruses and Improve Vaccines
      David Wentworth (Centers for Disease Control, USA)

    14. 14:30

      Designing new vaccines to safeguard global poliovirus eradication
      Andrew Macadam (National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, UK)

    15. 15:00
    16. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    17. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    18. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    19. 18:15
    20. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    21. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

  3. Antimicrobial resistance

    Organiser Alison Mather (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK), Nicholas Thomson (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK)

    Antimicrobial resistant bacterial infections represent one of the most serious threats facing our world today. This symposium will explore various aspects of antimicrobial resistance (AMR), including its origins, reservoirs, economics and ecology, and also novel ways in which it might be combatted.

    Monday 30 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00
    3. 09:30
    4. 10:00
    5. 10:15
    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      Salmonella persisters in the host
      Sophie Helaine (Imperial College London, UK)

    8. 11:30

      A population genomics view of pneumococcal antimicrobial resistance
      Stephen Bentley (Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute, UK)

    9. 12:10

      Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. 14:00
    12. 14:30
    13. 14:45
    14. 15:00

      Small World Initiative
      Paul Hoskisson (University of Strathclyde, UK)

    15. 15:15

      Longitude Prize
      Tamar Gosh (NESTA, UK) and Laura Piddock (University of Birmingham, UK)

    16. 15:30
    17. 15:30

      Small World Initiative
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

      It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

      If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

    18. 16:00

      Measuring resistance: Importance of harmonisation in surveillance
      Hajo Grundmann (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

    19. 16:30

      Review on antimicrobial resistance: An economist's perspective
      Anthony McDonnell (Review on Antimicrobial Resistance, UK)

    20. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)

    21. 18:15
    22. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      Emergence of AMR in human and animal populations of Staphylococcus aureus
      Hall 5
      Ross Fitzgerald (The Roslin Institute, University of Edinburgh, UK)

    3. 09:30

      Reservoirs and transmission of resistance in animals
      Nicola Williams (University of Liverpool, UK)

    4. 10:15
    5. 10:15
    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      Klebsiella pneumoniae population genomics and antimicrobial resistance
      Kathryn Holt (University of Melbourne, Australia)

    8. 11:30

      Emergence of resistance in tuberculosis: Clinical and in vitro studies
      Stephen Gillespie (University of St Andrews)

    9. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. 14:00

      The human gut as reservoir for antibiotic resistance genes and opportunistic pathogens
      Willem van Schaik (University Medical Center Utrecht, Netherlands)

    12. 14:30
    13. 15:00
    14. 15:15
    15. 15:30
    16. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    17. 16:00

      Real-time transfer of resistance in the host
      Jodi Lindsay (St George's, University of London, UK)

    18. 16:30
    19. 17:00
    20. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    21. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    22. 18:15
    23. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    24. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

  4. Sensory perception in microbes: coping with change

    Organiser Conor O’Byrne (NUI Galway, Ireland), Peter Lund (University of Birmingham, UK)

    While very significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding how microbes respond to changes in their environment, in terms of gene expression and metabolism, much less is known about how environmental cues are detected in the first instance. This meeting aims to bring together some exciting recent advances in our understanding of the mechanisms that allow microbes to perceive their environments and how these sensory signals are integrated into pathways that generate appropriate outputs.

    Monday 30 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)

    3. 14:00

      The EvgS sensor kinase: E. coli's pH meter
      Hall 8a
      Peter Lund (University of Birmingham, UK)

    4. 14:30
    5. 15:00

      Aerobic and anaerobic trimethylamine oxide signalling in E. coli
      Mark Goulian (University of Pennsylvania, USA)

    6. 15:30
    7. 15:30

      Small World Initiative
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

      It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

      If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

    8. 16:00

      Stress sensing in the intracellular pathogen Listeria monocytogenes
      Jörgen Johansson (Umeå University, Sweden)

    9. 16:30
    10. 16:45
    11. 17:00
    12. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)

    13. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      The role of lipids in triggering bacterial pressure sensing channels
      Hall 8a
      Jim Naismith (University of St Andrews, UK)

    3. 09:30

      Bacterial cell volume regulation and traffic & translocation in crowded environments
      Bert Poolman (University of Groningen, The Netherlands)

    4. 10:00

      The exploration of surfaces by fungal hyphae
      Alex Brand (University of Aberdeen, UK)

    5. 10:30
    6. 11:00
    7. 11:15
    8. 11:30

      Signal Sensing in a Bacterial Pathogen
      Eduardo Groisman (Yale University, USA)

    9. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. 14:00

      Enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) sings: pour some sugar on me
      Vanessa Sperandio (University of Texas, US)

    12. 14:30
    13. 15:00
    14. 15:15
    15. 15:30
    16. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    17. 16:00
    18. 16:30
    19. 17:00

      Sensory input into c-di-GMP control of E. coli biofilm formation
      Regine Hengge (Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, Germany)

    20. 17:30
    21. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    22. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    23. 18:15
    24. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    25. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

  5. The building blocks of microbial evolution

    Organiser Derek Pickard (Sanger Institute, UK), Richard McCulloch (University of Glasgow, UK), Thorsten Allers (University of Nottingham, UK)

    Microbial evolution is key to understanding many aspects of biology including ecology, life at extremes of temperature, pressure and aridity as well as pathogenicity. With the latter in mind, it was important to develop the symposium to illustrate that these interactions are as old as life itself, though at a more basal level! This symposium will bring together many leading microbiologists working in a diverse range of specialties related to early microbial evolution that would be of interest to many delegates. The intended audience will be wide-ranging and include many who have an interest in the diverse aspects of paleobiology, ecology as well as pathogenicity.

    Monday 30 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Derek Pickard

      Hall 8b

    3. 09:00

      Anoxygenic photosynthesis and the archaean world
      John F. Allen (Queen Mary University of London, UK)

    4. Chair Derek Pickard

    5. 09:30
    6. Chair Derek Pickard

    7. 10:00

      The genome of Bacillus coahuilensis and the unique Cuatro Cienegas basin ecosystem
      Valeria Souza (Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Mexico)

    8. 10:30
    9. Chair Thorsten Allers

    10. 11:00
    11. Chair Thorsten Allers

    12. 11:30

      Phylogenomics and large-scale evolution of micro-organisms
      Simonetta Gribaldo (Institute Pasteur, France)

    13. 12:10

      Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)

    14. 13:00
    15. Chair Thorsten Allers

    16. 14:00

      Archaea viruses; origins and mysteries!
      David Prangishvili (Institute Pasteur, France)

    17. Chair Thorsten Allers

    18. 14:30

      The rapidly expanding universe of giant viruses
      Chantel Abergel (CNRS Aix-Marseille Université, France)

    19. Chair William Schopf

    20. 15:00

      Offered paper - Heterocyst-forming cyanobacteria: a unique case of multicellularity
      Enrique Flores ( Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Spain)

    21. Chair William Schopf

    22. 15:15
    23. 15:30
    24. 15:30

      Small World Initiative
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

      It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

      If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

    25. Chair William Schopf/Derek Pickard

    26. 16:00

      Evolution of type III and type VI secretion systems in bacteria
      Mark Pallen (University of Warwick, UK)

    27. Chair William Schopf/Derek Pickard

    28. 16:30
    29. Chair William Schopf/Derek Pickard

    30. 17:00
    31. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)

    32. 18:15
    33. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Richard McCulloch

      Hall 8b

    3. 09:00

      Endosymbiosis and the origins of eukaryotes
      William F. Martin (Heinrich-Heine-Universität, Germany)

    4. Chair Richard McCulloch

    5. 09:30

      A divergent nuclear lamina in typanosomes
      Mark Field (University of Dundee, UK)

    6. Chair Richard McCulloch

    7. 10:00

      The evolution of the eukaryotic cytoskeleton
      Bill Wickstead (University of Nottingham, UK)

    8. 10:30
    9. Chair Mark Field

    10. 11:00

      Origins of eukaryotic sexual reproduction
      Ursula Goodenough (Washington University, USA)

    11. 11:30
    12. 11:45
    13. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    14. 13:00
    15. Chair Richard McCulloch

    16. 14:00
    17. 14:30
    18. Chair Richard McCulloch

    19. 15:00

      Becoming parasitic: the several stages of trypanosomatid evolution
      Andrew Jackson (University of Liverpool, UK)

    20. 15:30
    21. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    22. Chair Derek Pickard

    23. 16:00
    24. Chair Derek Pickard

    25. 16:30
    26. Chair Derek Pickard

    27. 17:00
    28. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    29. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    30. 18:15
    31. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    32. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

  6. Microbiome in health and disease

    Organiser Julian Marchesi (University of Cardiff, UK), Sandra Macfarlane (University of Dundee, UK)

    Microbiome in Health and Disease: For this session we have invited world leading scientists in the area to provide insight into how the microbiome interacts with the host and promotes/maintains health and its role in disease. This is a rapidly growing field and the speakers will provide us with current information on various microbiomes in the human body.

    Monday 30 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Sandra Macfarlane (University of Dundee, UK)

      Hall 11a

    3. 09:00

      The human microbiome in health and disease
      Julian R. Marchesi (Cardiff University, UK)

    4. 09:30

      Diabetes, obesity and gut microbiota
      Patrice Cani (University of Louvain, Belgium)

    5. 10:00
    6. 10:15
    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00

      Modulation of host microbiome by transplantation
      Emma Allen-Vercoe (University of Guelph, Canada)

    9. 11:30
    10. 12:10

      Fleming Prize Lecture – Rapid microbial evolution: From the lab to the clinic and back again
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Michael Brockhurst (University of York, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. Chair Julian Marchesi (University of Cardiff, UK)

    13. 14:00

      The genomics of breast milk's influence on the developing infant microbiome
      David Sela (University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA)

    14. 14:30

      The gut microbiota as an emerging target for a healthy ageing
      Patrizia Brigidi (University of Bologna, Italy)

    15. 15:00
    16. 15:15
    17. 15:30
    18. 15:30

      Small World Initiative
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Small World Initiative is being supported in the UK and Ireland by the Microbiology Society and will give the general public, students and educators in the UK and Ireland the opportunity to work with scientists as part of a global initiative to discover new antibiotics from soil bacteria.

      It will initially run in undergraduate courses at 10 universities and in five school partnerships. A series of “pop-up” events will also take place at locations across the UK and Ireland, giving the public the opportunity to submit their soil samples, which they can then make observations and comment on as they are tracked online through the analysis process.

      If you would like to run the Initiative in your university, form a partnership with a school or if you are interested in applying for the PhD then this session will be of interest. If you are unable to attend the session, please attend the Society’s stand for more information.

    19. 16:00

      Metabolomic characterisation of the gut microbiome and disease
      Elaine Holmes (Imperial College, London)

    20. 16:30

      Diet and the gut microbiome
      Yolanda Sanz (National Research Council, Spain)

    21. 17:00

      Modelling Clostridium difficile Infection
      Caroline Chilton (University of Leeds, UK)

    22. 17:35

      Peter Wildy Prize Lecture – Exploring The Invisible: adventures in art and microbiology
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Simon Park (University of Surrey, UK)

    23. 18:15
    24. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Ben Tenoever
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Ben Tenoever but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Ben Tenoever, Mount Sinai Icahn School of Medicine, New York, USA

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Julian Marchesi (University of Cardiff, UK)

      Hall 11a

    3. 09:00

      Microbes and the brain-gut axis
      Ted Dinan (University College Cork, Ireland)

    4. 09:30

      Lung and normal airway microbiota and implications for cystic fibrosis
      Michael Tunney (Queen's University Belfast, UK)

    5. 10:00

      The oral microbiome in health and disease
      Wiliam Wade (Barts and the London School of Medicine and Dentistry, UK)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00

      Molecular Insights into Bacterial Vaginosis (BV) and the Vaginal Microbiota
      David Fredricks (Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Centre, University of Washington, USA)

    8. 11:30
    9. 11:45
    10. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    11. 13:00
    12. Chair Sandra Macfarlane (University of Dundee, UK)

    13. 14:00

      Topical probiotics as novel treatments for skin in health and disease
      Cath O’Neil (University of Manchester, UK)

    14. 14:30
    15. 15:00

      Therapeutic manipulation of microbial biofilms
      Andrew McBain (University of Manchester, UK)

    16. 15:30
    17. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    18. 16:00
    19. 16:15
    20. 16:30
    21. 17:00
    22. 17:30
    23. 17:35
    24. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    25. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    26. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    27. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

  7. Microbial archaeology

    Organiser Justin Pachebat (Aberystwyth University, UK), Mick Tuite (University of Kent, UK)

    Over the past 10 years the development of whole genome amplification, next generation sequencing and and mass-spectrophotometry techniques has allowed researchers to deep sequence ancient DNA, and analyse lipds and poteins in archeological samples. This session will illustrate how researchers are taking advantage of this capability to study pathogens (i.e. Y. pestis, TB, leprosy, potato blight) associated with past infections of animals, humans and plants. The application of metagenomic approaches to study ancient microbiomes will be illustrated by a talk on the ancient oral microbiome.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      Genomic insights into 170 years of Phytophthora infestans evolution
      Hall 7
      Thomas Gilbert (University of Copenhagen, Denmark)

    3. 09:30
    4. 10:00

      Ancient Pathogen Genomics: What we learn from historic epidemics
      Johannes Krause (University of Tübingen, Germany)

    5. 10:30
    6. 11:00
    7. 11:30
    8. 11:45
    9. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    10. 13:00
    11. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    12. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  8. Microbes in space

    Organiser Peter W. Taylor (University College London, UK)

    The vast and hostile environment of outer space represents a major challenge to all forms of life; exposure to microgravity, extremes of temperature, galactic cosmic rays and solar energetic particles within a vacuum is guaranteed. However, experiments performed aboard Earth-orbiting spacecraft indicate that some microorganisms are able to survive outside these platforms for lengthy periods of time and there is compelling evidence that many microbes respond to the unique environment associated with spaceflight in ways that shed light on their adaptive behaviour. Currently, the primary platform for conducting research into the response of microbes to the space environment is the International Space Station, a facility supporting a number of well-equipped laboratories that has been continuously manned and able to conduct scientific experiments since 2000. Following a UK governmental decision in November 2012 to subscribe to the European Space Agency’s Programme for Life and Physical Sciences, it was recently announced that Major Tim Peake, the first Briton to be selected as an astronaut by ESA, will spend time on the ISS in late 2015. He will undertake scientific research with the potential to include microbiological experiments on his agenda. The session will present Major Peake’s plans and review the current state of knowledge of the behaviour of microbes in real and simulated space environments.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. 13:50

      Extremes of life on Earth and beyond
      Hall 11b
      Charles Cockell (University of Edinburgh, UK)

    4. 14:20

      Responses of micro-organisms to radiation in space
      Gerda Horneck (DLR German Aerospace Center, Germany)

    5. 14:50
    6. 15:20
    7. 15:50

      Influence of gravity on microbiological processes
      David Klaus (University of Colorado, USA)

    8. 16:20
    9. 16:50
    10. 17:30
    11. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    12. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  9. Virus assembly – Let’s get together and get out of here

    Organiser Catherine Adamson (University of St. Andrews, UK), Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK), Nicola Stonehouse (University of Leeds, UK)

    Virus assembly is a complex, tightly regulated process that is essential for every virus. The symposium will cover the latest research in capsid assembly and structure, genome packaging, particle egress and maturation. Assembly of a range of different viruses will be covered including viruses that cause important medical diseases (HIV-1, Influenza, Picornaviruses and Herpesviruses), plant viruses (Cow Pea Mosaic virus), bacteriophage (phi29) and the giant Mimivirus.

    Thursday 2 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Catherine Adamson (University of St Andrews, UK) and Nicola Stonehouse (University of Leeds, UK)

      Hall 5

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:30
    5. 10:00
    6. 10:30
    7. Chair Catherine Adamson (University of St Andrews, UK) and Nicola Stonehouse (University of Leeds, UK)

    8. 11:00

      Cutting to the Chase: Limited Proteolysis and Allosteric Transitions in Virus Maturation
      Alasdair Steven (Laboratory of Structural Biology Research, USA)

    9. 11:30
    10. 12:00
    11. 13:00

      The DNA Packaging Motor of Bacteriophage phi29
      Shelly Grimes (University of Minnesota, USA)

    12. 13:30
    13. 14:00
    14. 14:30

      Replication Cycle and Assembly of the Giant Mimivirus
      Abraham Minsky (The Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel)  

    15. 15:00
  10. Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes

    Organiser Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK), Campbell Gourlay (University of Kent, UK)

    Over the past 1 to 2 billion years of evolution, microbial eukaryotes have invaded a wide spectrum of habitats on our planet, and as a result we are observing a broad variety of organisms with unique adaptations on their external and internal morphology including their organelles. For example, a lot of these unicellular organisms have adapted to the low oxygen environments by the loss of aerobic respiration and by modifying their mitochondria into one of a number of types of mitochondrion-related organelles (MROs), including the hydrogen producing “hydrogenosomes” and or the entirely remnant mitochondria so-called “mitosomes”. Functions that have been considered a prerequisite for the existence of canonical mitochondria or the cell itself such as oxidative phosphorylation, heme and phospholipids biosynthesis, calcium homeostasis, programmed cell death and iron-sulphur cluster assembly, are currently eliminated one-by-one in a range of eukaryotic cells and more questions are arising on the roles of mitochondria in the different organisms and subsequently the raison d’etre of the organelle itself. Despite this diversification, all known eukaryotes possess an organelle of mitochondrial origin, suggesting the origin of mitochondria to the last eukaryotic common ancestor.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Anastasios Tsaousis (University of Kent, UK) and Campbell Gourlay (University of Kent, UK)

      Hall 8b

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:15
    5. 09:30

      Mitochondria and related organelles in microbial eukaryotes
      Mark van der Giezen (University of Exeter, UK)

    6. 10:00

      Comparing complexity of aerobic mitochondria in unicellular and multicellular organisms
      Julius Lukes (University of South Bohemia in Ceske Budejovice, Czech Republic)

    7. 10:30
    8. 11:00

      The pre-endosymbiont hypothesis: A new look at the origin of mitochondria
      Michael W. Gray (Dalhousie University, Canada)

    9. 11:30

      Offered paper - Mitochondrial genome architecture of a newly identified diplonemid Hemistasia phaeocysticola
      Akinori Yabuki (Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Japan)

    10. 11:45
    11. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    12. 13:00
    13. 14:00
    14. 14:30

      Mitochondrial carriers of man, fungi and parasites
      Edmund Kunji (MRC, Mitochondrial Biology Unit, UK)

    15. 15:00
    16. 15:30
    17. 16:00

      Offered paper - Regulation of mitochondria by proteolysis
      Mehak Rafiq (University of Greenwich, UK)

    18. 16:15

      Drug targets in mitochondria of malaria parasites, implications for resistance
      Geoff McFadden (University of Melbourne, Australia)

    19. 16:45
    20. 17:00
    21. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    22. 18:15
    23. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  11. The rhizobiome

    Organiser Gail Preston (University of Oxford, UK), Philip Poole (University of Oxford, UK)

    The root and rhizosphere microbiome is the microbial community that populates the microenvironment within and surrounding plant roots. Recent advances in genomics, transcriptomics and imaging technologies are enabling important new insights into the composition of this community, but there are still important challenges to address in understanding of the interplay between plant roots, root exudates and microbes and their impact on agricultural productivity and ecosystem function.

    Thursday 2 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      Quantitative divergence of the bacterial root microbiota in Arabidopsis thaliana relatives
      Hall 8a
      Paul Schultze-Lefert (Max Planck Institute for Plant Breeding Research, Germany)

    3. 09:30
    4. 10:00
    5. 10:30
    6. 11:00
    7. 11:30
    8. 12:00
    9. 12:30
    10. 13:30

      The rhizosphere microbiome and plant health
      Peter Bakker (Utrecht University, The Netherlands)

    11. 14:00

      Back to the Roots: functions and metabolic potential of the rhizosphere microbiome
      Jos Raijmaker (Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Netherlands)

    12. 14:30
    13. 15:00

      The impact of pathogens and biocontrol agents on the plant microbiome
      Gabriele Berg (Graz University of Technology, Austria)

  12. Clostridia – The good, the bad and the beautiful

    Organiser Gillian Douce (University of Glasgow, UK), Sarah Kuehne (University of Nottingham, UK)

    Clostridium is an extremely varied, ancient genus of bacteria, which thrived and evolved in an atmosphere very dissimilar to the oxygen-rich environment of our modern world. Clostridia are anaerobic endospore formers and many of the pathogenic species such as Clostridium difficile, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum, are familiar as a consequence of the diseases they cause. However, the vast majority of these species are benign and a number, including Clostridium acetobutylicum, have received increased attention due their capacity to generate commercially valuable commodities such as ethanol or butanol. This symposium will highlight some of the advances that have been made in our understanding of both pathogenic and non-pathogenic members of this genus and will additionally describe how Clostridia are being tested as novel therapeutics in the treatment of cancer or their products in the case of C. botulinum’s neurotoxin.

    Thursday 2 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Gill Douce and Sarah Keuhne

      Hall 6

    3. 09:00

      Re-Commercialisation of Industrial Solvent Production
      Edward Green (Green Biologic Ltd, UK)

    4. 09:30
    5. 10:00

      Cellulosomes: efficient lignocellulose degrading nanomachines
      Harry Gilbert (University of Newcastle, UK)

    6. 10:30
    7. 11:00
    8. 11:30

      The Changing Treatment of C. difficile infection
      Chris Longshaw (Astellas, UK)

    9. 11:45
    10. 12:45
    11. 13:15
    12. 13:45
    13. 14:15
    14. 14:30
    15. 15:00

      Clostridia and cancer therapy
      Nigel Minton (The University of Nottingham, UK)

  13. Virus workshop: Gene expression and replication

    Organiser Michelle West (University of Sussex, UK), Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK)

    This workshop will focus on the regulation of viral and host gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level by virally-encoded factors and address how viruses control the replication of their genomes.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Michelle West (University of Sussex, UK)

      Hall 1

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24

      Offered paper - Lytic replication of Epstein-Barr Virus
      Christopher Traylen (University of Sussex, UK)

    6. 09:36
    7. 09:48
    8. 10:00
    9. 10:12
    10. 10:24
    11. 11:00
    12. 11:12
    13. 11:24
    14. 11:36
    15. 11:48
    16. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    17. 13:00
    18. Chair Joanna Parish (University of Birmingham, UK)

    19. 14:00
    20. 14:12
    21. 14:24
    22. 14:36
    23. 14:48
    24. 15:00
    25. 15:12
    26. 15:24
    27. 16:00
    28. 16:12
    29. 16:24
    30. 16:36
    31. 16:48
    32. 17:00
    33. 17:12
    34. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    35. 18:15
    36. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  14. Virus workshop: Pathogenesis

    Organiser Janet Daly (University of Nottingham, UK)

    Understanding disease development mechanistically at the cellular, genetic and whole organism level is a vital element in the development of novel therapeutic strategies such as vaccines and small molecule inhibitors. To this end, this workshop will serve as a forum for the presentation of new and exciting data pertaining to all aspects of the pathogenesis of virus infection.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Janet Daly (University of Nottingham, UK) and James Stewart (University of Liverpool, UK)

      Hall 5

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24
    6. 09:36

      Offered paper - Identification of a human neuronal receptor for measles virus
      Haniah Abdullah (Queen’s University Belfast, UK)

    7. 09:48
    8. 10:00
    9. 10:12
    10. 10:24
    11. 11:00
    12. 11:12
    13. 11:24
    14. 11:36
    15. 11:48
    16. 12:00
    17. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    18. 13:00
    19. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    20. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  15. Virus workshop: Antivirals and vaccines

    Organiser Stephen Griffin (University of Leeds, UK), Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK)

    The availability of antiviral small molecules and vaccines has historically lagged behind those targeting bacteria. Accordingly, the public health issues represented by both common and emerging virus infections are considerable, with effective treatments lacking in many cases. Research aimed at translating laboratory findings into either novel or improved anti-viral strategies is therefore a priority. This workshop will highlight ongoing research into burgeoning therapies for important human and animal viral pathogens, encompassing all stages of therapeutic development ranging from the test tube to in vivo studies.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Stephen Griffin (University of Leeds, UK) and Andrew Macadam (National Institute for Biological Standards and Control, UK)

      Hall 8a

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24
    6. 09:36
    7. 09:48
    8. 10:00
    9. 10:12
    10. 11:00
    11. 11:12
    12. 11:24
    13. 11:36
    14. 11:48
    15. 12:00
    16. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    17. 13:00
    18. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    19. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  16. Virus workshop: Evolution and virus populations

    Organiser Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK), Erica Bickerton (The Pirbright Institute, UK)

    Virus evolution can affect important characteristics such as replication host range, tropism, and pathogenesis. On the other hand, there are constraints imposed by nucleotide sequences and proteins they encode. This workshop will address questions related to the topics above.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Alain Kohl (University of Glasgow, UK) and Erica Bickerton (The Pirbright Institute, UK)

      Hall 6

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24
    6. 09:36
    7. 09:48
    8. 10:00

      Offered paper - Phylogenetic studies of orthobunyaviruses
      Gillian Slack (MRC - University of Glasgow, UK)

    9. 10:12
    10. 10:24
    11. 11:00
    12. 11:12
    13. 11:24
    14. 11:36
    15. 11:48
    16. 12:00
    17. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    18. 13:00
    19. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    20. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  17. Virus workshop: Innate immunity

    Organiser Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK), Andrew Macdonald (University of Leeds, UK)

    The innate immune system represents the first line of defence of all living organisms against infection, and in recent years our knowledge of the battle between viruses and innate immunity has increased substantially. This workshop will highlight novel host defence mechanisms and uncover a myriad of virus evasion strategies.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. Chair Wendy Barclay (Imperial College London, UK)

      Hall 5

    4. 14:00
    5. 14:12
    6. 14:24
    7. 14:36
    8. 14:48
    9. 15:00
    10. 15:12
    11. 15:24
    12. Chair Andrew Macdonald (University of Leeds, UK)

    13. 16:00
    14. 16:12
    15. 16:24

      Offered paper - XRN1 is a Species-Specific Virus Restriction Factor in Yeast
      Paul Rowley (The University of Texas at Austin, USA)

    16. 16:36
    17. 16:48
    18. 17:00
    19. 17:12
    20. 17:25
    21. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    22. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  18. Virus workshop: Plant virology

    Organiser Adrian Fox (FERA, UK)

    The is a joint workshop co-hosted by the Microbiology Society Virus Division and the Association of Applied Biologists Plant Virology Group. The workshop will cover all aspects of applied plant virology from academic and translational research. The topics covered will include novel virus discovery, diagnostics, epidemiology, virus evolution, and plant-virus interactions.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. 14:00
    4. 14:12
    5. 14:24
    6. 14:36
    7. 14:48
    8. 15:00
    9. 15:30
    10. 15:42

      Can root colonisation by arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi alter plant reaction to an airborne virus?
      Gian Paolo Accotto (Institute for Sustainable Plant Protection, Italy)

    11. 15:54
    12. 16:06

      P15: new insights into viral suppression of RNA silencing
      Marco Incarborne (Institut de Biologie Moleculaire des Plants, France)

    13. 16:18

      Detection and phylogenetic relationship of papaya ringspot virus-p in Pakistan
      Saadia Naseem (Department of Biosciences, Pakistan)

    14. 16:30
    15. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    16. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  19. Virus workshop: Clinical virology

    Organiser Mirren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK), Kevin Brown (Public Health England, UK)

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Mirren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK)

      Hall 9

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:12
    5. 09:24
    6. 09:36
    7. 09:48
    8. 10:00
    9. 10:12
    10. 10:24
    11. 11:00
    12. 11:12
    13. 11:24
    14. 11:36

      Offered paper - Serology support for EVD convalescent plasma studies
      Steve Dicks (University College London/Public Health England/NHS Blood and Transplant, UK)

    15. 11:48

      Offered paper - Increased detection of Seoul Hantavirus in Europe
      Lorraine McElhinney (Animal and Plant Health Agency, UK)

    16. 12:00
    17. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    18. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    19. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  20. Prokaryotic microbial infection forum

    Organiser Petra Oyston, Gill Douce (University of Glasgow, UK), Jennifer Mitchell (University College Dublin, Ireland)

    Offered papers will be welcome in any area related to infections caused by prokaryotes of human, veterinary or botanical significance including epidemiology, diagnosis, identification, typing, pathogenesis, treatment, antimicrobial agents and resistance, prevention, virulence factors, host responses and immunity, transmission, and models of infection at the cell, tissue or whole organism level. Papers on interactions between non-pathogenic prokaryotes or indigenous microbiota and the host will also be welcome.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00

      TBC
      Hall 10b
      Chris Tang (University of Oxford, UK)

    3. 09:30
    4. 09:42
    5. 09:54
    6. 10:06
    7. 10:18
    8. 10:30
    9. 10:42
    10. 11:12
    11. 11:24
    12. 11:36
    13. 11:48
    14. 12:00
    15. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    16. 13:00
    17. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    18. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  21. Environmental and applied microbiology forum

    Organiser Geertje van Keulen (Swansea University, UK), Ryan Seipke (University of Leeds, UK)

    Offered papers are welcomed focusing on any area in microbial ecology, including (non-human) host-microbe communities and interactions, marine and freshwater microbiology, soil and geomicrobiology, and air-, cryo- and extremophile microbiology. Papers on microbe-mediated biodegradation and bioremediation will also be welcome.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. Chair Geertje van Keulen (Swansea University, UK) and Ryan Seipke (University of Leeds, UK)

      Hall 11a

    3. 09:00
    4. 09:30
    5. 09:42
    6. 09:54
    7. 10:06
    8. 10:18
    9. 10:30
    10. 11:00
    11. 11:12
    12. 11:24
    13. 11:36
    14. 11:48
    15. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    16. 13:00
    17. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    18. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  22. Prokaryotic genetics forum

    Organiser Alan McNally (Nottingham Trent University, UK), Lori Snyder (Kingston University, UK)

    Offered papers on all aspects of the genes and genomes of prokaryotes and their mobile elements will be considered, including their sequencing, transcription, translation, regulation, chromosome dynamics, gene transfer, population genetics and evolution, taxonomy and systematics, comparative genomics, metagenomics, bioinformatics, and synthetic biology.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. 14:00

      Bacterial protein glycosylation - never say never with bacteria
      Hall 11a
      Brendan Wren (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK)

    4. 14:30
    5. 14:45
    6. 15:00
    7. 15:15
    8. 15:30
    9. 16:00
    10. 16:15
    11. 16:30
    12. 16:45
    13. 17:00
    14. 17:35
    15. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    16. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  23. Prokaryotic cell biology forum

    Organiser Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK), Stephen Michell (University of Exeter, UK)

    This forum will consider work on all fundamental aspects of the physiology, biochemistry and structure of prokaryotic cells. This includes metabolism, synthesis and transport of macromolecules, membrane transport of ions and small molecules, the cell cycle, cell architecture, differentiation, sensing and cellular responses, signalling and communication, bioenergetics and the structure, function and mode of action of microbial factors. Papers on the engineering and applications of microbes will also be welcome.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. Chair Mark Webber (University of Birmingham, UK)

      Hall 10b

    4. 14:00

      Bacterial Cell Wall Architecture and Dynamics
      Simon Foster (University of Sheffield, UK)

    5. 14:30
    6. 14:45
    7. 15:00
    8. 15:15
    9. 15:30
    10. Chair Stephen Michell (University of Exeter, UK)

    11. 16:00
    12. 16:15
    13. 16:30
    14. 16:45
    15. 17:00
    16. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    17. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  24. Virus assembly and structure workshop

    Organiser Catherine Adamson (University of St. Andrews, UK)

    Viral structural proteins are integral for both protection and transmission of the viral genome once it is released from an infected cell. This workshop will focus on the molecular mechanisms that are required for assembly and release of virus particles within an infected cell, through to the structural alterations that take place within the virus particle during maturation and the entry process. The workshop will also cover antiviral strategies aimed at inhibiting the assembly process.

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    3. 14:00
    4. 14:12
    5. 14:24
    6. 14:36
    7. 14:48
    8. 15:00
    9. 15:12
    10. 15:24
    11. 16:00
    12. 16:12
    13. 16:24
    14. 16:36
    15. 16:48
    16. 17:00

      Kinetic Mass Spectrometry analysis protein composition of isolated Mimivirus factories
      Yael Fridmann-Sirkis (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel)

    17. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    18. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

  25. Clinical Virology Network Annual Meeting

    Organiser Mirren Iturriza-Gomara (University of Liverpool, UK), Kevin Brown (Public Health England, UK)

    This workshop will involve a range of clinical virology cases or short papers which relate to studies relevant to clinical virology network. Different aspects of clinical virology that will be covered include differential diagnosis of encephalitis, management of hepatitis, diversity of rotavirus sequences, and diagnosis of respiratory infections.

    Tuesday 31 March 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 12:10

      Microbiology Society 2015 Prize Medal – The small RNA link in antiviral defense and epigenetics
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      David Baulcombe (University of Cambridge, UK)

    3. 13:00
    4. 14:00
    5. 14:30

      Molecular diagnostics relevant to the diagnostic virology laboratory
      Melvyn Smith (King’s College Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, UK)

    6. 15:00
    7. 15:00
    8. 15:30

      Debate: Is it in the public interest to support gain of function experiments in the UK?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The recent controversy over so-called gain-of-function influenza viruses has sparked a lively debate between virologists and other scientists over the use and regulation of such experiments. Clearly this is a sensitive issue which is likely to touch many of those working in the virology field at some point in their careers, and is relevant to other fields of microbiology too. The issue remains unresolved and some concerns have been expressed that the same people continue to bring the same argument and the participation in the debate needs to be widened.

      It is important that the UK and the rest of Europe decide, independently of the USA, what is the correct course for this type of research in the UK. The Society is perhaps the single most important independent body that can give advice to government on this issue. Policy in this area should represent the views of the membership. Therefore, our debate this year will bring together scientists from both sides of the debate to discuss their thoughts and engage with the audience.

    9. 15:45

      Anti-viral treatment update and case histories
      Erasmus Swift (PHL Birmingham Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust, UK)

    10. 16:15
    11. 17:35

      Hot Topic Lecture: Ebola virus
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      In the Hot Topic session this year we will hear from two Ebola virus experts. Dr Ed Wright from the University of Westminster will give the background to the virus and the current situation. Dr Tim Brooks is the Head of the Rare and Imported Pathogens Laboratory, Public Health England at Porton Down and has been very much involved in the UK response during this outbreak. He will shed light on the current situation in West Africa.

    12. 17:35

      An Audience with Sir David Baulcombe
      Hall 7a, ICC Birmingham
      This year, the Society’s Prize Medal is awarded to Sir David Baulcombe, Royal Society Research Professor and Regius Professor of Botany at the University of Cambridge.

      Join us in this session, where Sir David talks about his research and career, with the Society’s Benjamin Thompson.


      Benjamin Thompson and Sir David Baulcombe

    13. 18:30

      New Journal Announcement: Microbial Genomics
      Hall 3, ICC Birmingham
      The Microbiology Society is pleased to announce the forthcoming launch of a new journal, Microbial Genomics. This fully open access, open data and peer-reviewed journal will publish original and high-profile research on archaea, bacteria, microbial eukaryotes and viruses.

      This announcement and Q&A session will provide the opportunity to learn more about the journal and meet some of the editorial board members. Please join us in supporting the Society in this exciting new venture. Submissions are now open and the journal will launch officially in July 2015. Please visit mgen.sgmjournals.org for further information.

    14. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Dave Wentworth
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Dave Wentworth but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Dave Wentworth, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Atlanta, USA

    Wednesday 1 April 2015
    1. Job Shop
      Level 4 Foyer, ICC Birmingham
      Throughout the conference, there is the opportunity for informal networking between potential applicants and those with positions available, to meet and discuss employment details.

    2. 09:00
    3. 12:10

      Marjory Stephenson Prize Lecture – What's the host and what's the microbe?
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      Robin Weiss (University College London, UK)

    4. 13:00
    5. 14:00

      HHV6-diagnosis and management
      Katherin Ward (University College London, UK)

    6. 14:30

      Enterovirus 68 – clinical presentations and surveillance
      Bert Nusters (Groningen University, Netherlands)

    7. 15:00
    8. 15:15
    9. 17:35

      Colworth Prize Lecture – Turning diseases to commodity: working on a plant virus for fun and profit
      Hall 1, ICC Birmingham
      The 2016 Colworth Prize will be awarded to Gurdyal ‘Del’ Besra, Bardrick Professor of Microbial Physiology and Chemistry at the University of Birmingham. Del is a leader in the study of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell wall biochemistry and physiology, whose work has identified the modes of action of the many anti-TB drugs. Del is currently working to identify new drug targets and identify the mechanisms that TB uses for intracellular survival.
      George Lomonossoff (John Innes Centre, UK)

    10. 18:45

      Meet the Speaker: Eric Freed
      Hall 7b, ICC Birmingham
      Are you a young virologist? Do you have a burning question to ask Eric Freed but find it too daunting to raise it during the symposium? Why not come and meet him informally over a glass of wine or a beer after the sessions have finished? There is no need to register, just turn up and join in.
      Eric Freed, National Cancer Institute, USA

Abstracts

The Abstracts Book for the Annual Conference 2015 is available for download:

Download abstracts book

Posters
  • Size of display: Standard A0 size (portrait orientation) 841mm(w) x 1189mm(h) - your poster should not exceed these measurements
  • Posters will be displayed on poster boards measuring 1m(w) x 2m(h), one to a side
  • Posters can ONLY be fixed by velcro
  • Your viewing time and details on setting up and taking down will be advised prior to the conference. Details on your poster number and location will be available in the programme booklet provided within your welcome pack on arrival
  • You are required to be available by your poster, during the designated time, to discuss the work presented
  • Kindly note that the Society cannot forward any posters not collected after the conference.  Please ensure you remove your poster by the designated time (as advised in the Programme Book).  Posters that are not removed by this time may be disposed of by the venue.
Oral presentations

In order to ensure your presentation runs smoothly, you are asked to comply with the following:

  • PowerPoint presentations - PC version - are brought to the conference on a USB memory stick
  • PowerPoint presentations - Mac version - can only be accepted if you bring your own laptop and connecting cables
  • Your presentation is given to the venue a/v support staff in the Speaker Preview Room  at least 2 hours in advance of your presentation to ensure compatibility with the equipment available.

Registration

Registration is now closed.

At the conference

The Registration Desk was located in the Foyer at the International Convention Centre, Birmingham.

The Registration Desk was open as follows:

  • Sunday 29 March 16:00 – 19:00
  • Monday 30 March, Tuesday 31 March and Wednesday 1 April 08:00 – 19:00
  • Thursday 2 April 08:00 – 15:00
What's included in your registration fee?
  • Admission to all conference sessions and the exhibition
  • Lunch Monday to Thursday
  • Tea/coffee Monday to Thursday
  • Conference programme and online abstract books
  • Certificate of participation
  • Vouchers for two free drinks during the poster viewing sessions on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday

Registration categories
(All rates are per day)

Registration fees
(Available until 23:59, Friday 27 February 2015**)

Affiliate

£150

Full-Concessionary Member

£60

Full Member

£80

Honorary Member

£0

International Associate Member resident in all other countries (excluding UK and Ireland)

£150

International Associate Member resident in lower-middle income economies***

£60

International Associate Member resident in low income economies***

£0

Postgraduate Student Member

£60

Undergraduate Student Member

£0

Non-Member (1)

£150

Non-Member (2)
Clinical Virology Network Members (CVN)*

£80

Non-Member (3)
Association of Applied Biologists Members (AAB)†

£80

* CVN members are welcome to attend the entire meeting at the rate specified or can attend the CVN meeting only from Tuesday lunchtime to Wednesday afternoon at £120. Please register using the 'Registration' button and select 'CVN members' on the second page.

** From 00:00 on Wednesday 4 March 2015 a further £10 late booking fee will be added (per day) to the advertised registration fees in the table.

*** See list of applicable countries.

† Association of Applied Biologists (AAB) members are welcome to attend the entire meeting at the rate specified. For AAB members wishing to attend the non-joint AAB sessions, please register directly with the AAB.

Please note: Society for General Microbiology lapsed members, who are not up to date with their membership fees, will not qualify for reduced registration rates. To renew membership or join the Society please contact +44(0)20 7685 2691 or email members@microbiologysociety.org.

Visa applications

If you need a letter of invitation for a visa application, we will be happy to supply this after we have received full payment. To find out if you need a visa to visit the UK, please visit the UK Border Agency website.

It is the policy of the Society for General Microbiology not to supply an invitation letter to any delegate without payment and we will not reply to any request from an unregistered delegate. When the delegate has paid, the Conference office will email back a confirmation/receipt letter and, upon request, a letter of invitation, which may be used to obtain the necessary visa.

Please note that all conference delegates are responsible for their own travel and visa arrangements; the Society for General Microbiology will not take any responsibility for travel or visa problems.

Registration confirmation

An email confirming your booking will be sent within one week of receiving your complete registration form.

Payment Information

All registration fees must be paid in full BEFORE arrival at the conference. Any outstanding registration fees must be paid before admittance will be granted to the conference.

Special dietary requirements

While every effort will be made to accommodate special dietary requirements, these cannot be guaranteed. Special dietary requirements must be indicated at the time of booking and sent by email to conferences@microbiologysociety.org. Those with special dietary requirements should identify themselves to a member of the catering team daily and they will be directed accordingly.

Liability and insurance

Neither the organisers, nor the Society will assume any responsibility whatsoever for damage or injury to persons or property during this event. Participants are advised to arrange their own personal travel and health insurance.

Cancellations

Refunds are not provided, however substitutions of attendees can be made at any time by contacting conferences@microbiologysociety.org.

Conference Grants

The Society offers funds via the Conference Grant schemes to support the attendance of members at all stages of their careers:

Closing date is 3 February 2015. See the relevant pages for further details including full terms and conditions.

Accommodation

All accommodation can be booked online through Reservation Highway, who have secured a range of options to suit all budgets throughout Birmingham at discounted rates.

Annual Conference 2015 Hotel List

Annual Conference 2015 Reservation Highway Accommodation Booking Form

Accommodation in guesthouses is also available. For further information and booking, please contact Reservation Highway.

Phone: +44 (0)1423 525577
Email: admin@reservation-highway.co.uk

Venue and directions

The conference was held at the ICC Birmingham:

The International Convention Centre
Broad Street
Birmingham, B1 2EA

General enquiries: 0121 644 5025
Email: info@theicc.co.uk

Registration, lunch, refreshments, the exhibition and poster viewing sessions were all held in Hall 3.

Getting there

Please see the detailed map and directions on the ICC Birmingham website.

By Car

The ICC is located centrally in Birmingham city centre and is easily accessible by road from all over the UK. Visitors from any direction can travel in to Birmingham using many different routes connected to the following motorways: M1, M5, M6, M6 Toll, M40 and M42.

There is abundant, secure multi-storey parking available located within the NIA, which is just a short walk away from the ICC. Both the ICC and NIA are signposted on motorways and major roads and are marked on most road maps.

By Air

Birmingham International Airport is one of the best connected airports in Europe. Over 50 airlines operate scheduled and charter services to more than 100 destinations including Europe, North America, the Middle East and the Indian Sub-Continent. The airport is just 8 miles from the city centre and is directly linked to Birmingham International Railway Station via an Airlink Shuttle.

The smaller East Midlands airport is 42 miles away. The closest London airport is London Luton, which is 92 miles away, and London Heathrow is 107 miles.

By Rail

The ICC is served by the UK’s largest interchange rail station, Birmingham New Street and the smaller Five Ways Station. Both stations are a short walk from the ICC and taxi ranks are situated close by. Birmingham New Street has direct and regular services to Birmingham International railway station which directly links to Birmingham International Airport and The NEC. It also has many direct services to London Euston, including a service that takes just 80 minutes and runs every 20 minutes.

Birmingham’s two other city centre train stations, Moor St and Snow Hill, are also within quick and easy access of the ICC and directly connected to London Marylebone or London Paddington via an hourly service.

Download maps for walking directions from the 3 main city centre train stations.

Information about train times and fares are available from the National Rail enquiries website.

Virgin Trains

Virgin trains offer discounted group travel for groups of between 3 and 9 passengers travelling together .  This currently stand at a 20% discount off Advance Fares booked through their website - for more information visit the group page of their website.

Coach

For information about travel by coach please visit the National Express website.

Car parking

The nearest car parks to the ICC are located at sister venue the NIA. The North car park is closest or alternatively simply follow the road around on to St Vincent Street for the West car park or carry on further around to Sheepcote Street for the South car park.

Current charges are from £2.30 for up to 2 hours to £8.00 for 24 hours. Payment can be made by coin or card at the Pay and Display machines or via the Parkmobile App. Full cark park charge details can be found here.

Alternative parking is located at Brindleyplace or Paradise Circus.

General info

Badges

Name badges must be worn at all times throughout the conference.

Business centre

The Business Reception centre, located next to the Box Office, has a range of excellent business support services. From photocopying and couriers to more specialist services, such as binding and laminating. They look forward to welcoming you.

For more information, contact the team:

Email: iccbusinesscentre@theicc.co.uk
Telephone: +44 (0) 121644 7178
Fax: +44 (0) 121644 7166

Café and restaurant

A small café and a small restaurant are located on Levels 2 and 3 of the ICC. Please note, delegates will be required to pay for anything purchased.

Cash machine

A cash machine is situated in the Mall of the ICC, Birmingham. This machine does not charge for cash withdrawals.

Certificates of attendance

A certificate of attendance can be requested at  the Registration Desk.

CPD

This conference has been approved for CPD by the Royal College of Pathologists, the Institute of Biomedical Scientists and the Royal Society of Biology.

Those wishing to claim CPD points should sign in daily in the relevant folder on the CPD table next to the Registration Desk and claim their certificate on departure.

Exhibition

Location: Hall 3, ICC, Birmingham

Opening times:

  • Monday - Wednesday 10:00 – 20:00
  • Thursday 10:00 – 13:30
Internet access

ICC Birmingham offers free WIFI for all visitors. Access is granted by accepting ICC terms and conditions.

Meals and refreshments

Lunch and refreshments are served in the exhibition area located in Hall 3, ICC, Birmingham. Please see the scientific programme for specific times.

Mobile phones

Please ensure that mobile phones are switched off or in silent mode during scientific sessions.

Scientific posters

Posters were presented in Hall 3, ICC, Birmingham. Please see the scientific programme for the board number on which your poster was displayed.

Posters should be displayed for the duration of your attendance and it will be possible to display from 09:00 on Monday until 13:30 on Thursday. Poster viewing sessions will take place on Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday from 18:15 until 20:00. All posters should be removed by 13:30 on Thursday. The Society cannot take responsibility for any posters left behind after this time.

Two glasses of wine, beer or soft drink were provided at all evening poster viewing sessions on presentation of the appropriate drink voucher supplied with your delegate badge. We regret that vouchers are not transferable and cannot be replaced.

Programme changes

While every effort will be made to keep programme changes to a minimum, any changes will be advised at the Registration Desk.

Recording

Only recording set up with prior permission is allowed.

Twitter

Delegates and speakers tweeting from the conference were invited to include the hashtag #sgmbham in their tweets. A Twitter feed was displayed in the Exhibition Area. You can follow the Society on Twitter @MicrobioSoc.

Please respect speakers' right to request you do not tweet during their presentation.

Updates from the conference can also be found on the Society Facebook page at www.facebook.com/MicrobioSoc

Venue floor plan

Download venue floor plan

Exhibitors

Exhibitor floor plan

Download floor plan

Exhibitors

Click on the Exhibitor's logo to go to their website.

APHA Scientific Apollo Scientific Applikon
Cambio Eppendorf Eurofins Genomics
FEMS Garland Science GenMark Diagnostics
LGC Merck Millipore MicrobesNG
MP Biomedicals New England BioLabs Oxford Biosystems
Royal Society Publishing Sartorius Limited Singer Instruments
Stratech Scientific Ltd Synbiosis Syngene
Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc Triple Red

 

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